Category Archives: News

News affecting the publication, promotion, and selling of African American books

News: Chicago schools order book on Iran out of some classes

By Mary Wisniewski CHICAGO (Reuters) –
The Chicago Public Schools ignited a controversy this week by ordering that “Persepolis,” a critically acclaimed graphic novel about a girl growing up in Iran at the time of the Islamic revolution, be removed from some classrooms. CPS Chief Executive Barbara Byrd-Bennett said on Friday that the district was not banning the book, by Marjane Satrapi, but had decided that it was “not appropriate for general use” in the seventh grade curriculum. …

For the full story, read Yahoo News

2013 AAMBC Literary Award Winners

2013 Literary Awards Winners and Nominees from the African Americans on the Move Book Club
http://aambookclub.com/2013-aambc-award-full-list-of-winners-aambcawards

Break Out Author of the Year
Monica Mathis Stowe – Where Did We Go Wrong?
Tyora Moody – When Rain Falls (Victory Gospel Series #1)
Drusilla Mars – Black Fire
Nicety – Juicy: Pandora’s Box
Fabiola Joseph – Rebel’s Domain: Scarred For Life (Volume 1)

Independent Book Store of the Year
Cartel
Books and Beauty
The Literary Joint
Hueman Books
Black and Nobel

Magazine of the Year
JET
Urban Grapevine Magazine
Ebony
Essence
Sormag

Book Club of the Year
Reading Diva
Black Faithful Sisters and Brothers Book Club
OOSA
Sugar and Spice
Book Groupies Book Club

Street Lit Writer of the Year
Fabiola Joseph – Rebel’s Domain: Scarred For Life (Volume 1)
Kwan – Animal
David Weaver – The Power Family
Eyone Williams – Secrets Never Die
Treasure Blue – Little Bag Girl

Poet of the Year
GPA – The Mind of a Poetic Unsub
Kai – Peaceful Resolution
Luella Hill – Message In My Pen

Independent Publisher of the Year
Life Changing Books
Cash Money Content
Cartel Publications
Melodrama
SBR Productions

Book Reviewer of the Year
Blaze Reviews
OOSA
Carla Towns
Urban Reviews
Rawsistaz

Urban Book of the Year
Angry Ass Black Woman by Karen Quinoes Miller
The Cartel 4 by Ashley and JaQuavis
Where Did We Go Wrong? By Monica Mathis Stowe
Aminal by Kwan
Hated by Many, Loved by None by Shan

Male Author of the Year
Rahiem Brooks
David Weaver
Carl Weber
Brian W. Smith
Kwan

Vote for the Female Author of the Year
Myss Shan – Hated by Many, Loved by None
Ashley Antoinette – Guilty Gucci
Kenni York – Karma
Kimberla Lawson Roby – The Reverend’s Wife
Vanna B – Fancy

Christian Fiction Writer of the Year
Victoria Christopher Murray – Scandalous
Reshonda Tate Billingsley – The Secret She Kept
Shelia E. Lipsey for her book- What’s Blood Got To Do With It?
Vanessa Davis Griggs for her book- The Other Side of Dare (Blessed Trinity Novels)
Tyora Moody for her book- When Rain Falls (Victory Gospel Series #1)

Reader’s Choice Award
Treasure Blue
Nicety
Vanna B
Wahida Clark
Traci Bee

Romance writer of the Year
Zuri Day – Love on the run
Donna Hill – Everything is You
Traci Bee – A Nickel for a Kiss
Sadeqa Johnson – Love in a Carry On Bag
Anna Black – Who Do I Run To?

Nate Holmes Honorary Award
Rahiem Brooks
Treasure blue
Shelia E. Lipsey
Troy Johnson
Clarence Nero

AAMBC Author of the Year
Silk White – Married To Da Street
Jonean Mclain- Checkmate
Keith Thomas Walker fir his book- Dripping Chocolate
CJ Hudson – Knuckleheadz
Erica Crump – MISCELLANEOUS BLUES

Los Angeles Black Book Expo, August 17, 2013

The Los Angeles Black Book Expo is proud to announce the date of this year’s event, August 17, 2013.

They will return to the Los Angeles Convention Center in the West Hall in Rooms 502-507. Registration for LABBX will be announced shortly.

For inquiries on exhibitor spots, send an email to blackbookexpola@gmail.com. The website is moving to a new location, LABBX.org and will be updated in the near future.

2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here’s a list of 2012′s bestselling African American books from Amazon.com as of September 2012.

  1. The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander
    (New Press, The, 2012-01-16, Paperback)
    The New Jim Crow was initially published with a modest first printing and reasonable expectations for a hard-hitting book on a tough topic. Now, ten-plus printings later, the long-awaited paperback version of the book Lani Guinier calls “brave and bold,” and Pulitzer Prize–winner David Levering Lewis calls “stunning,” will at last be available.In the era of colorblindness, it is no longer socially permissible to use race, explicitly, as a justification for discrimination, exclusion, and social contempt. Yet, as legal star Michelle Alexander reveals, today it is perfectly legal to discriminate against convicted criminals in nearly all the ways that it was once legal to discriminate against African Americans. Once you’re labeled a felon, the old forms of discrimination—employment discrimination, housing discrimination, denial of the right to vote, denial of educational opportunity, denial of food stamps and other public benefits, and exclusion from jury service—are suddenly legal.
    Featured on The Tavis Smiley Show, Bill Moyers Journal, Democracy Now, and C-Span’s Washington Journal, The New Jim Crow has become an overnight phenomenon, sparking a much-needed conversation—including a recent mention by Cornel West on Real Time with Bill Maher — about ways in which our system of mass incarceration has come to resemble systems of racial control from a different era.

     

  2. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson
    (Little, Brown and Company, 2012-11-12, Hardcover)
    It’s Christmas Eve and Detective Alex Cross has been called out to catch someone who’s robbing his church’s poor box. That mission behind him, Alex returns home to celebrate with Bree, Nana, and his children. The tree decorating is barely underway before his phone rings again–a horrific hostage situation is quickly spiraling out of control. Away from his own family on the most precious of days, Alex calls upon every ounce of his training, creativity, and daring to save another family. Alex risks everything–and he may not make it back alive on this most sacred of family days. Alex Cross is a hero for our time, and never more so than in this story of family, action, and the deepest moral choices.

     

  3. The Cutting Season: A Novel by Attica Locke
    (Harper, 2012-09-18, Hardcover)
    In Black Water Rising, Attica Locke delivered one of the most stunning and sure-handed fiction debuts in recent memory, garnering effusive critical praise, several award nominations, and passionate reader response. Now Locke returns with The Cutting Season, a riveting thriller that intertwines two murders separated across more than a century. Caren Gray manages Belle Vie, a sprawling antebellum plantation that sits between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, where the past and the present coexist uneasily. The estate’s owners have turned the place into an eerie tourist attraction, complete with full-dress re-enactments and carefully restored slave quarters. Outside the gates, a corporation with ambitious plans has been busy snapping up land from struggling families who have been growing sugar cane for generations, and now replacing local employees with illegal laborers. Tensions mount when the body of a female migrant worker is found in a shallow grave on the edge of the property, her throat cut clean. As the investigation gets under way, the list of suspects grows. But when fresh evidence comes to light and the sheriff’s department zeros in on a person of interest, Caren has a bad feeling that the police are chasing the wrong leads. Putting herself at risk, she ventures into dangerous territory as she unearths startling new facts about a very old mystery—the long-ago disappearance of a former slave—that has unsettling ties to the current murder. In pursuit of the truth about Belle Vie’s history and her own, Caren discovers secrets about both cases—ones that an increasingly desperate killer will stop at nothing to keep buried. Taut, hauntingly resonant, and beautifully written, The Cutting Season is at once a thoughtful meditation on how America reckons its past with its future, and a high-octane page-turner that unfolds with tremendous skill and vision. With her rare gift for depicting human nature in all its complexities, Attica Locke demonstrates once again that she is “destined for literary stardom” (Dallas Morning News).

     

  4. The Communist by Paul Kengor
    (Mercury Ink, 2012-07-17, Hardcover)
    In his memoir, Barack Obama omits the full name of his mentor, simply calling him “Frank.” Now, the truth is out: Never has a figure as deeply troubling and controversial as Frank Marshall Davis had such an impact on the development of an American president. Although other radical influences on Obama, from Jeremiah Wright to Bill Ayers, have been scrutinized, the public knows little about Davis, a card-carrying member of the Communist Party USA, cited by the Associated Press as an “important influence” on Obama, one whom he “looked to” not merely for “advice on living” but as a “father” figure. While the Left has willingly dismissed Davis (with good reason), here are the indisputable, eye-opening facts: Frank Marshall Davis was a pro-Soviet, pro–Red China communist. His Communist Party USA card number, revealed in FBI files, was CP #47544. He was a prototype of the loyal Soviet patriot, so radical that the FBI placed him on the federal government’s Security Index. In the early 1950s, Davis opposed U.S. attempts to slow Stalin and Mao. He favored Red Army takeovers of Central and Eastern Europe, and communist control in Korea and Vietnam. Dutifully serving the cause, he edited and wrote for communist newspapers in both Chicago and Honolulu, courting contributors who were Soviet agents. In the 1970s, amid this dangerous political theater, Frank Marshall Davis came into Barack Obama’s life. Aided by access to explosive declassified FBI files, Soviet archives, and Davis’s original newspaper columns, Paul Kengor explores how Obama sought out Davis and how Davis found in Obama an impressionable young man, one susceptible to Davis’s worldview that opposed American policy and traditional values while praising communist regimes. Kengor sees remnants of this worldview in Obama’s early life and even, ultimately, his presidency.

     

  5. Yes, Chef: A Memoir by Marcus Samuelsson
    (Random House, 2012-06-26, Hardcover)
    It begins with a simple ritual: Every Saturday afternoon, a boy who loves to cook walks to his grandmother’s house and helps her prepare a roast chicken for dinner. The grandmother is Swedish, a retired domestic. The boy is Ethiopian and adopted, and he will grow up to become the world-renowned chef Marcus Samuelsson. This book is his love letter to food and family in all its manifestations. 
    Yes, Chef chronicles Marcus Samuelsson’s remarkable journey from Helga’s humble kitchen to some of the most demanding and cutthroat restaurants in Switzerland and France, from his grueling stints on cruise ships to his arrival in New York City, where his outsize talent and ambition finally come together at Aquavit, earning him a coveted New York Times three-star rating at the age of twenty-four. But Samuelsson’s career of  “chasing flavors,” as he calls it, had only just begun—in the intervening years, there have been White House state dinners, career crises, reality show triumphs and, most important, the opening of the beloved Red Rooster in Harlem. At Red Rooster, Samuelsson has fufilled his dream of creating a truly diverse, multiracial dining room—a place where presidents and prime ministers rub elbows with jazz musicians, aspiring artists, bus drivers, and nurses. It is a place where an orphan from Ethiopia, raised in Sweden, living in America, can feel at home.  
    With disarming honesty and intimacy, Samuelsson also opens up about his failures—the price of ambition, in human terms—and recounts his emotional journey, as a grown man, to meet the father he never knew. Yes, Chef is a tale of personal discovery, unshakable determination, and the passionate, playful pursuit of flavors—one man’s struggle to find a place for himself in the kitchen, and in the world.

     

  6. It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership by Colin Powell
    (Harper, 2012-05-22, Hardcover)
    It Worked for Me is filled with vivid experiences and lessons learned that have shaped the legendary public service career of the four-star general and former Secretary of State Colin Powell. At its heart are Powell’s “Thirteen Rules”—notes he gathered over the years and that now form the basis of his leadership presentations given throughout the world. Powell’s short but sweet rules—among them, “Get mad, then get over it” and “Share credit”—are illustrated by revealing personal stories that introduce and expand upon his principles for effective leadership: conviction, hard work, and, above all, respect for others. In work and in life, Powell writes, “it’s about how we touch and are touched by the people we meet. It’s all about the people.” A natural storyteller, Powell offers warm and engaging parables with wise advice on succeeding in the workplace and beyond. “Trust your people,” he counsels as he delegates presidential briefing responsibilities to two junior State Department desk officers. “Do your best—someone is watching,” he advises those just starting out, recalling his own teenage summer job mopping floors in a soda-bottling factory. Powell combines the insights he has gained serving in the top ranks of the military and in four presidential administrations with the lessons he’s learned from his immigrant-family upbringing in the Bronx, his training in the ROTC, and his growth as an Army officer. The result is a powerful portrait of a leader who is reflective, self-effacing, and grateful for the contributions of everyone he works with. Colin Powell’s It Worked for Me is bound to inspire, move, and surprise readers. Thoughtful and revealing, it is a brilliant and original blueprint for leadership.

     

  7. Trouble & Triumph: A Novel of Power & Beauty by Tip “T.I.” Harris
    (William Morrow, 2012-09-18, Hardcover)
    Grammy Award-winning hip-hop artist, music producer, and actor T.I. and his bestselling celebrity collaborator, David Ritz, continue the explosive story of Power and Beauty that began in the street-lit epic Power & Beauty. When his mother, Charlotte, was killed, Paul “Power” Clay and his closest friend, Tanya “Beauty” Long, fell under the spell of a savvy and ruthless Atlanta businessman named Slim, who promised to protect them. Wise beyond her years, Beauty always knew that the only person she could rely on was herself. It didn’t take long for the levelheaded young woman to recognize the simmering violence beneath Slim’s street charm. But getting away from him wasn’t easy, and it came at a heartbreaking price: turning her back on Power. Escaping to the glamorous catwalks of the Big Apple, she’s worked her breathtaking good looks and quick wit to build a thriving fashion business. Despite her success, she’s still haunted by the pain of leaving Power behind. Money and new men cannot erase the memory of the true love she denied. To Power, Slim’s world held everything he thought he wanted: women, wealth, power, authority. He discovered too late that Slim Simmons isn’t just a businessman—he’s a ruthless killer who will turn on anyone he thinks is getting in his way. He is the monster who murdered Charlotte. Now, he controls the fate of her only son. But neither Slim nor Power count on Beauty. Like Slim, she is a master who will manipulate, seduce, and sacrifice to get what she wants. She’s never let anything stop her from fulfilling her desires, and she will broker a dangerous bargain to save the only man she’s ever loved. But is saving Power worth sacrificing herself—body and soul? Will his youthful ambitions lead him to redemption—or deeper into the darkness? Will they both become everything they swore they’d never be? A tale of gangstas and sistas, money masters and politicians, that moves across the globe from Paris to New York, Atlanta to Tokyo, the Caribbean to California, Trouble & Triumph is a hip-hop mash-up of loyalty, betrayal, revenge, desire, greed, family, politics, and absolution—and of two unforgettable young star-crossed lovers from the streets who will risk everything for their dreams . . . and for each other.

     

  8. Salvage the Bones: A Novel by Jesmyn Ward
    (Bloomsbury USA, 2012-04-24, Paperback)
    Winner of the 2011 National Book Award A hurricane is building over the Gulf of Mexico, threatening the coastal town of Bois Sauvage, Mississippi, and Esch’s father is growing concerned. A hard drinker, largely absent, he doesn’t show concern for much else. Esch and her three brothers are stocking food, but there isn’t much to save. Lately, Esch can’t keep down what food she gets; she’s fourteen and pregnant. Her brother Skeetah is sneaking scraps for his prized pitbull’s new litter, dying one by one in the dirt. Meanwhile, brothers Randall and Junior try to stake their claim in a family long on child’s play and short on parenting.As the twelve days that make up the novel’s framework yield to their dramatic conclusion, this unforgettable family-motherless children sacrificing for one another as they can, protecting and nurturing where love is scarce-pulls itself up to face another day. A big-hearted novel about familial love and community against all odds, and a wrenching look at the lonesome, brutal, and restrictive realities of rural poverty, Salvage the Bones is muscled with poetry, revelatory, and real.

     

  9. The Cartel 4 by Ashley and JaQuavis
    (Kensington, 2012-11-01, Paperback)
    [MP3CD audiobook format in vinyl case.] [Read by Cary Hite] New York Times bestselling authors Ashley and JaQuavis deliver the highly anticipated fourth installment of the wildly popular ‘Cartel’ series. You thought the Cartel was over, but Diamonds are forever . . . The Diamond family has survived murder, deceit, and betrayal. Through it all, they’re still standing tall, and a new era has begun. After surviving an attempt on her life, Breeze has moved into the queen’s position by Zyir’s side. Zyir has taken over the empire and locked down Miami’s streets; the world is in his hands. But there is always new blood ready to overthrow the throne. Young Carter has retired and moved away from the madness — that is, until he gets an unexpected visitor at his home. This person shakes up the whole family, causing chaos that threatens to bring down the Cartel for good. [*Produced by Buck 50 Productions]

     

  10. Kill Alex Cross by James Patterson
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2012-05-22, Paperback)
    The only wayDetective Alex Cross is one of the first on the scene of the biggest case he’s ever been part of. The President’s son and daughter have been abducted from their school – an impossible crime, but somehow the kidnapper has done it. Alex does everything he can but is shunted to the fringes of the investigation. Someone powerful doesn’t want Cross too close.To stop Alex CrossA deadly contagion in the DC water supply threatens to cripple the capital, and Alex sees the looming shape of the most devastating attack the United States has ever experienced. He is already working flat-out on the abduction, and this massive assault pushes Cross completely over the edge.Is to kill himWith each hour that passes, the chance of finding the children alive diminishes. In an emotional private meeting, the First Lady asks Alex to please save her kids. Even the highest security clearance doesn’t get him any closer to the kidnapper – and Alex makes a desperate decision that goes against everything he believes. A full-throttle thriller with unstoppable action, unrestrained emotion, and relentless suspense, Kill Alex Cross is the most gripping Alex Cross novel James Patterson has ever written.

     

  11. An Invisible Thread: The True Story of an 11-Year-Old Panhandler, a Busy Sales Executive, and an Unlikely Meeting with Destiny by Laura Schroff
    (Howard Books, 2012-08-07, Paperback)
    Stopping was never part of the plan . . . She was a successful ad sales rep in Manhattan. He was a homeless, eleven-year-old panhandler on the street. He asked for spare change; she kept walking. But then something stopped her in her tracks, and she went back. And she continued to go back, again and again. They met up nearly every week for years and built an unexpected, life-changing friendship that has today spanned almost three decades. Whatever made me notice him on that street corner so many years ago is clearly something that cannot be extinguished, no matter how relentless the forces aligned against it. Some may call it spirit. Some may call it heart. It drew me to him, as if we were bound by some invisible, unbreakable thread. And whatever it is, it binds us still.

     

  12. Home by Toni Morrison
    (Knopf, 2012-05-08, Hardcover)
    America’s most celebrated novelist, Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison extends her profound take on our history with this twentieth-century tale of redemption: a taut and tortured story about one man’s desperate search for himself in a world disfigured by war.Frank Money is an angry, self-loathing veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. His home may seem alien to him, but he is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from and that he’s hated all his life. As Frank revisits his memories from childhood and the war that have left him questioning his sense of self, he discovers a profound courage he had thought he could never possess again. A deeply moving novel about an apparently defeated man finding his manhood—and his home.

     

  13. The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild by Lawrence Anthony
    (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2012-05-22, Paperback)
    When South African conservationist Lawrence Anthony was asked to accept a herd of “rogue” wild elephants on his Thula Thula game reserve in Zululand, his common sense told him to refuse. But he was the herd’s last chance of survival: they would be killed if he wouldn’t take them. In order to save their lives, Anthony took them in. In the years that followed he became a part of their family. And as he battled to create a bond with the elephants, he came to realize that they had a great deal to teach him about life, loyalty, and freedom. The Elephant Whisperer is a heartwarming, exciting, funny, and sometimes sad account of Anthony’s experiences with these huge yet sympathetic creatures. Set against the background of life on an African game reserve, with unforgettable characters and exotic wildlife, it is a delightful book that will appeal to animal lovers and adventurous souls everywhere.

     

  14. Open City: A Novel by Teju Cole
    (Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2012-01-17, Paperback)
    A haunting novel about identity, dislocation, and history, Teju Cole’s Open City is a profound work by an important new author who has much to say about our country and our world.   Along the streets of Manhattan, a young Nigerian doctor named Julius wanders, reflecting on his relationships, his recent breakup with his girlfriend, his present, his past. He encounters people from different cultures and classes who will provide insight on his journey—which takes him to Brussels, to the Nigeria of his youth, and into the most unrecognizable facets of his own soul.

     

  15. Love, Life, and Elephants: An African Love Story by Daphne Sheldrick
    (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012-05-08, Hardcover)
    Daphne Sheldrick, whose family arrived in Africa from Scotland in the 1820s, is the first person ever to have successfully hand-reared newborn elephants. Her deep empathy and understanding, her years of observing Kenya’s rich variety of wildlife, and her pioneering work in perfecting the right husbandry and milk formula have saved countless elephants, rhinos, and other baby animals from certain death. In this heartwarming and poignant memoir, Daphne shares her amazing relationships with a host of orphans, including her first love, Bushy, a liquid-eyed antelope; Rickey-Tickey-Tavey, the little dwarf mongoose; Gregory Peck, the busy buffalo weaver bird; Huppety, the mischievous zebra; and the majestic elephant Eleanor, with whom Daphne has shared more than forty years of great friendship.  But this is also a magical and heartbreaking human love story between Daphne and David Sheldrick, the famous Tsavo Park warden. It was their deep and passionate love, David’s extraordinary insight into all aspects of nature, and the tragedy of his early death that inspired Daphne’s vast array of achievements, most notably the founding of the world-renowned David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and the Orphans’ Nursery in Nairobi National Park, where Daphne continues to live and work to this day.  Encompassing not only David and Daphne’s tireless campaign for an end to poaching and for conserving Kenya’s wildlife, but also their ability to engage with the human side of animals and their rearing of the orphans expressly so they can return to the wild, Love, Life, and Elephants is alive with compassion and humor, providing a rare insight into the life of one of the world’s most remarkable women.

     

  16. The Story of Beautiful Girl by Rachel Simon
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2012-02-13, Paperback)
    It is 1968. Lynnie, a young white woman with a developmental disability, and Homan, an African American deaf man, are locked away in an institution, the School for the Incurable and Feebleminded, and have been left to languish, forgotten. Deeply in love, they escape, and find refuge in the farmhouse of Martha, a retired schoolteacher and widow. But the couple is not alone-Lynnie has just given birth to a baby girl. When the authorities catch up to them that same night, Homan escapes into the darkness, and Lynnie is caught. But before she is forced back into the institution, she whispers two words to Martha: “Hide her.” And so begins the 40-year epic journey of Lynnie, Homan, Martha, and baby Julia-lives divided by seemingly insurmountable obstacles, yet drawn together by a secret pact and extraordinary love.

     

  17. Murderville 2: The Epidemic by Ashley
    (Cash Money Content, 2012-07-24, Paperback)
    New York Times best-selling authors Ashley & JaQuavis are back with the second installment in the epic Murderville Series. Love, murder, loyalty, and money fill this hood tale as they continue this international street saga. With Samad’s target on her back, Liberty must survive the harsh streets alone. but when a chance encounter pushes her into the arms of a new friend, Po, the two take on the California kingpin and step full force into the game. As bullets and sparks fly, the unlikely pair embark on a serendipitous journey back to where it all started, Sierra Leone. With a new overseas connection, Po sees an opportunity that is too good to pass up. When his pursuit of the American dream conflicts with Liberty’s past, will they be able to survive? Or will the drug empire that they’ve built together come crashing down?

     

  18. The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln by Stephen L. Carter
    (Knopf, 2012-07-10, Hardcover)
    From the best-selling author of The Emperor of Ocean Park and New England White, a daring reimagining of one of the most tumultuous moments in our nation’s past   Stephen L. Carter’s thrilling new novel takes as its starting point an alternate history: President Abraham Lincoln survives the assassination attempt at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. Two years later he is charged with overstepping his constitutional authority, both during and after the Civil War, and faces an impeachment trial . . . Twenty-one-year-old Abigail Canner is a young black woman with a degree from Oberlin, a letter of employment from the law firm that has undertaken Lincoln’s defense, and the iron-strong conviction, learned from her late mother, that “whatever limitations society might place on ordinary negroes, they would never apply to her.” And so Abigail embarks on a life that defies the norms of every stratum of Washington society: working side by side with a white clerk, meeting the great and powerful of the nation, including the president himself.  But when Lincoln’s lead counsel is found brutally murdered on the eve of the trial, Abigail is plunged into a treacherous web of intrigue and conspiracy reaching the highest levels of the divided government. Here is a vividly imagined work of historical fiction that captures the emotional tenor of post–Civil War America, a brilliantly realized courtroom drama that explores the always contentious question of the nature of presidential authority, and a galvanizing story of political suspense.

     

  19. Running for My Life: One Lost Boy’s Journey from the Killing Fields of Sudan to the Olympic Games by Lopez Lomong
    (Thomas Nelson, 2012-07-17, Hardcover)
    Running for My Life is not a story about Africa or track and field athletics. It is about outrunning the devil and achieving the impossible faith, diligence, and the desire to give back. It is the American dream come true and a stark reminder that saving one can help to save thousands more. Lopez Lomong chronicles his inspiring ascent from a barefoot lost boy of the Sudanese Civil War to a Nike sponsored athlete on the US Olympic Team. Though most of us fall somewhere between the catastrophic lows and dizzying highs of Lomong’s incredible life, every reader will find in his story the human spark to pursue dreams that might seem unthinkable, even from circumstances that might appear hopeless. “Lopez Lomong’s story is one of true inspiration. His life is a story of courage, hard work, never giving up, and having hope where there is hopelessness all around. Lopez is a true role model.” ―MICHAEL JOHNSON, Olympic Gold Medalist “This true story of a Sudanese child refugee who became an Olympic star is powerful proof that God gives hope to the hopeless and shines a light in the darkest places. Don’t be surprised if after reading this incredible tale, you find yourself mysteriously drawn to run alongside him.” ―RICHARD STEARNS, president, World Vision US and author of THe Hole in Our Gospel

     

September 2012’s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the upcoming bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. The Cutting Season: A Novel by Attica Locke
    (Harper, 2012-09-18, Hardcover)
    In Black Water Rising, Attica Locke delivered one of the most stunning and sure-handed fiction debuts in recent memory, garnering effusive critical praise, several award nominations, and passionate reader response. Now Locke returns with The Cutting Season, a riveting thriller that intertwines two murders separated across more than a century. Caren Gray manages Belle Vie, a sprawling antebellum plantation that sits between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, where the past and the present coexist uneasily. The estate’s owners have turned the place into an eerie tourist attraction, complete with full-dress re-enactments and carefully restored slave quarters. Outside the gates, a corporation with ambitious plans has been busy snapping up land from struggling families who have been growing sugar cane for generations, and now replacing local employees with illegal laborers. Tensions mount when the body of a female migrant worker is found in a shallow grave on the edge of the property, her throat cut clean. As the investigation gets under way, the list of suspects grows. But when fresh evidence comes to light and the sheriff’s department zeros in on a person of interest, Caren has a bad feeling that the police are chasing the wrong leads. Putting herself at risk, she ventures into dangerous territory as she unearths startling new facts about a very old mystery—the long-ago disappearance of a former slave—that has unsettling ties to the current murder. In pursuit of the truth about Belle Vie’s history and her own, Caren discovers secrets about both cases—ones that an increasingly desperate killer will stop at nothing to keep buried. Taut, hauntingly resonant, and beautifully written, The Cutting Season is at once a thoughtful meditation on how America reckons its past with its future, and a high-octane page-turner that unfolds with tremendous skill and vision. With her rare gift for depicting human nature in all its complexities, Attica Locke demonstrates once again that she is “destined for literary stardom” (Dallas Morning News).

     

  2. Trouble & Triumph: A Novel of Power & Beauty by Tip “T.I.” Harris
    (William Morrow, 2012-09-18, Hardcover)
    Grammy Award-winning hip-hop artist, music producer, and actor T.I. and his bestselling celebrity collaborator, David Ritz, continue the explosive story of Power and Beauty that began in the street-lit epic Power & Beauty. When his mother, Charlotte, was killed, Paul “Power” Clay and his closest friend, Tanya “Beauty” Long, fell under the spell of a savvy and ruthless Atlanta businessman named Slim, who promised to protect them. Wise beyond her years, Beauty always knew that the only person she could rely on was herself. It didn’t take long for the levelheaded young woman to recognize the simmering violence beneath Slim’s street charm. But getting away from him wasn’t easy, and it came at a heartbreaking price: turning her back on Power. Escaping to the glamorous catwalks of the Big Apple, she’s worked her breathtaking good looks and quick wit to build a thriving fashion business. Despite her success, she’s still haunted by the pain of leaving Power behind. Money and new men cannot erase the memory of the true love she denied. To Power, Slim’s world held everything he thought he wanted: women, wealth, power, authority. He discovered too late that Slim Simmons isn’t just a businessman—he’s a ruthless killer who will turn on anyone he thinks is getting in his way. He is the monster who murdered Charlotte. Now, he controls the fate of her only son. But neither Slim nor Power count on Beauty. Like Slim, she is a master who will manipulate, seduce, and sacrifice to get what she wants. She’s never let anything stop her from fulfilling her desires, and she will broker a dangerous bargain to save the only man she’s ever loved. But is saving Power worth sacrificing herself—body and soul? Will his youthful ambitions lead him to redemption—or deeper into the darkness? Will they both become everything they swore they’d never be? A tale of gangstas and sistas, money masters and politicians, that moves across the globe from Paris to New York, Atlanta to Tokyo, the Caribbean to California, Trouble & Triumph is a hip-hop mash-up of loyalty, betrayal, revenge, desire, greed, family, politics, and absolution—and of two unforgettable young star-crossed lovers from the streets who will risk everything for their dreams . . . and for each other.

     

  3. The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America by Edward J. Blum
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2012-09-21, Hardcover)
    How is it that in America the image of Jesus Christ has been used both to justify the atrocities of white supremacy and to inspire the righteousness of civil rights crusades? In The Color of Christ, Edward J. Blum and Paul Harvey weave a tapestry of American dreams and visions–from witch hunts to web pages, Harlem to Hollywood, slave cabins to South Park, Mormon revelations to Indian reservations–to show how Americans remade the Son of God visually time and again into a sacred symbol of their greatest aspirations, deepest terrors, and mightiest strivings for racial power and justice. The Color of Christ uncovers how, in a country founded by Puritans who destroyed depictions of Jesus, Americans came to believe in the whiteness of Christ. Some envisioned a white Christ who would sanctify the exploitation of Native Americans and African Americans and bless imperial expansion. Many others gazed at a messiah, not necessarily white, who was willing and able to confront white supremacy. The color of Christ still symbolizes America’s most combustible divisions, revealing the power and malleability of race and religion from colonial times to the presidency of Barack Obama.

     

  4. Every Little Thing: Based on the song ‘Three Little Birds’ by Bob Marley by Bob Marley
    (Chronicle Books, 2012-09-12, Hardcover)
    Bob Marley’s songs are known the world over for their powerful message of love, peace, and harmony. Now a whole new generation can discover one of his most joyous songs in this reassuring picture book adaptation written by his daughter Cedella and exuberantly illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton. This upbeat story reminds children that the sun will always come out after the rain and mistakes are easily forgiven with a hug. Every family will relate to this universal story of one boy who won’t let anything get him down, as long as he has the help of three very special little birds. Including all the lyrics of the original song plus new verses, this cheerful book will bring a smile to faces of all ages—because every little thing’s gonna be all right!

     

  5. A Gangster and A Gentleman by Kiki Swinson
    (Dafina, 2012-09-25, Paperback)

     

  6. Murder Was the Case by Kiki Swinson
    (Melodrama Pub, 2012-09-18, Paperback)

     

  7. Surrender to a Donovan (Kimani Romance) by A.C. Arthur
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    Sean Donovan is a man on a mission—to discover who is behind the popular relationship column that has transformed his family-owned magazine into Miami’s hippest glossy. But Tate Dennison isn’t the sassy columnist the hardworking bachelor expected. Nor is he prepared for the flash fire of passion the stunning single mother arouses.…The hunky magazine executive wants to mix business with pleasure, but Tate has one hard and fast rule: never fall for the boss! The once-burned advice columnist has no intention of becoming the devastatingly attractive playboy’s latest conquest. But what woman can resist Sean’s charms? Once she’s sampled his kisses, can Tate protect her heart—even when a sabotage plot threatens the Donovan empire and their possible future together?

     

  8. My Destiny (Arabesque) by Adrianne Byrd
    (Harlequin Kimani Arabesque, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    When it comes to matchmaking, will two longtime friends put their relationship on the line for the sake of love?For ten years lawyer Destiny Brockman saw her carefree—but very, very fine—neighbor Miles Stafford as just a good friend. After all, she was totally focused on her career and he was the type of brother who put the P in player. So when she swore up and down that there were no good men in Atlanta, Miles proposes a friendly wager. They would set each other up on a date with the perfect match. But the undeniable attraction between them that’s been simmering for years could put Destiny in danger of losing the bet…and winning the sweetest reward.

     

  9. Divine Intervention (Hallelujah Love) by Lutishia Lovely
    (Dafina, 2012-09-25, Paperback)

     

  10. Seduction’s Shift (Shadow Shifters) by A.C. Arthur
    (St. Martin’s Paperbacks, 2012-09-25, Mass Market Paperback)
    Seduction’s Shift A.C. Arthur They hide their true nature from the world—part man and part animal—sworn to defend the human race against the untamed beasts among them… She was his first love, his only love. But trying to rescue his beautiful Ary from captivity is one wild risk no man should take. Luckily, Nick Delgado is no ordinary man. His work in the urban jungle as a high-powered litigator has only fueled his ferocity, enflamed his passion—and sharpened his claws—to protect his mate. Ary is a born healer who has devoted her life to the tribe—and her heart to Nick. But when the fierce  and sadistic Sabar turns his jaguar eyes upon her, Ary becomes the unwilling pawn in a deadly game of shifting alliances. One man wants to use her talents to enslave humanity. The other wants to free her from their natural enemy. If Nick hopes to save Ary, he must unleash the beast within—and fight for the woman he loves…

     

  11. The Fire of Freedom: Abraham Galloway and the Slaves’ Civil War by David S. Cecelski
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2012-09-29, Hardcover)
    Abraham H. Galloway (1837-70) was a fiery young slave rebel, radical abolitionist, and Union spy who rose out of bondage to become one of the most significant and stirring black leaders in the South during the Civil War. Throughout his brief, mercurial life, Galloway fought against slavery and injustice. He risked his life behind enemy lines, recruited black soldiers for the North, and fought racism in the Union army’s ranks. He also stood at the forefront of an African American political movement that flourished in the Union-occupied parts of North Carolina, even leading a historic delegation of black southerners to the White House to meet with President Lincoln and to demand the full rights of citizenship. He later became one of the first black men elected to the North Carolina legislature. Long hidden from history, Galloway’s story reveals a war unfamiliar to most of us. As David Cecelski writes, “Galloway’s Civil War was a slave insurgency, a war of liberation that was the culmination of generations of perseverance and faith.” This riveting portrait illuminates Galloway’s life and deepens our insight into the Civil War and Reconstruction as experienced by African Americans in the South.

     

  12. Pym: A Novel by Mat Johnson
    (Spiegel & Grau, 2012-09-04, Paperback)
    “THE SHARPEST AND MOST UNUSUAL STORY I READ LAST YEAR . . . [Mat] Johnson’s satirical vision roves as freely as Kurt Vonnegut’s and is colored with the same sort of passionate humanitarianism.”—Maud Newton, New York Times MagazineNAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • Vanity Fair • Houston Chronicle • The Seattle Times • Salon • National Post • The A.V. Club  Recently canned professor of American literature Chris Jaynes has just made a startling discovery: the manuscript of a crude slave narrative that confirms the reality of Edgar Allan Poe’s strange and only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. Determined to seek out Tsalal, the remote island of pure and utter blackness that Poe describes, Jaynes convenes an all-black crew of six to follow Pym’s trail to the South Pole, armed with little but the firsthand account from which Poe derived his seafaring tale, a bag of bones, and a stash of Little Debbie snack cakes. Thus begins an epic journey by an unlikely band of adventurers under the permafrost of Antarctica, beneath the surface of American history, and behind one of literature’s great mysteries.   “Outrageously entertaining, [Pym] brilliantly re-imagines and extends Edgar Allan Poe’s enigmatic and unsettling Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. . . . Part social satire, part meditation on race in America, part metafiction and, just as important, a rollicking fantasy adventure . . . reminiscent of Philip Roth in its seemingly effortless blend of the serious, comic and fantastic.”—Michael Dirda, The Washington Post“Blisteringly funny.”—Laura Miller, Salon“Relentlessly entertaining.”—The New York Times Book Review “Imagine Kurt Vonnegut having a beer with Ralph Ellison and Jules Verne.”—Vanity Fair “Screamingly funny . . . Reading Pym is like opening a big can of whoop-ass and then marveling—gleefully—at all the mayhem that ensues.”—Houston Chronicle

     

  13. Ancient Nubia: African Kingdoms on the Nile by
    (The American University in Cairo Press, 2012-09-06, Hardcover)
    For most of the modern world, ancient Nubia seems an unknown and enigmatic land. Only a handful of archaeologists have studied its history or unearthed the Nubian cities, temples, and cemeteries that once dotted the landscape of southern Egypt and northern Sudan. Nubia’s remote setting in the midst of an inhospitable desert, with access by river blocked by impassable rapids, has lent it not only an air of mystery, but also isolated it from exploration. Over the past century, particularly during this last generation, scholars have begun to focus more attention on the fascinating cultures of ancient Nubia, ironically prompted by the construction of large dams that have flooded vast tracts of the ancient land.This book attempts to document some of what has recently been discovered about ancient Nubia, with its remarkable history, architecture, and culture, and thereby to give us a picture of this rich, but unfamiliar, African legacy.

     

  14. Between Heaven and Here by Susan Straight
    (McSweeney’s, 2012-09-12, Hardcover)
    In August in Rio Seco, California, the ground is too hard to bury a body. But Glorette Picard is dead, and across the canal, out in the orange groves, they’ll gather shovels and pickaxes and soak the dirt until they can lay her coffin down. First, someone needs to find her son Victor, who memorizes SAT words to avoid the guys selling rock, and someone needs to tell her uncle Enrique, who will be the one to hunt down her killer, and someone needs to brush out her perfect crown of hair and paint her cracked toenails. As the residents of this dry-creek town prepare to bury their own, it becomes clear that Glorette’s life and death are deeply entangled with the dark history of the city and the untouchable beauty that, finally, killed her.

     

  15. Living Color: The Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color by Nina G. Jablonski
    (University of California Press, 2012-09-27, Hardcover)
    Living Color is the first book to investigate the social history of skin color from prehistory to the present, showing how our body’s most visible trait influences our social interactions in profound and complex ways. In a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion, Nina G. Jablonski begins with the biology and evolution of skin pigmentation, explaining how skin color changed as humans moved around the globe. She explores the relationship between melanin pigment and sunlight, and examines the consequences of rapid migrations, vacations, and other lifestyle choices that can create mismatches between our skin color and our environment.Richly illustrated, this book explains why skin color has come to be a biological trait with great social meaning– a product of evolution perceived by culture. It considers how we form impressions of others, how we create and use stereotypes, how negative stereotypes about dark skin developed and have played out through history–including being a basis for the transatlantic slave trade. Offering examples of how attitudes about skin color differ in the U.S., Brazil, India, and South Africa, Jablonski suggests that a knowledge of the evolution and social importance of skin color can help eliminate color-based discrimination and racism.

     

  16. Lesson in Romance (Kimani Romance) by Harmony Evans
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    Alex Dovington is a man with a secret. The internationally famous jazz musician never learned to read. If the world—and his legions of fans—knew, it would be a disaster. When he learns Cara Williams has been hired to teach him, he is reluctant to follow the plan. The sultry teacher will be given only three days to teach the music legend everything she knows. But the instructor becomes the student when Alex turns their mountaintop classroom into a sensual duet of passion.Cara will do anything to keep the doors of her Harlem literacy center open. Even tutor the scandalously handsome saxophone player at his romantic weekend retreat. Alex may be schooling her in the fine art of lovemaking, but Cara has her own secret—one that could tear them apart forever.…

     

  17. After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa by Douglas Foster
    (Liveright, 2012-09-10, Hardcover)
    The most important historical and journalistic portrait to date of a teetering nation whose destiny will determine the fate of a continent.A brutally honest exposé, After Mandela provides a sobering portrait of a country caught between a democratic future and a political meltdown. Recent works have focused primarily on Nelson Mandela’s transcendent story. But Douglas Foster, a leading South Africa authority with early, unprecedented access to President Zuma and to the next generation in the Mandela family, traces the nation’s entire post-apartheid arc, from its celebrated beginnings under “Madiba” to Thabo Mbeki’s tumultuous rule to the ferocious battle between Mbeki and Jacob Zuma. Foster tells this story not only from the point of view of the emerging black elite but also, drawing on hundreds of rare interviews over a six-year period, from the perspectives of ordinary citizens, including an HIV-infected teenager living outside Johannesburg and a homeless orphan in Cape Town. This is the long-awaited, revisionist account of a country whose recent history has been not just neglected but largely ignored by the West. 8 pages of illustrations

     

  18. Champagne Kisses (Kimani Romance) by Zuri Day
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    An heir to Southern California’s most fabled vineyard, Donovan Drake works as hard as he plays. Betrayed by love in the past, the consummate bachelor prides himself on never committing to one woman. But Marissa Hayes isn’t just any woman. And Donovan has just two weeks to show the guarded, voluptuous beauty exactly what she’s been missing.…Falling for her boss is number one on Marissa’s list of don’ts. But from the moment she experiences Donovan’s intoxicating touch, her heart tells her something else. Slowly but surely, his seduction is breaking down her defenses. Is their passion as fleeting as her brief stay at Donovan’s fabulous resort? Or have they found a love as timeless as the finest wine—strong enough to withstand anything, even a threat from Marissa’s past?

     

  19. Evidence of Desire (Kimani Romance) by Pamela Yaye
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    Azure Ellison may have undergone a total makeover, but she never expects to be romanced by Harper Hamilton, her former prep school friend. The ambitious journalist is after a career-making story about Harper’s powerful Philadelphia family. But the charismatic attorney wants something from Azure in return: her vow to become his lawful wife in a marriage of convenience!Harper can’t believe the girl he once knew has transformed into this stunning, successful beauty. The longtime bachelor has his own reasons for proposing, but Azure has awakened a desire he’s determined to consummate. With the paparazzi eager for the wedding of the year, Harper is ready to start his honeymoon. Until a breaking scandal about the Hamilton dynasty threatens his marriage to the woman he now wants to have and to hold forever…

     

  20. One Day I Will Write About This Place: A Memoir by Binyavanga Wainaina
    (Graywolf Press, 2012-09-04, Paperback)
    “A Kenyan Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man . . . suffused by a love affair with language.”—Publishers Weekly, Top Ten Books of 2011In this vivid and compelling memoir, Binyavanga Wainaina tumbles through his middle-class Kenyan childhood out of kilter with the world around him. In One Day I Will Write About This Place, named a 2011 New York Times notable book, Wainaina brilliantly evokes family, tribe, and nationhood in joyous, ecstatic language.

     

All I Ever Wanted (Grayson Friends series, Book 8) by Francis Ray

A new novel from  New York Times and USA Today author Francis Ray. The Grayson Friends contemporary romance series  book 8, All I Ever Wanted will be released on February 26, 2013.

 

Naomi Reese is a divorced mother with a small daughter named Kayla, a new life in Sante Fe, and, finally, some distance from her abusive ex-husband. All she wants now is a home of her own where she and Kayla can finally feel safe. With one bad marriage behind her, she can’t even dream of falling in love again. Until she meets Richard…

A tall, handsome veterinarian with a warm smile and big heart, Richard Youngblood is the kind of man any woman could fall for. Not only does he have a wonderful way with animals, he’s great with little Kayla and—Naomi has to admit—he’s easy on the eyes. Richard definitely has his sights set on her, too. But first, Naomi has to free herself from her past—and learn how to love again—before she can have all she ever wanted with the man of her dreams…

All I Ever Wanted will be available February 26, 2013.

8th Annual African American Literary Award Show, September 27

The 8th Annual African American Literary Award Show will be hosted by celebrated award-winning actor Isaiah Washington. The event will take place in New York City on Thursday, September 27, 2012 from 6 pm – 11 pm at Melba’s Restaurant located at 163 West 125th Street & Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. 3rd floor.
Join us as we pay tribute to your favorite authors, publishers and book clubs as voted on by you, the fans.

Purchase your tickets before Sept 7 and take advantage of our special early bird discount of only $65. Ticket price includes cocktail reception, dinner, program guide and gift bag.

SPECIAL VIP TICKETS (ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER AVAILABLE)
A limited number of VIP tickets will be available on a first-come, first- served basis for a special price of only $100. VIP pass includes all of the above plus:
* Admission to our special Pre-VIP cocktail reception featuring Isaiah Washington, celebrity guests and many of your favorite authors.
* Guaranteed dinner seating at the VIP table of one of your favorite nominated authors
* Special deluxe gift bag!
Hurry, only 20 VIP passes available!
Tickets:
Early Bird Special! $65 before Sept 7
$75 after Sept 7
$85 (cash) at the door
$100 VIP tickets


African American Literary Awards Show

The AALAS Awards is the first of its kind. It is the most comprehensive awards show ever to recognize, honor, celebrate and promote the outstanding achievements and contributions that authors and writers make to the publishing, arts and entertainment industries

History of African American Literary Awards Show
The African American Literary Award show is the brainchild of Yvette Hayward, president of Y. Hayward, Inc., a public relations company that has been a powerful resource in the literary field for over a decade.

Black Authors and Readers Rock, October 19-20, Maryland

The Reading Divas presents its 5th Annual Literary Event — The First BLACK AUTHORS & READERS ROCK WEEKEND!

Friday & Saturday October 19 & 20, 2012
at the Metro Points Hotel
8500 Annapolis Road, New Carrollton, MD

Friday 7 -11 pm
Reception/Book Club Meeting including the Book Launch of “An Angry Ass Black Woman” by Karen Quinones Miller​ and a Book Club Meeting featuring Pamela Samuels Young‘s latest novel, “Attorney Client Privilege.”

An Angry-Ass Black Woman by Karen E. Quinones Miller
Gallery Books/Karen Hunter Publishing
Available October 2, 2012 in Paperback

This sassy, shocking autobiographical novel captures the racial tensions, the hardships, and the bonds that formed between families and neighbors growing up poor in Harlem.

The Essence bestselling author of Uptown Dreams delivers a fictionalized look at the life she lived before she achieved success as an established writer. “Ke-Ke” (Kay-Kay) grew up on 117th Street in extreme poverty. After an accident leaves her in a coma in her late forties, her beloved family around her in the hospital, she remembers moments from her childhood and the events that would later shape her desires to get out of Harlem and make something of herself. Her sometimes poignant and sometimes hilarious memories — like trying to rob the landlord to pay her family’s back rent — are interspersed with her present-day family’s concerns for her health. Filled with vibrant anecdotes about childhood in Harlem and her journey from dropping out of school, to re-entering and graduating from college, becoming a journalist and then an author, Miller showcases the love experienced by her family and neighbors and the bond secured between them as part of their common upbringing.

When a hotshot L.A. lawyer takes on a corporation with a long history of discriminating against women, her quest for justice is hindered by a brutal murder, missing documents and an unscrupulous opposing counsel.

Goldman House Publishing
Available June 9, 2012 in Paperback

Saturday Morning 9-11:45
Workshops/Panels:

  • Is Urban Lit Really Literature
  • So You Wanna Write
  • What Impact has the Ebook had on Black Publishing
  • How to Start, Improve and Get the Most Out of Your Book Club

Noon Luncheon 12-3
Featuring Mary Monroe

God Don’t Make No Mistakes by Mary Monroe

Available by Dafina on June 1, 2012 in Hardcover

In the sparkling conclusion to Mary Monroe‘s bestselling God series, two forever friends face their biggest betrayals yet and learn the hard way that putting your trust in the wrong hands can change your life forever!

These days, Annette Goode Davis has a pretty full plate–literally and figuratively. Although she’s trying to reconcile with her husband, Pee Wee, she’s still seeing other men on the side. A woman’s got to cover her bases, right? With her love life hopping, Annette should be as pleased as punch. Instead, the stress has her eating everything in sight and packing on the pounds along the way.

Meanwhile, Annette’s best friend, Rhoda O’Toole, has her hands full–as usual–dealing with her wild child daughter. Jade has always been a cross to bear, but when her antics almost cost Rhoda her man, Rhoda throws Jade out on the street. But Jade soon finds a way to make Rhoda regret her choice.

Privately, Annette thanks her lucky stars that her daughter, Charlotte, has her head on straight. And she’s been doubly blessed to have a strait-laced neighbor look after Charlotte when she’s caught up in Pee Wee and Rhoda’s many problems. But when Annette’s world is rocked by a terrible revelation, she’ll discover that appearances can be very, very deceiving–and she’ll have to summon every ounce of strength she has to protect the ones she loves.

Early Bird Tickets/(after 9/15)
Friday Only – $20/($30)
Saturday Only – $40/($50)
Combined Ticket – $55/($75)

Click on link below to buy tickets!
www.readersrock.eventbrite.com
or send certified check or money order to

The Reading Divas
P O Box 102, Glenndale, MD 20769

Make it a weekend event!
Call for your reservations at Metro Points – (301) 459-6700

21st Annual African American Children’s Book Fair, Philadelphia

21st Annual African American Children’s Book Fair
February 2, 2013
1-3 p.m.

Gymnasium of the Community College of Philadelphia
17th & Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, PA.

The Book Fair started out on a cold frosty day at John Wanamaker Department Store and is now one of the oldest and largest single day events for African American Children’s Books in the country. The success of the program is due to the fact that we offer the best and the brightest from the African American Children’s literary community. Parents, caregivers, and educators from the tri-state area are very supportive of the event. They all understand that children who read make more responsible decisions about their lifestyles.
The event is free and opened to the public.

Author and illustrators will make presentations from their books; also games, prizes, promotional give-aways and reading resources will be available. A wide selection of African American books to purchase will be featured at the event.

For more information about next year’s book fair, email Vanesse Lloyd-Sgambati at vlloydsgam@aol.com or call (215) 878-BOOK

1835 WYNNEWOOD ROAD
PHILADELPHIA, PA 19151

http://theafricanamericanchildrensbookproject.org/

2012 Mosaic Literary Conference

The Mosaic Literary Conference presents creative ways for keeping books and reading valuable sources of knowledge and creativity. The conference is a day of professional-development workshops that helps high-school educators incorporate literature into existing curricula to further explore course work focused on culture and history.

Friday & Saturday
November 9 & 10, 2012

Hostos Community College
450 Grand Concourse
Bronx NY 10451

MLC is presented by the Literary Freedom Project, a 501(c)3 tax-exempt not-for-profit arts organization that supports the literary arts through education, creative thinking, and new media.

For more information, see http://mlc2012.org/.

2012 Book Extravaganza, Norwalk, CA

On October 20, 2012, CLF Publishing, Inc. will sponsor the 2012 Book Extravaganza.

This event is designed to promote literacy by showcasing books written by authors from across the country. Authors of children’s books, how-to books, faith-based books, poetry, autobiographies, fiction, and non-fiction will be present to showcase and sell their books. Come out to this event and hear from the authors as they describe their books.

If you are an author or a book reader, you are invited to the event at the DoubleTree Hotel located at 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650. The event will be held from 9am-3 pm. The event is free to the public and hotel parking is free. For more information regarding this event, go online to www.clfpublishing.org.

July 2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the upcoming bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. Checkmate – The Baddest Chick by Nisa Santiago
    (Melodrama Publishing, 2012-07-03, Paperback)
    The Baddest Chick Motto: Your time at the top is short-lived. Enjoy it while you can. Kola, the reigning Queen of New York, has Harlem on lock and is making paper hand over fist. If the stresses of hustling hard weren’t enough, the love of her life is mixed up with a Brooklyn chick, a bounty has been put on her head for a hit she didn’t sanction, and her sister’s ex-man, Chico, is trying to rock her to sleep. Kola has 99 problems, but Apple ain’t one. Apple, gone but not forgotten while trapped in a Mexican hellhole, is still the most hated chick in New York. She’s low on friends and can’t seem to climb back up on her pedestal. With revenge in her heart and murder on her mind, Apple attempts to overcome her situation just in time to reclaim her title as The Baddest Chick the world has ever seen.

     

  2. The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln by Stephen L. Carter
    (Knopf, 2012-07-10, Hardcover)
    From the best-selling author of The Emperor of Ocean Park and New England White, a daring reimagining of one of the most tumultuous moments in our nation’s past   Stephen L. Carter’s thrilling new novel takes as its starting point an alternate history: President Abraham Lincoln survives the assassination attempt at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. Two years later he is charged with overstepping his constitutional authority, both during and after the Civil War, and faces an impeachment trial . . . Twenty-one-year-old Abigail Canner is a young black woman with a degree from Oberlin, a letter of employment from the law firm that has undertaken Lincoln’s defense, and the iron-strong conviction, learned from her late mother, that “whatever limitations society might place on ordinary negroes, they would never apply to her.” And so Abigail embarks on a life that defies the norms of every stratum of Washington society: working side by side with a white clerk, meeting the great and powerful of the nation, including the president himself.  But when Lincoln’s lead counsel is found brutally murdered on the eve of the trial, Abigail is plunged into a treacherous web of intrigue and conspiracy reaching the highest levels of the divided government. Here is a vividly imagined work of historical fiction that captures the emotional tenor of post–Civil War America, a brilliantly realized courtroom drama that explores the always contentious question of the nature of presidential authority, and a galvanizing story of political suspense.

     

  3. Murderville 2: The Epidemic (Murderville Trilogy) by Ashley Coleman
    (Cash Money Content, 2012-07-24, Paperback)
    New York Times best-selling authors Ashley & JaQuavis are back with the second installment in the epic Murderville Series. Love, murder, loyalty, and money fill this hood tale as they continue this international street saga. With Samad’s target on her back, Liberty must survive the harsh streets alone. but when a chance encounter pushes her into the arms of a new friend, Po, the two take on the California kingpin and step full force into the game. As bullets and sparks fly, the unlikely pair embark on a serendipitous journey back to where it all started, Sierra Leone. With a new overseas connection, Po sees an opportunity that is too good to pass up. When his pursuit of the American dream conflicts with Liberty’s past, will they be able to survive? Or will the drug empire that they’ve built together come crashing down?

     

  4. Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America by Tanner Colby
    (Viking Adult, 2012-07-05, Hardcover)
    An incisive and candid look at how America got lost on the way to Dr. King’s Promised LandAlmost fifty years after Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, equality is the law of the land, but actual integration is still hard to find. Mammoth battles over forced busing, unfair housing practices, and affirmative action have hardly helped. The bleak fact is that black people and white people in the United States don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or anywhere. Tanner Colby, himself a child of a white-flight Southern suburb, set out to discover why.Some of My Best Friends Are Black chronicles America’s troubling relationship with race through four interrelated stories: the transformation of a once-racist Birmingham school system; a Kansas City neighborhood’s fight against housing discrimination; the curious racial divide of the Madison Avenue ad world; and a Louisiana Catholic parish’s forty-year effort to build an integrated church. Writing with a reporter’s nose and a stylist’s flair, Colby uncovers the deep emotional fault lines set trembling by race and takes an unflinching look at an America still struggling to reach the mountaintop.

     

  5. The Expendable Man (New York Review Books Classics) by Dorothy B. Hughes, afterword by Walter Mosley
    (NYRB Classics, 2012-07-03, Paperback)
    “It was surprising what old experiences remembered could do to a presumably educated, civilized man.” And Hugh Denismore, a young doctor driving his mother’s Cadillac from Los Angeles to Phoenix, is eminently educated and civilized. He is privileged, would seem to have the world at his feet, even. Then why does the sight of a few redneck teenagers disconcert him? Why is he reluctant to pick up a disheveled girl hitchhiking along the desert highway? And why is he the first person the police suspect when she is found dead in Arizona a few days later?Dorothy B. Hughes ranks with Raymond Chandler and Patricia Highsmith as a master of mid-century noir. In books like In a Lonely Place and Ride the Pink Horse she exposed a seething discontent underneath the veneer of twentieth-century prosperity. With The Expendable Man, first published in 1963, Hughes upends the conventions of the wrong-man narrative to deliver a story that engages readers even as it implicates them in the greatest of all American crimes.

     

  6. Snow-Storm in August: Washington City, Francis Scott Key, and the Forgotten Race Riot of 1835 by Jefferson Morley
    (Nan A. Talese, 2012-07-03, Hardcover)
    A gripping narrative history of the explosive events that drew together Francis Scott Key, Andrew Jackson, and an 18-year-old slave on trial for attempted murder. In 1835, the city of Washington pulsed with change. As newly freed African Americans from the South poured in, free blacks outnumbered slaves for the first time. Radical notions of abolishing slavery circulated on the city’s streets, and white residents were forced to confront new ideas of what the nation’s future might look like.On the night of August 4th, Arthur Bowen, an eighteen-year-old slave, stumbled into the bedroom where his owner, Anna Thornton, slept. He had an ax in the crook of his arm. An alarm was raised, and he ran away. Word of the incident spread rapidly, and within days, Washington’s first race riot exploded, as whites fearing a slave rebellion attacked the property of the free blacks. Residents dubbed the event the “Snow-Storm,” in reference to the central role of Beverly Snow, a flamboyant former slave turned successful restaurateur, who became the target of the mob’s rage.In the wake of the riot came two sensational criminal trials that gripped the city. Prosecuting both cases was none other than Francis Scott Key, a politically ambitious attorney famous for writing the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner,” who few now remember served as the city’s district attorney for eight years. Key defended slavery until the twilight’s last gleaming, and pandered to racial fears by seeking capital punishment for Arthur Bowen. But in a surprise twist his prosecution was thwarted by Arthur’s ostensible victim, Anna Thornton, a respected socialite who sought the help of President Andrew Jackson.Ranging beyond the familiar confines of the White House and the Capitol, Snow-Storm in August delivers readers into an unknown chapter of American history with a textured and absorbing account of the racial secrets and contradictions that coursed beneath the freewheeling capital of a rising world power.”Snow-Storm in August is the sort of book I most love to read: history so fresh it feels alive, yet introducing me to a time and place that I had little known or utterly misunderstood. After reading Jefferson Morley’s vibrant account, one can never hear ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ the same way again.”—David Maraniss, author of Barack Obama: The Story

     

  7. When Sunday Comes Again by Terry E. Hill
    (Kensington, 2012-07-01, Paperback)

     

  8. Tell Me No Secrets by Nikki Michelle
    (Kensington, 2012-07-01, Paperback)

     

  9. Beautiful, Dirty, Rich: A Novel by J. D. Mason
    (St. Martin’s Press, 2012-07-03, Hardcover)
    A gripping new novel from bestselling author J.D. Mason about a wealthy Texas family and the one woman who holds— and will reveal—all their dirty secrets  Desdimona Green has been the name on everyone’s lips in Blink, Texas. Twenty-five years ago, at the age of eighteen, she shot and killed one of the wealthiest men and pillars of the community, oil baron Julian Gatewood. The Gatewood family was considered untouchable, so the whole state of Texas was rocked to its core over Julian’s murder. They were even more shocked to discover that Desi is Julian’s daughter and her mother had been his lover for years. But when Desi gets out of jail and promptly inherits millions from Julian’s estate, everyone knows that there is much more to the story—and Desi Green is the keeper of the Gatewood secrets, including what happened the night J ulian died. When a famous true crime reporter shows up on her doorstep wanting the full story, Desi agrees to reveal all, much to the horror of the Gatewoods, who will do anything to stop her. But Desi has more than a few tricks up her sleeve…

     

  10. American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America) by Robert O. Self
    (Princeton University Press, 2012-07-01, Paperback)
    As the birthplace of the Black Panthers and a nationwide tax revolt, California embodied a crucial motif of the postwar United States: the rise of suburbs and the decline of cities, a process in which black and white histories inextricably joined. American Babylon tells this story through Oakland and its nearby suburbs, tracing both the history of civil rights and black power politics as well as the history of suburbanization and home-owner politics. Robert Self shows that racial inequities in both New Deal and Great Society liberalism precipitated local struggles over land, jobs, taxes, and race within postwar metropolitan development. Black power and the tax revolt evolved together, in tension.American Babylon demonstrates that the history of civil rights and black liberation politics in California did not follow a southern model, but represented a long-term struggle for economic rights that began during the World War II years and continued through the rise of the Black Panthers in the late 1960s. This struggle yielded a wide-ranging and profound critique of postwar metropolitan development and its foundation of class and racial segregation. Self traces the roots of the 1978 tax revolt to the 1940s, when home owners, real estate brokers, and the federal government used racial segregation and industrial property taxes to forge a middle-class lifestyle centered on property ownership.Using the East Bay as a starting point, Robert Self gives us a richly detailed, engaging narrative that uniquely integrates the most important racial liberation struggles and class politics of postwar America.

     

  11. Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?: What It Means to Be Black Now by Touré
    (Free Press, 2012-07-10, Paperback)
    In this provocative book, writer and cultural critic Touré explores the concept of Post-Blackness: the ability for someone to be rooted in but not restricted by their race. Drawing on his own experiences and those of 105 luminaries, he argues that racial identity should be understood as fluid, complex, and self-determined.

     

  12. Keeping Score by Regina Hart
    (Kensington, 2012-07-01, Paperback)
    To be a pro b-ball champion takes endless drive and passion. But being a winner on the court can often mean losing off the court. . .He’s an NBA legend, considered the best of the best. Now veteran player Warrick Evans is determined to lead his team all the way to the championship. It’s his last shot before he retires, but the media can’t get enough of his story–and all the attention is turning his teammates against him, not to mention his wife. . .Dr. Marilyn Devry-Evans has always stood by her man, even when it meant standing in his shadow. Now she wants to focus on her own career, and on scoring her own dream job. But with the spotlight bearing down on them, Marilyn is reaching her breaking point. Especially when a secret comes to light–one that could destroy not only her career, but her marriage. . . Praise for Regina Hart”Sexy, fun, and fast-paced. . .a slam dunk!” –Kate Angell on Fast Break

     

  13. Sites of Slavery: Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post–Civil Rights Imagination by Salamishah Tillet
    (Duke University Press Books, 2012-07-19, Paperback)
    More than forty years after the major victories of the civil rights movement, African Americans have a vexed relation to the civic myth of the United States as the land of equal opportunity and justice for all. In Sites of Slavery Salamishah Tillet examines how contemporary African American artists and intellectuals – including Annette Gordon-Reed, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Bill T. Jones, Carrie Mae Weems, and Kara Walker – turn to the subject of slavery in order to understand and challenge the ongoing exclusion of African Americans from the founding narratives of the United States. She explains how they reconstruct “sites of slavery” – contested figures, events, memories, locations, and experiences related to chattel slavery – such as the allegations of a sexual relationship between Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings, the characters Uncle Tom and Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, African American tourism to slave forts in Ghana and Senegal, and the legal challenges posed by reparations movements. By claiming and recasting these sites of slavery, contemporary artists and intellectuals provide slaves with an interiority and subjectivity denied them in American history, register the civic estrangement experienced by African Americans in the post-civil rights era, and envision a more fully realized American democracy.

     

  14. Floyd Patterson: The Fighting Life of Boxing’s Invisible Champion by W. K. Stratton
    (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012-07-10, Hardcover)
    A well-researched and overdue tribute. Like one of Patterson’s reliable left hooks, Stratton sharply recounts the life of an important, but often forgotten, two-time world heavyweight champion. — Gary Andrew Poole, author of PacMan: Behind the Scenes with Manny PacquiaoIn 1956, Floyd Patterson became, at age twenty-one, the youngest boxer to claim the title of world heavyweight champion. Later, he was the first ever to lose and regain that honor. Here, the acclaimed author W. K. Stratton chronicles the life of “the Gentle Gladiator” — an athlete overshadowed by Ali’s theatrics and Liston’s fearsome reputation, and a civil rights activist overlooked in the Who’s Who of race politics. From the Gramercy Gym and wildcard manager Cus D’Amato to the final rematch against Ali in 1972, Patterson’s career spanned boxing’s golden age. He won an Olympic gold medal, had bouts with Marciano and Johansson, and was interviewed by James Baldwin, Gay Talese, and Budd Schulberg. A complex, misunderstood figure — he once kissed an opponent at the end of a match — he was known for his peekaboo stance and soft-spoken nature. Floyd Patterson was boxing’s invisible champion, but in this deeply researched and beautifully written biography he comes vividly to life and is finally given his due — as one of the most artful boxers of his time and as one of our great sportsmen, a man who shaped the world in and out of the ring.

     

  15. White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America) by Kevin M. Kruse
    (Princeton University Press, 2012-07-01, Paperback)
    During the civil rights era, Atlanta thought of itself as “The City Too Busy to Hate,” a rare place in the South where the races lived and thrived together. Over the course of the 1960s and 1970s, however, so many whites fled the city for the suburbs that Atlanta earned a new nickname: “The City Too Busy Moving to Hate.”In this reappraisal of racial politics in modern America, Kevin Kruse explains the causes and consequences of “white flight” in Atlanta and elsewhere. Seeking to understand segregationists on their own terms, White Flight moves past simple stereotypes to explore the meaning of white resistance. In the end, Kruse finds that segregationist resistance, which failed to stop the civil rights movement, nevertheless managed to preserve the world of segregation and even perfect it in subtler and stronger forms.Challenging the conventional wisdom that white flight meant nothing more than a literal movement of whites to the suburbs, this book argues that it represented a more important transformation in the political ideology of those involved. In a provocative revision of postwar American history, Kruse demonstrates that traditional elements of modern conservatism, such as hostility to the federal government and faith in free enterprise, underwent important transformations during the postwar struggle over segregation. Likewise, white resistance gave birth to several new conservative causes, like the tax revolt, tuition vouchers, and privatization of public services. Tracing the journey of southern conservatives from white supremacy to white suburbia, Kruse locates the origins of modern American politics.

     

  16. The Other Side of Goodness by Vanessa Davis Griggs
    (Dafina, 2012-07-31, Paperback)

     

2012 NAACP Author Pavilion – Houston, July 7-10

The NAACP Author Pavilion is sponsored by the NAACP National Office and Managed by The Oracle Group.
Founded in 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. Its more than half-million adult and youth members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities and monitors of equal opportunity in the public and private sectors.

The Oracle Group specializes in creating literary events in a variety of non-traditional venues and seeks out exciting new locales for readers and authors to connect. PBE is the sister company to The Oracle Group which produces the literary talk show “In the Café with Mocha”

http://naacpauthorpavilion.org/

Article: Why 88% of books reviewed by The New York Times are written by white authors

by Amanda Hess
Published June 11, 2012 6:50 am
Updated June 11, 2012 7:21 am

Last week, The Rumpus published a piece by Roxane Gay titled “Where Things Stand,” in which Gay reported that nearly 90 percent of books reviewed in The New York Times are written by whites. Gay researched the racial background of every author critiqued by the paper in 2011. She yielded predictably striking results: 31 black authors, 655 white ones. Eighty-one reviewed books in all by writers of color. “I don’t know how to solve this problem or what to do with this information,” wrote Gay, who is black. Still. “I like knowing where things stand.”

http://www.poynter.org/latest-news/top-stories/176705/why-88-of-books-reviewed-by-the-new-york-times-are-written-by-white-authors/

The Shine On Summer Reading Book Fair in Washington, DC, June 23, 2012

The Shine On Summer Reading Book Fair
When: June 23, 2012 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Where: Shiloh Baptist Church, Washington, DC

Sponsored: Shiloh Baptist Church; Urban Leadership Institute; Hurston Wright Foundation: Alliance for Black Literature & Entertainment (ABLE); Burgess Publishing

The goal of the Shine On Summer Reading Book Fair is the shine a light on the importance of summer reading for Washington DC- area children and families.

Most U.S. students go to school for 180 days during the year and enjoy more than two months of time off every summer. Research shows that many students experience learning loss when they do not engage in academic enrichment activities over the summer. Reading achievement loss can be significant, and when students start school in the fall they often struggle to catch up.

~~Give aways, entertainment & featured children’s book authors~~

Authors include:
Charisse Carney Nunes
Ralph Burgess
David Miller
Chu Onwuachi-Saunders, MD

Special appearances by NAACP Image Award nominated
children’s author, Kwame Alexander; storyteller & Griot Baba-C; and many more surprises.

Featured group Watoto from the Nile

2012 African American Pavilion at BookExpo, New York, June 6

Amber Communications Group Inc’s 2012 African American Pavilion Booth at BookExpo America booth will be hosting a special “Welcome to BookExpo America Michael Baisden” Reception and Booksigning for the internationally renowned author, radio and television talk show personality, and a Celebration and Booksigning of New York Times and Essence Magazine Best-Selling Author Zane and the Strebor Books Legacy, at the Jacob Javits Convention Center, New York City, Wednesday, June 6, 2012, 1:00pm – 5:00pm in the ACGI African American Pavilion Booth. The event will be coordinated by Heather Covington of Disilgold.com, Troy Johnson of AALBC.com and Charisse and Harvey Nunes of The Book Look.

Michael Baisden is undeniably one of the most influential and engaging personalities in broadcast history. The show is syndicated by Cumulus Media and is heard in over 78 markets nationwide with over 8 million loyal listeners daily. Since his radio show debuted nationally in 2005, Mr. Baisden has captured the hearts and minds of millions of Americans with his provocative mix of relationship talk, hot topics, politics and the best of old school with today’s R&B. His high energy and love for interacting with his listeners is just one reason for the popularity and success of The Michael Baisden Show.

According to Simon & Schuster, Michael Baisden is “probably the most successful self-published African American male author out there today.” With nearly 2 million books in print both hard and soft cover, his books blend the perfect combination of entertainment, humor, provocation and sexuality. Michael’s vibrant personality on and off the air has made him a people magnet.

He began attracting attention with primarily female followers as author and publisher of the highly successful best selling books: “Never Satisfied: How and Why Men Cheat”, “Men Cry in the Dark”, “The Maintenance Man”, “God’s Gift to Women” and most recently a hot new book “Never Satisfied: Do Men Know What They Want.” Baisden is currently writing his 6th book to be released in 2012. Two of his titles ultimately were adapted into stage plays playing to sold out crowds across the US.

New York Times best-selling author, Zane, is undeniably the largest selling author of her genre in the world. Her books on sex and erotica have sold in the millions. Her company Strebor Books is dedicated to publishing a wide diversity of both fiction and non-fiction books. Strebor Books is committed to finding and developing the careers of cutting-edge authors who take risks with their stories.

A personal vision of Zane’s, Strebor Books International examines every aspect and characteristic of the human spirit. From contemporary romance to science fiction, from mystery to erotica, from paranormal to historical, from political to religious, no genre is overlooked amongst the continuously expanding catalog of titles.

Zane has the power of discernment when it comes to ascertaining “the next big thing” as proven with her own success; going from a grassroots publisher to running an imprint of Simon and Schuster in less than five years.

Zane is the creator, scriptwriter and executive producer of “Zane’s Sex Chronicles,” the highly rated Cinemax series based loosely on her real life, and the upcoming “Zane’s The Jump Off,” premiering on Cinemax Spring 2013. She is currently writing two feature film screenplays, a broadway musical, and her novel “Addicted” is scheduled to be filmed this summer by Lionsgate.

She is a huge advocate against domestic violence. Her book “Breaking the Cycle,” dealing with the effects of domestic violence on children, was the 2006 NAACP Image Award winner for Outstanding Literature. She was featured in the HBO documentary “The Black List,” which examined the lives of African-American overachievers like Toni Morrison, Colin Powell, Russell Simmons, Sean “Puffy” Combs, and Chris Rock.

Swiss Public Television has also produced a documentary on Zane entitled “Zane: Queen of Erotica,” that was translated into several languages and broadcast throughout the world.

Amber Comminications Group Inc’s African American Pavilion at BEA is no stranger to influential men and women alike, particularly those in the literary world. Since ACGI’s Publisher/CEO Tony Rose founded the African American Pavilion at BEA in 2004, the event has featured special guest appearances by Magic Johnson, Haki Madhubuti, Wesley Snipes, Tavis Smiley, Zane, Tom Joyner, Kassahun Checole, W. Paul Coates, Dr. Cornell West, George Fraser, Omarosa, Sybil Wilkes, Flava Flav, Coach Tony Dungee, Prodigy of Mobb Deep, Terrie Williams, Dr. Steve Perry (CNN & Random House), Max Rodriguez (The Harlem Book Fair) and Annette Thomas (NAACP Image Awards Literary Coordinator), to name a few.

Along with Michael Baisden and Zane, the 2012 invited guests will include: Book Industry Leaders – Carol Mackey (Black Expressions Book Club), Troy Johnson (AALBC), Ron Kavanaugh (Mosaic Books), Malaika Adero (Atria Books/Simon and Schuster), Dawn Davis (Armistad Press / Harper Collins), Judith Curr (Atria Books/Simon and Schuster), Cheryl Woodruf (Smiley Books), LaToya Smith (Grand Central Publishing), Dante Lee (Diversity City Media), Dr. Farrah Grey (Philanthropist), Wade and Cheryl Hudson (Just Us Books), Clara Villarosa, Lesleigh Underwood (Kensington Press), Vanesse Lloyd-Sgambati (Publicist) and Selena James (Kensington Press). Authors will include: Mary B. Morrison, Omar Tyree, Mary Monroe, Victoria Christopher Murray, Irene Smalls, Kevin Weeks, Kevin Johnson, Lynette Velasco, Renee Flagler, James Tanner, Darryl King, Artie Fletcher, Denroy Morgan, Levar Fisher, Dorothy Hughes and many others.

BookExpo America, one of the largest book trade exhibits in the world, provides independent African American book publishers, self publishers, authors, Black Interest Imprints at major publishing houses, distributors, literary agents, publicists, librarians and bookstore owners exposure to 20,561 book buyers and booksellers from across the globe. The event takes place at the Jacob Javits Convention Center, New York City June 5th – 7th 2012.

Now in its ninth year, Amber Communication Group, Inc.’s African American Pavilion Booth at BEA, exhibit space, will showcase African American books, authors, products and publishers. There will be great opportunities to learn, share, educate, sell and network.

There is an open invitation to join book industry professionals and authors for the “6th Annual Black Pack Party”, Wednesday June 6th, 6-9pm at Londel’s Supper Club, 2620 Frederick Douglas Blvd (at 140th St) Harlem, NYC.

April 2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the upcoming bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. A Wish and a Prayer: A Blessings Novel by Beverly Jenkins
    (William Morrow Paperbacks, 2012-04-10, Kindle Edition)
    Anyone worried that living in a small town could be boring certainly hasn’t lived in Henry Adams, Kansas. From the wealthy divorcÉe who saved this historic town founded by freed slaves to the romantic entanglements that have set tongues wagging and hearts fluttering (and everything in between), there’s plenty to keep the lovably eccentric townsfolk busy.Preston Miles is happy living with his foster parents, but an e-mail from his maternal grandmother is about to change all that. . . . Riley Curry, the former town mayor, is convinced his pet hog, Cletus, acted in self-defense when he sat on—and killed—a man. Now Riley just has to prove it in a court of law. . . . And as for Rocky, she has already had a lifetime of hurt. Will she risk opening her heart—and her life—to Jack? Warm, funny, poignant, and unforgettable, Beverly Jenkins’s latest excursion to Henry Adams is a true delight—a welcome return to a place that always feels like home.

     

  2. Sultry Nights (Kimani Romance) by Donna Hill
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    Her RulesDominique Lawson lives life on her terms, making up the rules along the way. This beautiful Lawson twin and heiress to a glittering Louisiana dynasty goes after what she wants—and usually gets it. But Trevor Jackson seems immune to her charms. That’s until Dominique plots her all-out sensual assault on the blatantly sexy contractor, who’s as cool as they come. Now passion is heating up the Southern sky.…His PassionDominique may be his boss, but Trevor plans to show the pampered princess what desire is really about. Never mind that they clash on just about everything—it’s only a matter of time before the blue-blooded beauty is his. Can he convince Dominique that they belong together, now and for all the sensual nights to come?

     

  3. RedBone by T. Styles
    (Urban Books, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    Where, oh where, have Farah’s roommates all gone?When Farah Cotton places a classified ad stating, “Cute redbone female looking to share a luxury apartment with another redbone female,” many women apply. One look at the lush apartment in Washington, D.C., and every fly girl around wants a chance to call Platinum Lofts her new home. The moment Farah lays eyes on Lesa Carmine, a pretty young woman with an active lifestyle and a sunny disposition, she knows she’s found the perfect girl for her ultimate plan. The two become fast friends—until Farah becomes intrusive and then her siblings move in, violating Lesa’s privacy. Farah seems dangerous when she’s around them, and Lesa attempts to sever ties without paying rent. Feeling overcome with blinding rage, Farah finds all kinds of ways to seek revenge. From poisoning to spreading vicious lies, she makes it known that she doesn’t take Lesa’s brush-off lightly. When Lesa snoops around in Farah’s past and discovers who she really is, she makes a grave mistake, one that could jeopardize her life. Brace yourselves, because just when you think you have it figured out, you’ll realize you don’t.

     

  4. Payback Ain’t Enough by Wahida Clark
    (Cash Money Content, 2012-04-24, Kindle Edition)
    Picking up where the suspenseful ending of Payback With Ya Life left off, we’re plunged back into the hip hop drama, where the men are hot and dangerous, the women know their shoes from their Choos, and will stop at nothing to get what they want. In a game of power and intrigue where the stakes are high and the rewards are dazzling, the losers are gonna discover – there’s always a price to pay.

     

  5. Pleasure Rush (Kimani Romance) by Farrah Rochon
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    In Hawaii for her birthday, Manhattan restaurateur Deirdre Smallwood has one mission to accomplish. She’s going to shed her humdrum image and do something totally out of character: seduce Thelonius Stokes, the gorgeous ex-linebacker for the New York Sabers.Theo is shocked by the sensual, uninhibited lover warming his bed. The pro-footballer-turned-TV-sports-analyst had Deirdre pegged for a girl-next-door type of woman. But she’s making his blood run hot and giving him a rush of pleasure he’s never felt before. This time around, Theo vows to score a touchdown on the only playing field that counts: the arena of love.

     

  6. Diamond Dreams (Kimani Romance) by Zuri Day
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    As the only daughter of Southern California’s most famous wine dynasty, Diamond Drake devotes all her waking hours to the family business. Burned by love, she’s not sure she ever wants to fall in love again. But construction millionaire Jackson Wright is sweeping her up in a whirlwind romance. Is he the real thing? Or will the sinfully sexy bachelor prove to be all flash and no substance?From the moment he sees her, Jackson is dazzled by the stunning, sultry Diamond. He knows it’s dangerous to mix business with pleasure. If only Diamond will say yes to a future glittering with their passion and love.…

     

  7. Taking Care of Business by Lutishia Lovely
    (Dafina, 2012-04-01, Paperback)
    Lutishia Lovely cooks up a riveting portrait of a trailblazing family expanding their booming soul food dynasty. . .After a long bout of misfortune, betrayal, and broken hearts, the Livingstons and their soul food empire are thriving. Toussaint Livingston is the Food Network darling, Malcolm Livingston’s BBQ Soul Smoker is still the toast of QVC, and Bianca Livingston’s brainchild TOSTS–Taste Of Soul Tapas Style–is a sizzling sensation on L.A.’s Sunset Strip. It seems that nothing can stop the progress of this third generation–until a dish called trouble gets added to the menu. Jefferson Livingston is the only sibling who feels he hasn’t made his mark, a fact for which he partly blames Toussaint. But with a recent promotion and a sexy new assistant, Jefferson is ready to show his cousin just how big a mistake he made. Then a fire breaks out, an old enemy rears his ugly head, and a stranger threatens the family’s legacy. Jefferson and Toussaint must now work together to keep the dynasty from falling apart. Can they put their differences aside long enough to take care of business? There’s only one way to find out. . . .”A great new taste in the literary world.” –Carl Weber

     

  8. To Love You More (Kimani Romance) by Wayne Jordan
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    George Simpson has never had a problem wooing women. The sexy-as-sin attorney is as commanding in the courtroom as he is in his candlelit bedroom. He’s always told the truth and nothing but the truth about his personal life: flings with no strings attached. That way, no one gets hurt. Least of all him. Because George has been there, done that—and has vowed to never fall in love again.Rachel Davis can’t believe the playboy her first love, George, has become. When he broke her heart years ago, the accomplished lawyer wanted nothing more than to run away from Barbados—and from George. She knows there’s no place like home—and seeing George again sends her heart into overdrive. But Rachel has a secret that may destroy their passionate reunion. Will her confessions of the past lead to a trial by fire…or a verdict of intimate seduction?

     

  9. Detroit: A Biography by Scott Martelle
    (Chicago Review Press, 2012-04-01, Hardcover)
    Detroit was established as a French settlement three-quarters of a century before the founding of this nation. A remote outpost built to protect trapping interests, it grew as agriculture expanded on the new frontier. Its industry took a great leap forward with the completion of the Erie Canal, which opened up the Great Lakes to the East Coast. Surrounded by untapped natural resources, Detroit turned iron from the Mesabi Range into stoves and railcars, and eventually cars by the millions. This vibrant commercial hub attracted businessmen and labor organizers, European immigrants and African Americans from the rural South. At its mid-20th-century heyday, one in six American jobs were connected to the auto industry, its epicenter in Detroit. And then the bottom fell out.            Detroit: A Biography takes a long, unflinching look at the evolution of one of America’s great cities, and one of the nation’s greatest urban failures. It tells how the city grew to become the heart of American industry and how its utter collapse—from 1.8 million residents in 1950 to 714,000 only six decades later—resulted from a confluence of public policies, private industry decisions, and deep, thick seams of racism. And it raises the question: when we look at modern-day Detroit, are we looking at the ghost of America’s industrial past or its future?

     

  10. White Lines II: Sunny: A Novel by Tracy Brown
    (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2012-04-24, Paperback)
    In her most stunning, riveting, unstoppable novel yet, bestselling and critically acclaimed author, Tracy Brown delivers the not-to-be-missed sequel to WHITE LINES On the surface, it appears that Sunny has got it all–looks, money, a beautiful home, a healthy daughter, and friends who love her. But Sunny has a secret—something she hasn’t even told her best friend. The truth is Sunny is unhappy. She still misses her beloved Dorian, and worries that no other man will evercaptivate her the way he did. She dated some very powerful and successful men since Dorian’s death. But will she ever find love again?It’s not long before Sunny is chasing those white lines again. And, when the truth finally explodes, willSunny abe able to put her life back together again?

     

  11. No Citizen Left Behind by Meira Levinson
    (Harvard University Press, 2012-04-23, Hardcover)
    While teaching at an all-Black middle school in Atlanta, Levinson realized that her students’ individual self-improvement would not necessarily enable them to overcome their historical marginalization. In order to overcome their civic empowerment gap, students must learn how to reshape power relationships through public political and civic action.

     

  12. Sweet Giselle by Karen Williams
    (Urban Books, 2012-04-01, Paperback)
    Giselle thinks she has the perfect life. Her fine and sexy husband, Giovanni, is obsessed with his perfect wife and gives her whatever her heart desires. Giselle thinks her husband can do no wrong. What she doesn’t know is that his lucrative adult film company is not as legit as it seems, and Giovanni’s seedy dealings put his precious wife in danger. Giselle is kidnapped by a vicious drug dealer named Bryce, who is hell bent on revenge after his sister comes up missing and he believes Giovanni is responsible. Bryce takes the thing he knows Giovanni treasures most. He plans to torture Giselle, but instead he finds himself falling in love with her. He reveals the truth about Giovanni and the news pushes her right into Bryce’s arms.  Giovanni wages a war against Bryce and anyone close to him, leaving several dead bodies in his wake. Now that he has his wife back, Giovanni thinks things can return to the way they were. Giselle, however, can’t get Bryce out of her system, and continues to see him behind Giovanni’s back. As the war between these two men heats up again, Giselle has to decide if being with the man she loves is worth risking her life.

     

  13. World Right Side Up: Investing Across Six Continents (Agora Series) by Christopher W. Mayer
    (Wiley, 2012-04-10, Hardcover)
    Invaluable insights into finding diverse investment opportunities in the emergent global economyFrom Brazilian farmlands to Colombian gold fields, from Chinese shopping malls to Indian hotels, from South African wine country to the boom/bust souks of Dubai, this around-the-world investing field trip explores the nooks and crannies for hidden investment opportunities. World Right Side Up: Investing Across Six Continents is packed with ideas to power your portfolio in the years ahead while teaching you a little fascinating history along the way. Fact is, the world’s markets have changed in a big way. For the first time since before the Industrial Revolution, the emerging markets now contribute as much to the global economy as their more well-developed peers. Far from being an anomaly, this state of affairs is more in line with the bulk of human experience. For centuries, China and India were the world’s largest economies. And so the world is turning…right side up.This change creates a wealth of opportunities for investors, in both the emerging markets and developed markets. World Right Side Up is your guide on how to take full advantage of this shift.Provides an entertaining view of various regions visited by the author, including South America, Asia, Africa, North America, and the Middle EastExplores specific investment ideas and themes, including opportunities in agriculture, water, energy, infrastructure and much moreIncludes five key takeaways from each region, an invaluable feature, offering resources to consult for more information and guidanceWhile some people fear the changes happening now, the reality is that for the forward-thinking investor, these sizable new markets will create extraordinary new opportunities.

     

  14. Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick by Paul Dickson
    (Walker & Company, 2012-04-24, Hardcover)
     Relying on primary sources, including more than a hundred interviews, Paul Dickson has crafted a richly detailed portrait of an American original: baseball impresario and innovator, independent spirit and unflinching advocate of racial equality, Bill Veeck. Veeck (1914–1986) was born into baseball. His sportswriter father became president of the Chicago Cubs, and Bill later worked for owner Phil Wrigley, rebuilding Wrigley Field to achieve the famed ambience that exists today. In his late twenties, he bought into his first team, the American Association Milwaukee Brewers. As World War II intensified, Veeck volunteered for combat duty, enduring a leg injury that led to a lifetime of amputations and silent suffering. On returning, he bought the Cleveland Indians in 1946—the first of four midwestern teams he would own, preceding the hapless St. Louis Browns (1951–53) and the Chicago White Sox (twice, 1959–61 and 1975–81). Though foiled in an earlier plan to bring Negro League players to the majors, in the summer of 1947, Veeck integrated his team on field and off, signing Larry Doby, the American League’s first black player, and hiring the first black public relations officer, trainer, and scout. A year later, he signed the legendary black pitcher Satchel Paige, who helped win the 1948 World Series—Cleveland’s last championship to this day. His promotional genius was second to none, endearing him to fans in every city, while his feel for the game led him to propose innovations way ahead of their time. Veeck’s deep sense of fairness helped usher in free agency, breaking the stranglehold owners had on players; indeed, he was the only owner to testify in support of Curt Flood during his landmark reserve clause challenge. Bill Veeck brings fully to life a transformational, visionary figure who spent a lifetime challenging baseball’s and society’s well-entrenched status quo. It is essential reading for any fan and anyone with a fascination for twentieth-century America.

     

  15. Alibi II: Nard’s Revenge by Teri Woods
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2012-04-24, Paperback)
    ALIBI II picks up where ALIBI left off. The year is 2006 and Diane Praeliou is happily married and living on a horse ranch in Arizona when she receives a letter that threatens her entire world. Someone knows her true identity.In 1986, Daisy was given a second chance at life when she received a new identity and a fresh start as a college student in Arizona courtesy of the witness protection program. Nard wasn’t so lucky. He was sentenced to twenty years to life in a western Pennsylvania facility and has endured things that no man should ever have to endure. All Nard can think about is Daisy’s testimony and how much he wants revenge. Diane goes on living life, finding love, and getting married until things slowly begin to spiral out of control. What makes matters worse is now Nard is out on parole and Diane is afraid for herself and her family. Feigning innocence, Diane can only turn to one person for help. But if she doesn’t come clean about her past secrets, her entire world can come crashing down and there will be no one to protect her.

     

  16. Ran Away (Benjamin January Mysteries) by Barbara Hambly
    (Severn House Digital, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    A Benjamin January mystery – RAN AWAY. So began a score of advertisements every week in the New Orleans newspapers, advertising for slaves who’d fled their masters. But the Turk, Huseyin Pasha, posted no such advertisement when his two lovely concubines disappeared. And when a witness proclaimed he’d seen the ‘devilish infidel’ hurl their dead bodies out of a window, everyone was willing to believe him the murderer. Only Benjamin January, who knows the Turk of old, is willing to seek for the true culprit, endangering his own life in the process . . .

     

  17. Scandals by Sasha Campbell
    (Dafina, 2012-04-01, Paperback)
    Learning to trust can be the hardest lesson of all. . .Newly divorced single mom Monica Houston needs to find a job. When her best friend suggests she answer an ad seeking exotic dancers, they both laugh. But with no work in sight, it’s no joke. Soon, Monica is dancing at Scandalous, and the money is flowing. But to hold on to her children, and her heart, she’ll have to keep it a secret from both her ex and her new man. Too bad someone in her life has other ideas. The baddest dancer at Scandalous, Robin Wright a.k.a. Treasure lives for herself and trusts no one. The last thing she wants is to take in her estranged sister Deandra’s little boy, Kyle. But with Deandra arrested for murder, she has no choice. There’s just one condition: Kyle’s hot “big brother” Lance has to babysit. With a man and a child in her life, Treasure’s heart opens. Soon she’s in love–and determined to prove Deandra’s innocence–though it means the greatest risk of all. “These characters leap off the page and make you want to join in.” –Lutishia Lovely on Confessions”Drama, drama and more drama!. . .It’s a good juicy read you won’t want to put down.” –Romantic Times on Confessions “This novel will heat your seat!” –Brenda Hampton, author of the Naughty series, on Suspicions”Keep your eyes on Sasha Campbell!” –Brenda Hampton, author of the Naughty series

     

  18. The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation: African Americans and the Fight for Freedom (Civil War America) by Glenn David Brasher
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2012-04-02, Hardcover)
    In the Peninsula Campaign of spring 1862, Union general George B. McClellan failed in his plan to capture the Confederate capital and bring a quick end to the conflict. But the campaign saw something new in the war–the participation of African Americans in ways that were critical to the Union offensive. Ultimately, that participation influenced Lincoln’s decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation at the end of that year. Glenn David Brasher’s unique narrative history delves into African American involvement in this pivotal military event, demonstrating that blacks contributed essential manpower and provided intelligence that shaped the campaign’s military tactics and strategy and that their activities helped to convince many Northerners that emancipation was a military necessity.Drawing on the voices of Northern soldiers, civilians, politicians, and abolitionists as well as Southern soldiers, slaveholders, and the enslaved, Brasher focuses on the slaves themselves, whose actions showed that they understood from the outset that the war was about their freedom. As Brasher convincingly shows, the Peninsula Campaign was more important in affecting the decision for emancipation than the Battle of Antietam.

     

  19. Abraham Lincoln and White America by Brian R. Dirck
    (Univ Pr of Kansas, 2012-04-19, Hardcover)
    As “Savior of the Union” and the “Great Emancipator,” Abraham Lincoln has been lauded for his courage, wisdom, and moral fiber. Yet Frederick Douglass’s assertion that Lincoln was the “white man’s president” has been used by some detractors as proof of his fundamentally racist character. Viewed objectively, Lincoln was a white man’s president by virtue of his own whiteness and that of the culture that produced him. Until now, however, historians have rarely explored just what this means for our understanding of the man and his actions. Writing at the vanguard of “whiteness studies,” Brian Dirck considers Lincoln as a typical American white man of his time who bore the multiple assumptions, prejudices, and limitations of his own racial identity. He shows us a Lincoln less willing or able to transcend those limitations than his more heroic persona might suggest but also contends that Lincoln’s understanding and approach to racial bigotry was more enlightened than those of most of his white contemporaries.Blazing a new trail in Lincoln studies, Dirck reveals that Lincoln was well aware of and sympathetic to white fears, especially that of descending into “white trash,” a notion that gnawed at a man eager to distance himself from his own coarse origins. But he also shows that after Lincoln crossed the Rubicon of black emancipation, he continued to grow beyond such cultural constraints, as seen in his seven recorded encounters with nonwhites. Dirck probes more deeply into what “white” meant in Lincoln’s time and what it meant to Lincoln himself, and from this perspective he proposes a new understanding of how Lincoln viewed whiteness as a distinct racial category that influenced his policies. As Dirck ably demonstrates, Lincoln rose far enough above the confines of his culture to accomplish deeds still worthy of our admiration, and he calls for a more critically informed admiration of Lincoln that allows us to celebrate his considerable accomplishments while simultaneously recognizing his limitations.When Douglass observed that Lincoln was the white man’s president, he may not have intended it as a serious analytical category. But, as Dirck shows, perhaps we should do so—the better to understand not just the Lincoln presidency, but the man himself.

     

Barnes&Noble.com

2012 AAMBC Literary Awards Nominees

Winners will be announced live at the Baltimore Urban Book Festival on May 6th — www.baltimoreurbanbookfestival.com

Voting link is here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEp4M25ZN2xRQks1ZlJuajJUNTM4M3c6MQ.

AAMBC Author of the Year

WINKK

Gregg Burton

Monique D. Mensah

Cheryl Faye

Christian Cashelle

Tiffany Ashley

Indie Book Store of the Year

The Literary Joint

Urban Knowledge

Horizon Books

Deja vu Book Lounge

Cartel Books

Breakout Author of the Year

David Weaver

ChaBella Don

Ondrea Davis

Chris Renee

Kai Storm

Magazine of the Year

Juicy

VIBE

Essence

Black Literature Magazine

Urbania

Book Club of the Year

OOSA

Divas Divine

AALBC

Sistahs on the Reading Edge

ARC

Indie Publisher of the Year

Life Changing Books

Wahida Clack Presents

Cartel Publications

G Street Chronicles

Street Lit Writer of the Year

Ashley Antoinette

K’Wan

JaQuavis Coleman

Erick S. Gray

Treasure E. Blue

Reviewer of the Year

Rawsistaz

Joey Pinkney

Cheryl Francis

ARC

Urban Reviews

Poet of the Year

Julia Press Simmons

Archuleta Chisolm

GPA

Imani Wisdom

Male Author of the Year

Eyone Williams

June Miller

RM Johnson

JaQuavis Coleman

Booker T. Mattison

Romance Author of the Year

Donna Hill

Francis Ray

Lutishia Lovely

Cheris Hodges

Brenda Joyce


Female Author of the Year

T. Styles

Traci Brown

Traci Bee

Envy Red

Wahida Clark


Christian Fiction Author of the Year

Victoria Christopher Murray

Vanessa Miller

Kimberla Lawson Roby

Vanessa Davis Griggs

Readers Choice Award

Jessica Miller-Epps

Joyce Oscar

Shewanda Pugh

Shampriest Bevel

DH Brooks

Event: The State Of Black Sci Fi 2012

Time: February 16, 2012 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Location: Clough Commons Auditorium, Georgia Tech
Organized By: Geogia Tech Science Fiction Department

Event Description:
Come join us as we discuss the state of Black Science Fiction, share our stories and perform a group reading created especially for this event. Participating in this first of its kind event are Ed Hall, L.M. Davis, Milton Davis, Alan Jones, Alicia McCalla, Wendy Raven McNair and Balogun Ojetade.

The Black Science Fiction Society