African American Bestsellers for June 2013

The bestselling books for June 2013 from Amazon.com.

  1. Mo’ Meta Blues: The World According to Questlove by Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2013-06-18, Hardcover)
    Mo’ Meta Blues is a punch-drunk memoir in which Everyone’s Favorite Questlove tells his own story while tackling some of the lates, the greats, the fakes, the philosophers, the heavyweights, and the true originals of the music world. He digs deep into the album cuts of his life and unearths some pivotal moments in black art, hip hop, and pop culture. Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson is many things: virtuoso drummer, producer, arranger, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon bandleader, DJ, composer, and tireless Tweeter. He is one of our most ubiquitous cultural tastemakers, and in this, his first book, he reveals his own formative experiences–from growing up in 1970s West Philly as the son of a 1950s doo-wop singer, to finding his own way through the music world and ultimately co-founding and rising up with the Roots, a.k.a., the last hip hop band on Earth.

     

  2. Never Say Never: A Novel by Victoria Christopher Murray
    (Touchstone, 2013-06-04, Paperback)
    In this emotionally charged and inspiring novel about a love triangle, secrets between best friends threaten to blow up friendships and a marriage and change lives forever. When Miriam’s fireman husband, Chauncey, dies while rescuing students from a school fire, Miriam feels like her life is over. How is she going to raise her three children all by herself? How will she survive without the love of her life? Luckily, Miriam’s sister-friend Emily and Emily’s husband, Jamal, are there to comfort her. Jamal and Chauncey grew up together and were best friends; Jamal and Emily know they will do all they can to support Miriam through her grief. Jamal steps in and helps Miriam with the funeral arrangements and with her children, plus he gives her hope that she has a future. But all the time that they spend together—grieving, sharing, and reminiscing—brings the two closer in ways they never planned. . . .

     

  3. Dirty Rotten Liar (Misadventures of Mink LaRue) by Noire
    (Kensington Books, 2013-06-25, Kindle Edition)
    Noire’s versatile storytelling keeps the urban erotic genre hot! –Kiki Swinson, bestselling author of the Wifey seriesWhat can go wrong when con-mami Mink LaRue joins forces with her slick-tongued look-alike Dy-Nasty Jenkins to run a three-hundred-grand hustle on the super-rich Dominion oil family? With the conniving Philadelphia stripper Dy-Nasty seeking to dip her fingers into the same pot of gold, Mink knows she has to play her hand right and hustle at the very top of her grind. But when Mink is suddenly called back home to be at the bedside of her sick mother, she is forced to leave Dy-Nasty alone at the mansion to work a solo scam on the Dominions and possibly claim the entire jackpot for herself. Will Dy-Nasty lie her way into the hearts of the Dominions and be declared a rightful heir to the vast family fortune? Or, will fate throw a cruel twist in the game and get both ghetto princesses kicked out of the mansion and left on the curb, dead broke? “Noire knows all about street slang, scams, strip clubs, and fierce sex bouts. . .This is top-of-the-line street lit.” –Library Journal on Natural Born Liar (starred review) “Sizzling, action-packed, electric and gut-wrenching.” –RT Book Reviews on Lifestyles of the Rich and Shameless

     

  4. The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture: Volume 23: Folk Art
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2013-06-03, Paperback)
    Folk art is one of the American South’s most significant areas of creative achievement, and this comprehensive yet accessible reference details that achievement from the sixteenth century through the present. This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture explores the many forms of aesthetic expression that have characterized southern folk art, including the work of self-taught artists, as well as the South’s complex relationship to national patterns of folk art collecting. Fifty-two thematic essays examine subjects ranging from colonial portraiture, Moravian material culture, and southern folk pottery to the South’s rich quilt-making traditions, memory painting, and African American vernacular art, and 211 topical essays include profiles of major folk and self-taught artists in the region.

     

  5. Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream by Christina M. Greer
    (Oxford University Press, USA, 2013-06-06, Paperback)
    The steady immigration of black populations from Africa and the Caribbean over the past few decades has fundamentally changed the racial, ethnic, and political landscape in the United States. But how will these “new blacks” behave politically in America? Using an original survey of New York City workers and multiple national data sources, Christina M. Greer explores the political significance of ethnicity for new immigrant and native-born blacks. In an age where racial and ethnic identities intersect, intertwine, and interact in increasingly complex ways, Black Ethnics offers a powerful and rigorous analysis of black politics and coalitions in the post-Civil Rights era.

     

  6. After the Dawn: A Family Affair Novel by Francis Ray
    (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2013-06-18, Paperback)
    Samantha Collins is stunned when her grandfather turns Collins Industry over to her, causing more than a bit of ill will among the other family members, especially her uncle, Evan. But nothing stuns her more than when she finds out that he has asked Dillon Montgomery to help her run the company. Her grandfather had fired Dillon and ordered him off the company property years ago.   Twelve years ago Samantha made her feelings known to Dillon and the whole thing ended in disaster and they haven’t spoken since. Working together now, even all these years later, is sure to be a disaster. Still, she needs his help if she is going to keep Collins Industry afloat. But will the prodigal son return to the empire – and the woman – who desperately need him? Will he be able to admit how much he desperately needs them.

     

  7. Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation (Littlefield History of the Civil War Era) by Caroline E. Janney
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2013-06-03, Hardcover)
    As early as 1865, survivors of the Civil War were acutely aware that people were purposefully shaping what would be remembered about the war and what would be omitted from the historical record. In Remembering the Civil War, Caroline E. Janney examines how the war generation–men and women, black and white, Unionists and Confederates–crafted and protected their memories of the nation’s greatest conflict. Janney maintains that the participants never fully embraced the reconciliation so famously represented in handshakes across stone walls. Instead, both Union and Confederate veterans, and most especially their respective women’s organizations, clung tenaciously to their own causes well into the twentieth century. Janney explores the subtle yet important differences between reunion and reconciliation and argues that the Unionist and Emancipationist memories of the war never completely gave way to the story Confederates told. She challenges the idea that white northerners and southerners salved their war wounds through shared ideas about race and shows that debates about slavery often proved to be among the most powerful obstacles to reconciliation.

     

  8. Long Division by Kiese Laymon
    (Agate Bolden, 2013-06-11, Paperback)
    Kiese Laymon’s debut novel is a Twain-esque exploration of celebrity, authorship, violence, religion, and coming of age in Post-Katrina Mississippi, written in a voice that’s alternately funny, lacerating, and wise. The book contains two interwoven stories. In the first, it’s 2013: after an on-stage meltdown during a nationally televised quiz contest, 14-year-old Citoyen “City” Coldson becomes an overnight YouTube celebrity. The next day, he’s sent to stay with his grandmother in the small coastal community of Melahatchie, where a young girl named Baize Shephard has recently disappeared.Before leaving, City is given a strange book without an author called “Long Division.” He learns that one of the book’s main characters is also named City Coldson—but “Long Division” is set in 1985. This 1985 City, along with his friend and love-object, Shalaya Crump, discovers a way to travel into the future, and steals a laptop and cellphone from an orphaned teenage rapper called…Baize Shephard. They ultimately take these with them all the way back to 1964, to help another time-traveler they meet protect his family from the Klan.City’s two stories ultimately converge in the mysterious work shed behind his grandmother’s, where he discovers the key to Baize’s disappearance.

     

  9. Sister: An African American Life in Search of Justice (Wisconsin Studies in Autobiography) by Sylvia Bell White
    (University of Wisconsin Press, 2013-06-06, Hardcover)
    Raised with twelve brothers in a part of the segregated South that provided no school for African American children through the 1940s, Sylvia Bell White went North as a teenager, dreaming of a nursing career and a freedom defined in part by wartime rhetoric about American ideals. In Milwaukee she and her brothers persevered through racial rebuffs and discrimination to find work. Barred by both her gender and color from employment in the city’s factories, Sylvia scrubbed floors, worked as a nurse’s aide, and took adult education courses.            When a Milwaukee police officer killed her younger brother Daniel Bell in 1958, the Bell family suspected a racial murder but could do nothing to prove it—until twenty years later, when one of the two officers involved in the incident unexpectedly came forward. Daniel’s siblings filed a civil rights lawsuit against the city and ultimately won that four-year legal battle. Sylvia was the driving force behind their quest for justice.            Telling her whole life story in these pages, Sylvia emerges as a buoyant spirit, a sparkling narrator, and, above all, a powerful witness to racial injustice. Jody LePage’s chapter introductions frame the narrative in a historical span that reaches from Sylvia’s own enslaved grandparents to the nation’s first African American president. Giving depth to that wide sweep, this oral history brings us into the presence of an extraordinary individual. Rarely does such a voice receive a hearing.

     

  10. Children Are Diamonds: An African Apocalypse by Edward Hoagland
    (Arcade Publishing, 2013-06-01, Hardcover)
    An African apocalypse by “one of the very best writers of his generation” (Saul Bellow).This is not the Africa of Isak Dinesen, nor the Africa of Joy Adamson. This is the Africa of civil wars and tribal massacres, where the Lord’s Resistance Army recruits child-soldiers after forcing them to kill their parents and eat their hearts. The aid workers who voluntarily subject themselves to life here are a breed of their own.Meet Hickey, an American school teacher in his late thirties, an American school teacher who burns his bridges with the school board and goes to Africa as an aid worker. Working for an agency in Nairobi, one of his jobs is to drive food and medical supplies to Southern Sudan to an aid station run by Ruth, a middle-aged woman, who acts as nurse, doctor, hospice worker, feeder of starving children, and witness. Ruth is gruff but efficient, and Hickey, who is usually drawn to youth and beauty, is struck by her devotion. Returning to Nairobi, he can’t forget what he has seen.When the violence and chaos in the region increase to a fever pitch and aid workers are being slaughtered or evacuated, Hickey is asked to save Ruth overland by Jeep. What happens to them and the children that have joined their journey is the searing climax of this novel. Hoagland paints an unflinching portrait of a living hell at its worst, and yet amid that suffering there is hope in the form of humility, sacrifice, and life-affirming friendship.

     

  11. Nigeria: Dancing on the Brink by John Campbell
    (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013-06-16, Paperback)
    Nigeria, the United States’ most important strategic partner in West Africa, is in grave trouble. While Nigerians often claim they are masters of dancing on the brink without falling off, the disastrous administration of President Goodluck Jonathan, the radical Islamic insurrection Boko Haram, and escalating violence in the delta and the north may finally provide the impetus that pushes it into the abyss of state failure. In this thoroughly updated edition, John Campbell explores Nigeria’s post-colonial history and presents a nuanced explanation of the events and conditions that have carried this complex, dynamic, and very troubled giant to the edge. Central to his analysis are the oil wealth, endemic corruption, and elite competition that have undermined Nigeria’s nascent democratic institutions and alienated an increasingly impoverished population. However, state failure is not inevitable, nor is it in the interest of the United States. Campbell provides concrete new policy options that would not only allow the United States to help Nigeria avoid state failure but also to play a positive role in Nigeria’s political, social, and economic development.

     

  12. Discovering Wes Moore by Wes Moore
    (Listening Library (Audio), 2013-06-11, Audio CD)
    Through the telling of events from his own life, Wes Moore (author of the bestselling adult title The Other Wes Moore) explores the issues that separate success and failure. He also counterpoints his story with another man, someone who shared the same name, was almost the same age, grew up fatherless in a similar Baltimore neighborhood, but is serving a life sentence for murder. Compelled to write to the other Wes, the author was surprised to receive a reply. And so began a friendship, as letters turned into visits and the two men got to know one another. This compelling story about the challenges of growing up and the responsibility for the choices we make, is sure to inspire. Includes an 8-page photo insert.

     

  13. Drop Dead, Gorgeous by J. D. Mason
    (St. Martin’s Press, 2013-06-25, Hardcover)
    Desimonda returned to seek out revenge in Beautiful, Dirty, Rich. Now her best friend, Lonnie, is out for a little payback of her own Lonnie Adebayo, best friend to Desimonda Greene, is a walking, talking billboard for the old adage, “You can’t keep a good woman down.”  But Jordan Gatewood has done so much more than just try and keep her down. He made a huge mistake when he put his hands on her, thinking that he could get away with it.  But he made an even bigger mistake by not making sure that she was dead before he left that house. Finding his secret half-brother is just the beginning of Lonnie’s plot for revenge. 

     

  14. African American Women’s Life Issues Today: Vital Health and Social Matters by Catherine Fisher Collins
    (Praeger, 2013-06-30, Hardcover)
    Written by an all-female, all-African American team of health experts that include nurse practitioners, registered nurses, educators, and psychologists, this book focuses on the diseases and related social issues that cause the greatest harm and pose the greatest threat to African American women today. Its chapters address topics as varied as heart disease, cancer, sexually transmitted diseases, domestic violence, cervical and breast cancers, obesity, depression, mental illness, dementia/Alzheimer’s, and incarcerated women’s health care. A chapter is dedicated to identifying the social, cultural, and environmental barriers that block African American women from experiencing the best possible lives. Providing comprehensive coverage of the topic from an Afrocentric perspective, this text will be of great interest to medical and psychological health professionals and professors; social workers, counselors, and students in these fields; as well as African American women seeking current and expert information on these health threats.

     

  15. Mister and Lady Day: Billie Holiday and the Dog Who Loved Her by Amy Novesky
    (Harcourt Children’s Books, 2013-06-18, Hardcover)
    Billie Holiday—also known as Lady Day—had fame, style, a stellar voice, big gardenias in her hair, and lots of dogs. She had a coat-pocket poodle, a beagle, Chihuahuas, a Great Dane, and more, but her favorite was a boxer named Mister. Mister was always there to bolster her courage through good times and bad, even before her legendary appearance at New York’s Carnegie Hall. Newton’s stylish illustrations keep the simply told story focused on the loving bond between Billie Holiday and her treasured boxer. An author’s note deals more directly with the singer’s troubled life, and includes a little-known photo of Mister and Lady Day!

     

  16. Fearless Voices: Engaging a New Generation of African American Adolescent Male Writers by Alfred Tatum
    (Scholastic Teaching Resources (Theory an, 2013-06-01, Paperback)
    Tatum addresses the power of writing to connect young people with the deeper meaning in their own lives as they put their voices on record, exploring, in particular, writing as a tool to navigate lives in “communities of turmoil” and build positive relationships. Additionally, he’ll explore the power of writing to help students construct meaning as readers as they explore the enabling literary works of their textual lineages. The book also addresses the practical implications of supporting students as writers and, to that end, targets teachers as writers. For use with Grades 6 & Up.

     

  17. The Exchange by Nikki Rashan
    (Urban Books, 2013-06-25, Paperback)

     

  18. Blacks In and Out of the Left (The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures) by Michael C. Dawson
    (Harvard University Press, 2013-06-18, Hardcover)
    The radical black left that played a crucial role in twentieth-century struggles for equality and justice has largely disappeared. Michael Dawson investigates the causes and consequences of the decline of black radicalism as a force in American politics and argues that the conventional left has failed to take race sufficiently seriously as a historical force in reshaping American institutions, politics, and civil society. African Americans have been in the vanguard of progressive social movements throughout American history, but they have been written out of many histories of social liberalism. Focusing on the 1920s and 1930s, as well as the Black Power movement, Dawson examines successive failures of socialists and Marxists to enlist sympathetic blacks, and white leftists’ refusal to fight for the cause of racial equality. Angered by the often outright hostility of the Socialist Party and similar social democratic organizations, black leftists separated themselves from these groups and either turned to the hard left or stayed independent. A generation later, the same phenomenon helped fueled the Black Power movement’s turn toward a variety of black nationalist, Maoist, and other radical political groups. The 2008 election of Barack Obama notwithstanding, many African Americans still believe they will not realize the fruits of American prosperity any time soon. This pervasive discontent, Dawson suggests, must be mobilized within the black community into active opposition to the social and economic status quo. Black politics needs to find its way back to its radical roots as a vital component of new American progressive movements.

     

Leave a Reply