Tag Archives: bestsellers

The Root’s Summer Reading List

The Root’s book selections for the Summer of 2014, featuring “Book of Hours” by Kevin Young, “Eslanda: The Large and Unconventional Life of Mrs. Paul Robeson” by Barbara Ransby, “Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II” by Farah Jasmine Griffin:

Book of Hours: Poems by Kevin Young

A decade after the sudden and tragic loss of his father, we witness the unfolding of grief. “In the night I brush / my teeth with a razor,” he tells us, in one of the collection’s piercing two-line poems. Capturing the strange silence of bereavement (“Not the storm / but the calm / that slays me”), Kevin Young acknowledges, even celebrates, life’s passages, his loss transformed and tempered in a sequence about the birth of his son: in “Crowning,” he delivers what is surely one of the most powerful birth poems written by a man, describing “her face / full of fire, then groaning your face / out like a flower, blood-bloom,/ crocused into air.” Ending this book of both birth and grief, the gorgeous title sequence brings acceptance, asking “What good/are wishes if they aren’t / used up?” while understanding “How to listen / to what’s gone.” Young’s frank music speaks directly to the reader in these elemental poems, reminding us that the right words can both comfort us and enlarge our understanding of life’s mysteries.

Eslanda: The Large and Unconventional Life of Mrs. Paul Robeson by Barbara Ransby

Eslanda “Essie” Cardozo Goode Robeson lived a colorful and amazing life. Her career and commitments took her many places: colonial Africa in 1936, the front lines of the Spanish Civil War, the founding meeting of the United Nations, Nazi-occupied Berlin, Stalin’s Russia, and China two months after Mao’s revolution. She was a woman of unusual accomplishment — an anthropologist, a prolific journalist, a tireless advocate of women’s rights, an outspoken anti-colonial and antiracist activist, and an internationally sought-after speaker. Yet historians for the most part have confined Essie to the role of Mrs. Paul Robeson, a wife hidden in the large shadow cast by her famous husband. In this masterful book, biographer Barbara Ransby refocuses attention on Essie, one of the most important and fascinating black women of the twentieth century.

Chronicling Essie’s eventful life, the book explores her influence on her husband’s early career and how she later achieved her own unique political voice. Essie’s friendships with a host of literary icons and world leaders, her renown as a fierce defender of justice, her defiant testimony before Senator Joseph McCarthy’s infamous anti-communist committee, and her unconventional open marriage that endured for over 40 years—all are brought to light in the pages of this inspiring biography. Essie’s indomitable personality shines through, as do her contributions to United States and twentieth-century world history.

Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II
by Farah Jasmine Griffin

As World War II raged overseas, Harlem witnessed a battle of its own. Brimming with creative and political energy, the neighborhood’s diverse array of artists and activists took advantage of a brief period of progressivism during the war years to launch a bold cultural offensive aimed at winning democracy for all Americans, regardless of race or gender. Ardent believers in America’s promise, these men and women helped to lay the groundwork for the Civil Rights Movement before Cold War politics and anti-Communist fervor temporarily froze their dreams at the dawn of the postwar era.

In Harlem Nocturne, esteemed scholar Farah Jasmine Griffin tells the stories of three black female artists whose creative and political efforts fueled this historic movement for change: choreographer and dancer Pearl Primus, composer and pianist Mary Lou Williams, and novelist Ann Petry. Like many African Americans in the city at the time, these women weren’t native New Yorkers, but the metropolis and its vibrant cultural scene gave them the space to flourish and the freedom to express their political concerns. Pearl Primus performed nightly at the legendary Cafe Society, the first racially integrated club in New York, where she debuted dances of social protest that drew on long-buried African traditions and the dances of former slaves in the South. Williams, meanwhile, was a major figure in the emergence of bebop, collaborating with Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, and Bud Powell and premiering her groundbreaking Zodiac Suite at the legendary performance space Town Hall. And Ann Petry conveyed the struggles of working-class black women to a national audience with her acclaimed novel The Street, which sold over a million copies — a first for a female African American author.

A rich biography of three artists and the city that inspired them, Harlem Nocturne captures a period of unprecedented vitality and progress for African Americans and women, revealing a cultural movement and a historical moment whose influence endures today.


The Cutting Season: A Novel by Attica Locke

Attica Locke‘s breathtaking debut novel, Black Water Rising, won resounding acclaim from major publications coast-to-coast and from respected crime fiction masters like James Ellroy and George Pelecanos, earning this exciting new author comparisons to Dennis Lehane, Scott Turow, and Walter Mosley. Locke returns with The Cutting Season, a second novel easily as gripping and powerful as her first — a heart-pounding thriller that interweaves two murder mysteries, one on Belle Vie, a historic landmark in the middle of Lousiana’s Sugar Cane country, and one involving a slave gone missing more than one hundred years earlier. Black Water Rising was nominated for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize, an Edgar Award, and an NAACP Image Award, and was short-listed for the Orange Prize in the U.K. The Cutting Season has been selected by bestselling author Dennis Lehane as the first pick for his new line of books at HarperCollins.

Men We Reaped: A Memoir by Jesmyn Ward

“We saw the lightning and that was the guns; and then we heard the thunder and that was the big guns; and then we heard the rain falling and that was the blood falling; and when we came to get in the crops, it was dead men that we reaped.” — Harriet Tubman

In five years, Jesmyn Ward lost five young men in her life — to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that can follow people who live in poverty, particularly black men. Dealing with these losses, one after another, made Jesmyn ask the question: Why? And as she began to write about the experience of living through all the dying, she realized the truth — and it took her breath away. Her brother and her friends all died because of who they were and where they were from, because they lived with a history of racism and economic struggle that fostered drug addiction and the dissolution of family and relationships. Jesmyn says the answer was so obvious she felt stupid for not seeing it. But it nagged at her until she knew she had to write about her community, to write their stories and her own.

Jesmyn grew up in poverty in rural Mississippi. She writes powerfully about the pressures this brings, on the men who can do no right and the women who stand in for family in a society where the men are often absent. She bravely tells her story, revisiting the agonizing losses of her only brother and her friends. As the sole member of her family to leave home and pursue higher education, she writes about this parallel American universe with the objectivity distance provides and the intimacy of utter familiarity. A brutal world rendered beautifully, Jesmyn Ward’s memoir will sit comfortably alongside Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, Tobias Wolff’s This Boy’s Life, and Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

Essence Magazine, June-2014

Essence Magazine’s Book Features for June 2014

Essence Magazine’s book selections for June 2014, featuring their “Summer Reading Challenge” (Wendy Williams’ “Hold Me in Contempt,” Walter Mosley’s “Debbie Doesn’t Do It Anymore,” Morowa Yejide’s “Time of the Locust,” Cynthia Bond’s “Ruby,” Lauren Francis-Sharma’s’s “‘Til the Well Runs Dry,” and Elizabeth Nunez’ “Not for Everyday Use”), Toni Braxton’s memoir “Unbreak My Heart,” and T.D. Jakes’ “Instinct”:

Hold Me in Contempt: A Romance by Wendy Williams

Move over 50 Shades, there’s a new romance in town. Superstar Wendy Williams brings on the heat in her first ever, no-holds-barred, down and dirty, romance novel.

Kimberly Kind is trying to get beyond her roots. A successful, beautiful, smart lawyer, she’s finally finding direction in her life and getting out of the streets. But a terrible accident threatens to throw her carefully laid plans off course. Now Kim’s hiding a huge secret — one that could threaten everything.

Enter King. A perfect mix of Justin Timberlake and David Beckham, the man oozes sex and has more swagger than anyone Kim’s ever met. Their chemistry is off the charts. But after passion-filled nights, the intensity of their emotions takes both of them by surprise.

Love was not supposed to be an option. Now it’s the only thing holding them together. When their pasts come back with a vengeance, can love possibly be enough?

Debbie Doesn’t Do It Anymore: A Novel by Walter Mosley

In this scorching, mournful, often explicit, and never less than moving literary novel by the famed creator of the Easy Rawlins series, Debbie Dare, a black porn queen, has to come to terms with her sordid life in the adult entertainment industry after her tomcatting husband dies in a hot tub. Electrocuted. With another woman in there with him. Debbie decides she just isn’t going to “do it anymore.” But executing her exit strategy from the porn world is a wrenching and far from simple process.

Millions of men (and no doubt many women) have watched famed black porn queen Debbie Dare — she of the blond wig and blue contacts — “do it” on television and computer screens every which way with every combination of partners the mind of man can imagine. But one day an unexpected and thunderous on-set orgasm catches Debbie unawares, and when she returns to the mansion she shares with her husband, insatiable former porn star and “film producer” Theon Pinkney, she discovers that he’s died in a case of hot tub electrocution, “auditioning” an aspiring “starlet.” Burdened with massive debts that her husband incurred, and which various L.A. heavies want to collect on, Debbie must reckon with a life spent in the peculiar subculture of the pornography industry and her estrangement from her family and the child she had to give up. She’s done with porn, but her options for what might come next include the possibility of suicide. Debbie . . . is a portrait of a ransacked but resilient soul in search of salvation and a cure for grief.

Time of the Locust: A Novel by Morowa Yejide

Travel into the heart and mind of an extraordinary autistic boy in this deeply imaginative debut novel of a mother’s devotion, a father’s punishment, and the power of love.

Sephiri is an autistic boy who lives in a world of his own making, where he dwells among imagined sea creatures that help him process information in the “real world” in which he is forced to live. But lately he has been having dreams of a mysterious place, and he starts creating fantastical sketches of this strange, inner world.

Brenda, Sephiri’s mother, struggles with raising her challenged child alone. Her only wish is to connect with him — a smile on his face would be a triumph. Meanwhile, Sephiri’s father, Horus, is sentenced to life in prison, making life even lonelier for Brenda and Sephiri. Yet prison is still not enough to separate father and son. In the seventh year of his imprisonment and the height of his isolation, Horus develops supernatural mental abilities that allow him to reach his son. Memory and yearning carry him outside his body, and through the realities of their ordeals and dreamscape, Horus and Sephiri find each other — and find hope in ways never imagined.

Deftly portrayed by the remarkable and talented up-and-comer Morowa Yejide, Time of the Locust is a brilliant narrative about the psychological realms of solitude, youth, and wonder. At its heart, this is a harrowing, surreal, and redemptive journey to the union of a family.

Ruby: A Novel by Cynthia Bond

The epic, unforgettable story of a man determined to protect the woman he loves from the town desperate to destroy her — this beautiful and devastating debut heralds the arrival of a major new voice in fiction.

Ephram Jennings has never forgotten the beautiful girl with the long braids running through the piney woods of Liberty, their small East Texas town. Young Ruby, “the kind of pretty it hurt to look at,” has suffered beyond imagining, so as soon as she can, she flees suffocating Liberty for the bright pull of 1950s New York. Ruby quickly winds her way into the ripe center of the city–the darkened piano bars and hidden alleyways of the Village–all the while hoping for a glimpse of the red hair and green eyes of her mother. When a telegram from her cousin forces her to return home, thirty-year-old Ruby Bell finds herself reliving the devastating violence of her girlhood. With the terrifying realization that she might not be strong enough to fight her way back out again, Ruby struggles to survive her memories of the town’s dark past. Meanwhile, Ephram must choose between loyalty to the sister who raised him and the chance for a life with the woman he has loved since he was a boy.

Full of life, exquisitely written, and suffused with the pastoral beauty of the rural South, Ruby is a transcendent novel of passion and courage. This wondrous page-turner rushes through the red dust and gossip of Main Street, to the pit fire where men swill bootleg outside Bloom’s Juke, to Celia Jennings’s kitchen where a cake is being made, yolk by yolk, that Ephram will use to try to begin again with Ruby. Utterly transfixing, with unforgettable characters, riveting suspense, and breathtaking, luminous prose, Ruby offers an unflinching portrait of man’s dark acts and the promise of the redemptive power of love.

‘Til the Well Runs Dry: A Novel by Lauren Francis-Sharma

A glorious and moving multi-generational, multicultural saga that begins in the 1940s and sweeps through the 1960′s in Trinidad and the United States.

Lauren Francis-Sharma‘s ‘Til the Well Runs Dry opens in a seaside village in the north of Trinidad where young Marcia Garcia, a gifted and smart-mouthed 16-year-old seamstress, lives alone, raising two small boys and guarding a family secret. When she meets Farouk Karam, an ambitious young policeman (so taken with Marcia that he elicits the help of a tea-brewing obeah woman to guarantee her ardor), the risks and rewards in Marcia’s life amplify forever.

On an island rich with laughter, Calypso, Carnival, cricket, beaches and salty air, sweet fruits and spicy stews, the novel follows Marcia and Farouk from their amusing and passionate courtship through personal and historical events that threaten Marcia’s secret, entangle the couple and their children in a scandal, and endanger the future for all of them.

‘Til the Well Runs Dry tells the twinned stories of a spirited woman’s love for one man and her bottomless devotion to her children. For readers who cherish the previously untold stories of women’s lives, here is a story of grit and imperfection and love that has not been told before.

Not for Everyday Use: A Memoir by Elizabeth Nunez

Tracing the four days from the moment she gets the call that every immigrant fears to the burial of her mother, Elizabeth Nunez tells the haunting story of her lifelong struggle to cope with the consequences of the “sterner stuff” of her parents’ ambitions for their children and her mother’s seemingly unbreakable conviction that displays of affection are not for everyday use.

But Nunez sympathizes with her parents, whose happiness is constrained by the oppressive strictures of colonialism, by the Catholic Church’s prohibition of artificial birth control which her mother obeys, terrified by the threat of eternal damnation (her mother gets pregnant fourteen times: nine live births and five miscarriages which almost kill her), and by what Malcolm Gladwell refers to as the “privilege of skin color” in his mother’s Caribbean island homeland where “the brown-skinned classes…came to fetishize their lightness.” Still, a fierce love holds this family together, and the passionate, though complex, love Nunez’s parents have for each other will remind readers of the passion between the aging lovers in Gabriel Garcia Marquez‘s Love in the Time of Cholera. Written in exquisite prose by a writer the New York Times Book Review calls “a master at pacing and plotting,” Not for Everyday Use is a page-turner that readers will find impossible to put down.

Unbreak My Heart: A Memoir by Toni Braxton

In this heartfelt memoir, six-time Grammy Award-winning artist and star of WE TV’s reality hit, Braxton Family Values, Toni Braxton writes about her personal life decisions and their impact on her health, family and career.

While Braxton appears to be living a gilded life — selling 60 million records, appearing in sold-out Las Vegas performances and hit shows like “Dancing with the Stars,” and starring in her own reality series — hers is in fact a tumultuous story, a tale of triumph over a life filled with obstacles, including two bankruptcy filings. The mother of an autistic child, Braxton long feared that her son’s condition might be karmic retribution for earlier life choices, some of which will shock fans. But when heart ailments began plaguing her at the age of 41 and she was diagnosed with Lupus, Braxton knew she had to move beyond the self-recrimination and take charge of her own healing.

Intensely honest and deeply inspirational, Unbreak My Heart is the never-before-told story of the measures Braxton took to make herself and her family whole again.

Instinct: The Power to Unleash Your Inborn Drive by T. D. Jakes

Modern life can seem like being lost in a jungle. With distractions and dangers emerging from every direction, it’s easy to lose focus. Over time, we lose touch with one of our most powerful, purposeful, God-given attributes–the desire to be fruitful and multiply, what Bishop T. D. Jakes calls our “instinct for increase.”

Combining historical, cultural, and personal examples with biblical insights, in INSTINCT, Bishop Jakes outlines how to re-discover your natural aptitudes and re-claim the wisdom of your past experiences. When attuned to divinely inspired instincts, you will become in sync with the opportunities life presents and discover a fresh abundance of resources. Knowing when to close a deal, when to take a risk, and when to listen to your heart will become possible when you’re in touch with the instincts that God gave you.

Bishop T.D. Jakes — iconic preacher, bestselling author, and entrepreneur–has inspired millions of people around the world. Here he writes from the peak of his personal power about how to experience the satisfaction of a life well lived. If you long to conquer the jungles of life, INSTINCT offers the personal and professional tools needed to navigate your course successfully and according to God’s design.

Ebony Magazine cover, March 2014

Ebony Magazine’s Book Choices for March 2014

Ebony Magazine’s March 2014 book selections:

Red Now and Laters: A Novel
Marcus J. Guillory

In this impressive debut Marcus J. Guillory brilliantly weaves together the many obstacles of a young man growing into adulthood, the realities of urban life, the history of Louisiana Creole culture, the glory of the black cowboy, and the role of religion in shaping lives.

South Park, Houston, Texas, 1977, is where we first meet Ti’ John, a young boy under the care of his larger-than life father — a working-class rodeo star and a practitioner of vodou—and his mother — a good Catholic and cautious disciplinarian — who forbids him to play with the neighborhood “hoodlums.” Ti’ John, throughout the era of Reaganomics and the dawn of hip-hop and cassette tapes, must negotiate the world around him and a peculiar gift he’s inherited from his father and Jules Saint-Pierre “Nonc” Sonnier, a deceased ancestor who visits the boy, announcing himself with the smell of smoke on a regular basis. In many ways, Ti’ John is an ordinary kid who loses his innocence as he witnesses violence and death, as he gets his heart broken by girls and his own embittered father, as he struggles to live up to his mother’s middle-class aspirations and his father’s notion of what it is to be a man. In other ways, he is different — from his childhood buddies and from the father who is his hero.

The question throughout this layered and complex coming-of-age story is will Ti’ John survive the bad side of life — and his upbringing — and learn how to recognize and keep what is good.

Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women: Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South
Blain Roberts

From the South’s pageant queens to the importance of beauty parlors to African American communities, it is easy to see the ways beauty is enmeshed in southern culture. But as Blain Roberts shows in this incisive work, the pursuit of beauty in the South was linked to the tumultuous racial divides of the region, where the Jim Crow-era cosmetics industry came of age selling the idea of makeup that emphasized whiteness, and where, in the 1950s and 1960s, black-owned beauty shops served as crucial sites of resistance for civil rights activists. In these times of strained relations in the South, beauty became a signifier of power and affluence while it reinforced racial strife.

Roberts examines a range of beauty products, practices, and rituals–cosmetics, hairdressing, clothing, and beauty contests–in settings that range from tobacco farms of the Great Depression to 1950s and 1960s college campuses. In so doing, she uncovers the role of female beauty in the economic and cultural modernization of the South. By showing how battles over beauty came to a head during the civil rights movement, Roberts sheds new light on the tactics southerners used to resist and achieve desegregation.

Saint Monkey: A Novel
Jacinda Townsend

A stunning debut novel of two girls raised in hardship, separated by fortune, and reunited through tragedy.

Fourteen-year-old Audrey Martin, with her Poindexter glasses and her head humming the 3/4 meter of gospel music, knows she’ll never get out of Kentucky — but when her fingers touch the piano keys, the whole church trembles. Her best friend, Caroline, daydreams about Hollywood stardom, but both girls feel destined to languish in a slow-moving stopover town in Montgomery County.

That is, until chance intervenes and a booking agent offers Audrey a ticket to join the booming jazz scene in Harlem — an offer she can’t resist, not even for Caroline. And in New York City the music never stops. Audrey flirts with love and takes the stage at the Apollo, with its fast-dancing crowds and blinding lights. But fortunes can turn fast in the city — young talent means tough competition, and for Audrey failure is always one step away. Meanwhile, Caroline sinks into the quiet anguish of a Black woman in a backwards country, where her ambitions and desires only slip further out of reach.

Jacinda Townsend’s remarkable first novel is a coming-of-age story made at once gripping and poignant by the wild energy of the Jazz Era and the stark realities of segregation. Marrying musical prose with lyric vernacular, Saint Monkey delivers a stirring portrait of American storytelling and marks the appearance of an auspicious new voice in literary fiction.

The Secret of Magic
Deborah Johnson

In 1946, a young female attorney from New York City attempts the impossible: attaining justice for a black man in the Deep South.

Regina Robichard works for Thurgood Marshall, who receives an unusual letter asking the NAACP to investigate the murder of a returning black war hero. It is signed by M. P. Calhoun, the most reclusive author in the country.

As a child, Regina was captivated by Calhoun’s The Secret of Magic, a novel in which white and black children played together in a magical forest.

Once down in Mississippi, Regina finds that nothing in the South is as it seems. She must navigate the muddy waters of racism, relationships, and her own tragic past.The Secret of Magic brilliantly explores the power of stories and those who tell them.

The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery
Sarah Lewis

It is one of the enduring enigmas of the human experience: many of our most iconic, creative endeavors — from Nobel Prize-winning discoveries to entrepreneurial inventions and works in the arts — are not achievements but conversions, corrections after failed attempts.

The gift of failure is a riddle. Like the number zero, it will always be both a void and the start of infinite possibility. The Rise — a soulful celebration of the determination and courage of the human spirit — makes the case that many of our greatest triumphs come from understanding the importance of this mystery.

This exquisite biography of an idea is about the improbable foundations of creative human endeavor. The Rise begins with narratives about figures past and present who range from writers to entrepreneurs; Frederick Douglass, Samuel F. B. Morse, and J. K. Rowling, for example, feature alongside choreographer Paul Taylor, Nobel Prize-winning physicists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, Arctic explorer Ben Saunders, and psychology professor Angela Duckworth.

The Rise explores the inestimable value of often ignored ideas — the power of surrender for fortitude, the criticality of play for innovation, the propulsion of the near win on the road to mastery, and the importance of grit and creative practice. From an uncommonly insightful writer, The Rise is a true masterwork.

Essence Magazine Cover, February 2014

Essence Magazine’s Black History Month Book Choices — February 2014

Essence Magazine’s February 2014 book selections for Black History Month:

Searching for Sarah Rector: The Richest Black Girl in America

Tonya Bolden

Sarah Rector was once famously hailed as “”the richest black girl in America.” Set against the backdrop of American history, her tale encompasses the creation of Indian Territory, the making of Oklahoma, and the establishment of black towns and oil-rich boomtowns. Rector acquired her fortune at the age of eleven. This is both her story and that of children just like her: one filled with ups and downs amid bizarre goings-on and crimes perpetrated by greedy and corrupt adults. From a trove of primary documents, including court and census records and interviews with family members, author Tonya Bolden painstakingly pieces together the events of Sarah’s life and the lives of those around her.

American Cocktail: A Colored Girl in the World
Anita Reynolds

This is the rollicking, never-before-published memoir of a fascinating woman with an uncanny knack for being in the right place in the most interesting times. Of racially mixed heritage, Anita Reynolds was proudly African American but often passed for Indian, Mexican, or Creole. Actress, dancer, model, literary critic, psychologist, but above all free-spirited provocateur, she was, as her Parisian friends nicknamed her, an American cocktail. One of the first black stars of the silent era, she appeared in Hollywood movies with Rudolph Valentino, attended Charlie Chaplin’s anarchist meetings, and studied dance with Ruth St. Denis. She moved to New York in the 1920s and made a splash with both Harlem Renaissance elites and Greenwich Village bohemians. An émigré in Paris, she fell in with the Left Bank avant garde, befriending Antonin Artaud, Man Ray, and Pablo Picasso. Next, she took up residence as a journalist in Barcelona during the Spanish Civil War and witnessed firsthand the growing menace of fascism. In 1940, as the Nazi panzers closed in on Paris, Reynolds spent the final days before the French capitulation as a Red Cross nurse, afterward making a mad dash for Lisbon to escape on the last ship departing Europe.

The Wars of Reconstruction: The Brief, Violent History of America’s Most Progressive Era
Douglas R. Egerton

By 1870, just five years after Confederate surrender and thirteen years after the Dred Scott decision ruled blacks ineligible for citizenship, Congressional action had ended slavery and given the vote to black men. That same year, Hiram Revels and Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first African-American U.S. senator and congressman respectively. In South Carolina, only twenty years after the death of arch-secessionist John C. Calhoun, a black man, Jasper J. Wright, took a seat on the state’s Supreme Court. Not even the most optimistic abolitionists had thought such milestones would occur in their lifetimes. The brief years of Reconstruction marked the United States’ most progressive moment prior to the civil rights movement. This history explores the state and local politics and tracing the struggles of some fifteen hundred African-American officeholders, in both the North and South, who fought entrenched white resistance.

Without Mercy: The Stunning True Story of Race, Crime, and Corruption in the Deep South
David Beasley

On December 9, 1938, the state of Georgia executed six black men in eighty-one  minutes in  Tattnall Prison’s electric chair. The executions were a record for the state that still stands today. The new prison, built with funds from FDR’s New Deal, as well as the fact that the men were tried and executed rather than lynched were thought to be a sign of progress. They were anything but. While those men were arrested, convicted, sentenced, and executed in as little as six weeks—E. D. Rivers, the governor of the state, oversaw a pardon racket for white killers and criminals, allowed the Ku Klux Klan to infiltrate his administration, and bankrupted the state. Race and wealth were all that determined whether or not a man lived or died. There was no progress. There was no justice. A harrowing true story of the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the violent death throes of the Klan, but most of all it is the story of the stunning injustice of these executions and how they have seared distrust of the legal system into the consciousness of the Deep South.

Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear
Aram Goudsouzian

In 1962, James Meredith became a civil rights hero when he enrolled as the first African American student at the University of Mississippi. Four years later, he would make the news again when he reentered Mississippi, on foot. His plan was to walk from Memphis to Jackson, leading a “March Against Fear” that would promote black voter registration and defy the entrenched racism of the region. But on the march’s second day, he was shot by a mysterious gunman, a moment captured in a harrowing and now iconic photograph.
What followed was one of the central dramas of the civil rights era. With Meredith in the hospital, the leading figures of the civil rights movement flew to Mississippi to carry on his effort. They quickly found themselves confronting southern law enforcement officials, local activists, and one another. In the span of only three weeks, Martin Luther King, Jr., narrowly escaped a vicious mob attack; protesters were teargassed by state police; Lyndon Johnson refused to intervene; and the charismatic young activist Stokely Carmichael first led the chant that would define a new kind of civil rights movement: Black Power. 
Aram Goudsouzian’s Down to the Crossroads is the story of the last great march of the King era, and the first great showdown of the turbulent years that followed. Depicting rural demonstrators’ courage and the impassioned debates among movement leaders, Goudsouzian reveals the legacy of an event that would both integrate African Americans into the political system and inspire even bolder protests against it. Full of drama and contemporary resonances, this book is civil rights history at its best.

Waking from the Dream: The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Shadow of Martin Luther King, Jr.
David L. Chappell

A sweeping history of the struggle to keep the civil rights movement alive and to realize King’s vision of an equal society.   In this arresting and groundbreaking account, David L. Chappell reveals that, far from coming to an abrupt end with King’s murder, the civil rights movement entered a new phase. It both grew and splintered. These were years when decisive, historic victories were no longer within reach—the movement’s achievements were instead hard-won, and their meanings unsettled. From the fight to pass the Fair Housing Act in 1968, to debates over unity and leadership at the National Black Political Conventions, to the campaign for full-employment legislation, to the surprising enactment of the Martin Luther King holiday, to Jesse Jackson’s quixotic presidential campaigns, veterans of the movement struggled to rally around common goals. Chappell chronicles the difficulties the movement encountered while working to build coalitions, pass legislation, and mobilize citizens in the absence of King’s galvanizing leadership. Could the civil rights coalition stay together as its focus shifted from public protests to congressional politics? Did the movement need a single, charismatic leader to succeed King, and who would that be? As the movement’s leaders pushed forward, they continually looked back, struggling to define King’s legacy and harness his symbolic power.

Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century
Monique W. Morris

A comprehensive guide filled with contemporary facts and figures on African Americans—is an essential reference for anyone attempting to fathom the complex state of our nation. With fascinating and often surprising information on everything from incarceration rates, lending practices, and the arts to marriage, voting habits, and green jobs, the contextualized material in this book will better attune readers to telling trends while challenging commonly held, yet often misguided, perceptions. A compilation that at once highlights measures of incredible progress and enumerates the disparate impacts of social policies and practices, this book is a critical tool for advocates, educators, and policy makers.

Spirit Rising: My Life, My Music
Angelique Kidjo

Grammy Award-winning singer Angélique Kidjo is known for her electrifying voice and fearless advocacy work. In this intimate memoir, she reveals how she escaped Communist Africa to make her dreams a reality, and how she’s prompting others all around the world to reach for theirs as well. Born in the West African nation of Benin, Angélique Kidjo grew up surrounded by the rich sounds, rhythms, and storytelling of traditional Beninese culture. When the Communists took over, they silenced her dynamic culture and demanded that she sing in praise of them. Angélique reveals the details of her dangerous escape into France, and how she rose from poverty to become a Grammy Award–winning artist and an international sensation at the top of Billboard’s World Albums chart. She also explains why it’s important to give back by sharing stories from her work as a UNICEF ambassador and as founder of the Batonga Foundation, which gives African girls access to education.
Desmond Tutu has contributed the foreword to this remarkable volume; Alicia Keys has provided an introduction. Her eloquent, inspiring narrative is paired with more than one hundred colorful photographs documenting Angélique’s life and experiences, as well as a sampling of recipes that has sustained her on her remarkable odyssey.

Essence Magazine Cover, February 2014

Essence Magazine’s Book Features for February 2014

Essence Magazine’s book selections for February 2014, featuring Southern novels “Queen Sugar” (Louisiana), “The Secret of Magic” (Mississippi), and “The Invention of Wings” (South Carolina):


Pamela Dorman Books, February 6, 2014, Hardcover

Viking Adult, 2/6/2014, Kindle Edition

Queen Sugar: A Novel by Natalie Baszile

A mother-daughter story of reinvention—about an African American woman who unexpectedly inherits a sugarcane farm in Louisiana

Why exactly Charley Bordelon’s late father left her eight hundred sprawling acres of sugarcane land in rural Louisiana is as mysterious as it was generous. Recognizing this as a chance to start over, Charley and her eleven-year-old daughter, Micah, say good-bye to Los Angeles.

They arrive just in time for growing season but no amount of planning can prepare Charley for a Louisiana that’s mired in the past: as her judgmental but big-hearted grandmother tells her, cane farming is always going to be a white man’s business. As the sweltering summer unfolds, Charley must balance the overwhelming challenges of her farm with the demands of a homesick daughter, a bitter and troubled brother, and the startling desires of her own heart.

Penguin has a rich tradition of publishing strong Southern debut fiction—from Sue Monk Kidd to Kathryn Stockett to Beth Hoffman. In Queen Sugar, we now have a debut from the African American point of view. Stirring in its storytelling of one woman against the odds and initimate in its exploration of the complexities of contemporary southern life, Queen Sugar is an unforgettable tale of endurance and hope.


Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam, January 21, 2014, Hardcover

Putnam Adult, 1/21/2014, Kindle Edition

The Secret of Magic by Deborah Johnson

In 1946, a young female attorney from New York City attempts the impossible: attaining justice for a black man in the Deep South.

Regina Robichard works for Thurgood Marshall, who receives an unusual letter asking the NAACP to investigate the murder of a returning black war hero. It is signed by M. P. Calhoun, the most reclusive author in the country. As a child, Regina was captivated by Calhoun’s The Secret of Magic, a novel in which white and black children played together in a magical forest.

Once down in Mississippi, Regina finds that nothing in the South is as it seems. She must navigate the muddy waters of racism, relationships, and her own tragic past. The Secret of Magic brilliantly explores the power of stories and those who tell them.


Viking Adult, January 7, 2014, Hardcover

Viking Adult, 1/7/2014, Kindle Edition

The Secret Life of Bees
The Tenth-Anniversary Edition
Penguin Books, November 23, 2011, Paperback

The Invention of Wings: With Notes by Sue Monk Kidd

From the celebrated author of “The Secret Life of Bees,” a magnificent novel about two unforgettable American women

Writing at the height of her narrative and imaginative gifts, Sue Monk Kidd presents a masterpiece of hope, daring, the quest for freedom, and the desire to have a voice in the world — and it is now the newest Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 selection.

Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke’s daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.

Kidd’s sweeping novel is set in motion on Sarah’s eleventh birthday, when she is given ownership of ten year old Handful, who is to be her handmaid. We follow their remarkable journeys over the next thirty five years, as both strive for a life of their own, dramatically shaping each other’s destinies and forming a complex relationship marked by guilt, defiance, estrangement and the uneasy ways of love.

As the stories build to a riveting climax, Handful will endure loss and sorrow, finding courage and a sense of self in the process. Sarah will experience crushed hopes, betrayal, unrequited love, and ostracism before leaving Charleston to find her place alongside her fearless younger sister, Angelina, as one of the early pioneers in the abolition and women’s rights movements.

Inspired by the historical figure of Sarah Grimke, Kidd goes beyond the record to flesh out the rich interior lives of all of her characters, both real and invented, including Handful’s cunning mother, Charlotte, who courts danger in her search for something better.

This exquisitely written novel is a triumph of storytelling that looks with unswerving eyes at a devastating wound in American history, through women whose struggles for liberation, empowerment, and expression will leave no reader unmoved.

Upcoming Bestsellers for February 2014

A list of the bestselling books to be released in February, just in time for Black History Month.

  1. Queen Sugar: A Novel by Natalie Baszile
    ( Pamela Dorman Books , 2/6/2014 , Hardcover )
    Why exactly Charley Bordelon’s late father left her eight hundred sprawling acres of sugarcane land in rural Louisiana is as mysterious as it was generous. Recognizing this as a chance to start over, Charley and her eleven-year-old daughter, Micah, say good-bye to Los Angeles. They arrive just in time for growing season but no amount of planning can prepare Charley for a Louisiana that’s mired in the past: as her judgmental but big-hearted grandmother tells her, cane farming is always going to be a white man’s business. As the sweltering summer unfolds, Charley must balance the overwhelming challenges of her farm with the demands of a homesick daughter, a bitter and troubled brother, and the startling desires of her own heart. Penguin has a rich tradition of publishing strong Southern debut fiction —from Sue Monk Kidd to Kathryn Stockett to Beth Hoffman. In Queen Sugar, we now have a debut from the African American point of view. Stirring in its storytelling of one woman against the odds and initimate in its exploration of the complexities of contemporary southern life, Queen Sugar is an unforgettable tale of endurance and hope.

     

  2. South Beach Cartel – Part 1 by Nisa Santiago
    ( Melodrama Publishing , 2/4/2014 , Paperback )
    TRIO OF TERROR Cartier Timmons is infuriated by the tragedy and vengeance inflicted upon her family. She’s making savage rounds through Miami until she can bring her own brand of hood justice to the cartel who messed with hers. After a reunion that seemed like a dream come true, Citi and her mother Ashanti clash heads in a power struggle. Ashanti plays her position as the head chick in charge, and Citi is ostracized from the family. With no money, she’s once again forced to make her way back to the throne. Apple is growing restless in Colombia with Kola and Eduardo. She’s tired of the controlling situation and wants to resume making money. Plus, she can’t let go of the idea of finding her daughter Peaches. The search takes her to Miami, where she runs into her old friend from New York, Cartier. When Apple, Cartier, and Citi meet up, there’s an instant realization that the three can take down their opponents and rule the MIA, inflict pain and taking their spots as the Queen B’s of Miami.

     

  3. The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation by David Brion Davis
    ( Knopf , 2/4/2014 , Hardcover )
    From the revered historian, the long-awaited conclusion of the magisterial history of slavery and emancipation in Western culture that has been nearly fifty years in the making. David Brion Davis is one of the foremost historians of the twentieth century, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Bancroft Prize, and nearly every award given by the historical profession. Now, with The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation, Davis brings his staggeringly ambitious, prizewinning trilogy on slavery in Western culture to a close. Once again, Davis offers original and penetrating insights into what slavery and emancipation meant to Americans. He explores how the Haitian Revolution respectively terrified and inspired white and black Americans, hovering over the antislavery debates like a bloodstained ghost, and he offers a surprising analysis of the complex and misunderstood significance of colonization—the project to move freed slaves back to Africa—to members of both races and all political persuasions. He vividly portrays the dehumanizing impact of slavery, as well as the generally unrecognized importance of freed slaves to abolition. Most of all, Davis presents the age of emancipation as a model for reform and as probably the greatest landmark of willed moral progress in human history.

     

  4. The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat (Vintage Contemporaries) by Edward Kelsey Moore
    ( Vintage , 2/4/2014 , Paperback )
    Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat diner in Plainview, Indiana is home away from home for Odette, Clarice, and Barbara Jean.  Dubbed The Supremes by high school pals in the tumultuous 1960s, they’ve weathered life’s storms for over four decades and counseled one another through marriage and children, happiness and the blues.  Now, however, they’re about to face their most challenging year yet. Proud, talented Clarice is struggling to keep up appearances as she deals with her husband’s humiliating infidelities; beautiful Barbara Jean is rocked by the tragic reverberations of a youthful love affair; and fearless Odette is about to embark on the most terrifying battle of her life. With wit, style and sublime talent, Edward Kelsey Moore brings together three devoted allies in a warmhearted novel that celebrates female friendship and second chances.

     

  5. A Deeper Love Inside: The Porsche Santiaga Story by Sister Souljah
    ( Atria/Emily Bestler Books , 2/18/2014 , Paperback )
    At last, mega-bestselling author Sister Souljah delivers the stunning sequel to The Coldest Winter Ever that fans have been eagerly waiting for. Frighteningly fierce, raw, and completely unpredictable, this coming-of-age adventure is woven with emotional intensity. A Deeper Love Inside is written in the words of Porsche Santiaga, Winter’s sharp-tongued, quick-witted younger sister. Porsche worships Winter. A natural born hustler, Porsche is also cut from the same cloth as her father, the infamous Ricky Santiaga. Passionate and loyal to the extreme, Porsche refuses to accept her new life in group homes, foster care, and juvenile detention after her wealthy family is torn apart. Porsche — unique, young, and beautiful — cries as much as she fights and uses whatever she has to reclaim her status. Unselfishly, she pushes to get back everything that ever belonged to her loving family.

     

  6. American Cocktail: A Colored Girl in the World by Anita Reynolds
    ( Harvard University Press , 2/24/2014 , Hardcover )
    This is the rollicking, never-before-published memoir of a fascinating woman with an uncanny knack for being in the right place in the most interesting times. Of racially mixed heritage, Anita Reynolds was proudly African American but often passed for Indian, Mexican, or Creole. Actress, dancer, model, literary critic, psychologist, but above all free-spirited provocateur, she was, as her Parisian friends nicknamed her, an American cocktail. One of the first black stars of the silent era, she appeared in Hollywood movies with Rudolph Valentino, attended Charlie Chaplin’s anarchist meetings, and studied dance with Ruth St. Denis. She moved to New York in the 1920s and made a splash with both Harlem Renaissance elites and Greenwich Village bohemians. An émigré in Paris, she fell in with the Left Bank avant garde, befriending Antonin Artaud, Man Ray, and Pablo Picasso. Next, she took up residence as a journalist in Barcelona during the Spanish Civil War and witnessed firsthand the growing menace of fascism. In 1940, as the Nazi panzers closed in on Paris, Reynolds spent the final days before the French capitulation as a Red Cross nurse, afterward making a mad dash for Lisbon to escape on the last ship departing Europe. In prose that perfectly captures the globetrotting nonchalance of its author, American Cocktail presents a stimulating, unforgettable self-portrait of a truly extraordinary woman.

     

  7. Scalawag: A White Southerner’s Journey through Segregation to Human Rights Activism by Edward H. Peeples
    ( University of Virginia Press , 2/21/2014 , Hardcover )
    Scalawag tells the surprising story of a white working-class boy who became an unlikely civil rights activist. Born in 1935 in Richmond, where he was sent to segregated churches and schools, Ed Peeples was taught the ethos and lore of white supremacy by every adult in his young life. That message came with an equally cruel one—that, as the child of a wage-earning single mother, he was destined for failure.But by age nineteen Peeples became what the whites in his world called a traitor to the race. Pushed by a lone teacher to think critically, Peeples found his way to the black freedom struggle and began a long life of activism. He challenged racism in his U.S. Navy unit and engaged in sit-ins and community organizing. Later, as a university professor, he agitated for good jobs, health care, and decent housing for all, pushed for the creation of African American studies courses at his university, and worked toward equal treatment for women, prison reform, and more. Peeples did most of his human rights work in his native Virginia, and his story reveals how institutional racism pervaded the Upper South as much as the Deep South.Covering fifty years’ participation in the long civil rights movement, Peeples’s gripping story brings to life an unsung activist culture to which countless forgotten individuals contributed, over time expanding their commitment from civil rights to other causes. This engrossing, witty tale of escape from what once seemed certain fate invites readers to reflect on how moral courage can transform a life.

     

  8. Fortune & Fame: A Novel by Victoria Christopher Murray
    ( Touchstone , 2/25/2014 , Paperback )
    Jasmine Cox Larson Bush and Rachel Jackson Adams have been through a lot together—from fighting for their husbands to become the head of the American Baptist Coalition to getting mixed up in a terrible murder. Now the frenemies have found themselves the stars of First Ladies, a much-anticipated new reality television show. Jasmine balks at the idea of airing her dirty laundry on national TV, but Rachel sees it as the perfect opportunity to take her brand to the next level. And if Rachel is in, so is Jasmine. All the cast members are women of God—how much drama can there be? Rachel and Jasmine know their own pasts are murky, but they’ll seem like choir girls when the secrets and sins of the others come to light. The two will once again have to form an unholy alliance to go up against these so-called Godly women who see the show as their chance to take them down—at any cost.

     

  9. The Price of Defiance: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss by Charles W. Eagles
    ( The University of North Carolina Press , 2/1/2014 , Paperback )
    When James Meredith enrolled as the first African American student at the University of Mississippi in 1962, the resulting riots produced more casualties than any other clash of the civil rights era. Eagles shows that the violence resulted from the university’s and the state’s long defiance of the civil rights movement and federal law. Ultimately, the price of such behavior–the price of defiance–was not only the murderous riot that rocked the nation and almost closed the university but also the nation’s enduring scorn for Ole Miss and Mississippi. Eagles paints a remarkable portrait of Meredith himself by describing his unusual family background, his personal values, and his service in the U.S. Air Force, all of which prepared him for his experience at Ole Miss.

     

  10. Malcolm X at Oxford Union: Racial Politics in a Global Era (Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities) by Saladin Ambar
    ( Oxford University Press, USA , 2/10/2014 , Hardcover )
    In 1964 Malcolm X was invited to debate at the Oxford Union Society at Oxford University. The topic of debate that evening was the infamous phrase from Barry Goldwater’s 1964 Republican Convention speech:Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice; moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue. At a time when Malcolm was traveling widely and advocating on behalf of blacks in America and other nations, his thirty minute speech at the Oxford Union stands out as one of the great addresses of the civil rights era. Delivered just months before his assassination, the speech followed a period in which Malcolm had traveled throughout Africa and much of the Muslim world. The journey broadened his political thought to encompass decolonization, the revolutions underway in the developing world, and the relationship between American blacks and non-white populations across the globe-including England. Facing off against debaters in one of world’s most elite institutions, he delivered a revolutionary message that tackled a staggering array of issues: the nature of national identity; US foreign policy in the developing world; racial politics at home; the experiences of black immigrants in England; and the nature of power in the contemporary world. It represents a moment when his thought had advanced to its furthest point, shedding the parochial concerns of previous years for an increasingly global and humanist approach to ushering in social change. Set to publish near the fiftieth anniversary of his death, Malcolm X at Oxford Union will reshape our understanding not only of the man himself, but world politics both then and now.

     

  11. Black Panther: The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas by Emory Douglas
    ( Rizzoli , 2/4/2014 , Hardcover )
    A reformatted and reduced price edition of the first book to show the provocative posters and groundbreaking graphics of the Black Panther Party. The Black Panther Party for Self Defense, formed in the aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965, sounded a defiant cry for an end to the institutionalized subjugation of African Americans. The Black Panther newspaper was founded to articulate the party’s message, and artist Emory Douglas became the paper’s art director and later the party’s minister of culture. Douglas’s artistic talents and experience proved a powerful combination: his striking collages of photographs and his own drawings combined to create some of the era’s most iconic images. This landmark book brings together a remarkable lineup of party insiders who detail the crafting of the party’s visual identity.

     

  12. Plantation Church: How African American Religion Was Born in Caribbean Slavery by Noel Leo Erskine
    ( Oxford University Press, USA , 2/6/2014 , Paperback )
    Noel Leo Erskine investigates the history of the Black Church as it developed both in the United States and the Caribbean after the arrival of enslaved Africans. Typically, when people talk about the Black Church they are referring to African-American churches in the U.S., but in fact, the majority of African slaves were brought to the Caribbean. It was there, Erskine argues, that the Black religious experience was born. The massive Afro-Caribbean population was able to establish a form of Christianity that preserved African Gods and practices, but fused them with Christian teachings, resulting in religions such as Cuba’s Santería. The Black religious experience in the U.S. was markedly different because African Americans were a political and cultural minority. The Plantation Church became a place of solace and resistance that provided its members with a sense of kinship, not only to each other but also to their ancestral past.Despite their common origins, the Caribbean and African American Church are almost never studied together. Plantation Church examines the parallel histories of these two strands of the Black Church, showing where their historical ties remain strong and where different circumstances have led them down unexpectedly divergent paths. The result will be a work that illuminates the histories, theologies, politics, and practices of both branches of the Black Church.

     

  13. Humbled (Urban Books) by Patricia Haley
    ( Urban Books , 2/25/2014 , Paperback )

     

  14. Sugar Hill: Harlem’s Historic Neighborhood by Carole Boston Weatherford
    ( Albert Whitman & Company , 2/1/2014 , Hardcover )
    Take a walk through Harlem’s Sugar Hill and meet all the amazing people who made this neighborhood legendary. With upbeat rhyming, read-aloud text, Sugar Hill celebrates the Harlem neighborhood that successful African Americans first called home during the 1920s. Children raised in Sugar Hill not only looked up to these achievers but also experienced art and culture at home, at church, and in the community. Books, music lessons, and art classes expanded their horizons beyond the narrow limits of segregation. Includes brief biographies of jazz greats Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Sonny Rollins, and Miles Davis; artists Aaron Douglas and Faith Ringgold; entertainers Lena Horne and the Nicholas Brothers; writer Zora Neale Hurston; civil rights leader W. E. B. DuBois and lawyer Thurgood Marshall.

     

  15. Willow by Tonya Cherie Hegamin
    ( Candlewick , 2/11/2014 , Hardcover )
    In 1848, an educated slave girl faces an inconceivable choice — between bondage and freedom, family and love.On one side of the Mason-Dixon Line lives fifteen-year-old Willow, her master’s favorite servant. She’s been taught to read and has learned to write. She believes her master is good to her and fears the rebel slave runaways. On the other side of the line is seventeen-year-old Cato, a black man, free born. It’s his personal mission to sneak as many fugitive slaves to freedom as he can. Willow’s and Cato’s lives are about to intersect, with life-changing consequences for both of them. Tonya Cherie Hegamin’s moving coming-of-age story is a poignant meditation on the many ways a person can be enslaved, and the force of will needed to be truly emancipated.

     

  16. Game World by C.J. Farley
    ( Black Sheep , 2/4/2014 , Hardcover )
    Dylan Rudee’s life is an epic fail. He’s bullied at school and plagued by seizures, until his videogame skills unlock a real-life fantasy world inside a new game. But now actual monsters are trying to kill him. In order to save his sister and his friends, Dylan must solve the game’s dangerous mystery in three days.

     

  17. Southern Cross the Dog by Bill Cheng
    ( Ecco , 2/4/2014 , Paperback )
    In the tradition of Cormac McCarthy and Flannery O’Connor, Bill Cheng’s Southern Cross the Dog is an epic literary debut in which the bonds between three childhood friends are upended by the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. In its aftermath, one young man must choose between the lure of the future and the claims of the past. Having lost virtually everything in the fearsome storm—home, family, first love—Robert Chatham embarks on an odyssey that takes him through the deep South, from the desperation of a refugee camp to the fiery and raucous brothel Hotel Beau-Miel and into the Mississippi hinterland, where he joins a crew hired to clear the swamp and build a dam. Along his journey he encounters piano-playing hustlers, ne’er-do-well Klansmen, well-intentioned whores, and a family of fur trappers, the L’Etangs, whose very existence is threatened by the swamp-clearing around them. The L’Etang brothers are fierce and wild but there is something soft about their cousin Frankie, possibly the only woman capable of penetrating Robert’s darkest places and overturning his conviction that he’s marked by the devil. Teeming with language that renders both the savage beauty and complex humanity of our shared past, Southern Cross the Dog is a tour de force that heralds the arrival of a major new voice in fiction.

     

  18. Geographies of Liberation: The Making of an Afro-Arab Political Imaginary (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture) by Alex Lubin
    ( The University of North Carolina Press , 2/10/2014 , Paperback )
    In this absorbing transnational history, Alex Lubin reveals the vital connections between African American political thought and the people and nations of the Middle East. Spanning the 1850s through the present, and set against a backdrop of major political and cultural shifts around the world, the book demonstrates how international geopolitics, including the ascendance of liberal internationalism, established the conditions within which blacks imagined their freedom and, conversely, the ways in which various Middle Eastern groups have understood and used the African American freedom struggle to shape their own political movements. Lubin extends the framework of the black freedom struggle beyond the familiar geographies of the Atlantic world and sheds new light on the linked political, social, and intellectual imaginings of African Americans, Palestinians, Arabs, and Israeli Jews. This history of intellectual exchange, Lubin argues, has forged political connections that extend beyond national and racial boundaries.

     

  19. Harmony Cabins (A Finding Home Novel) by Regina Hart
    ( Dafina , 2/4/2014 , Mass Market Paperback )

     

Bestselling Books in January 2014

The bestselling African American books by or about African Americans, published in January 2014, from Amazon.com.

  1. The Wars of Reconstruction: The Brief, Violent History of America’s Most Progressive Era by Douglas R. Egerton
    ( Bloomsbury Press , 1/21/2014 , Hardcover )
    By 1870, just five years after Confederate surrender and thirteen years after the Dred Scott decision ruled blacks ineligible for citizenship, Congressional action had ended slavery and given the vote to black men. That same year, Hiram Revels and Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first African-American U.S. senator and congressman respectively. In South Carolina, only twenty years after the death of arch-secessionist John C. Calhoun, a black man, Jasper J. Wright, took a seat on the state’s Supreme Court. Not even the most optimistic abolitionists had thought such milestones would occur in their lifetimes. The brief years of Reconstruction marked the United States’ most progressive moment prior to the civil rights movement. Previous histories of Reconstruction have focused on Washington politics. But in this sweeping, prodigiously researched narrative, Douglas Egerton brings a much bigger, even more dramatic story into view, exploring state and local politics and tracing the struggles of some fifteen hundred African-American officeholders, in both the North and South, who fought entrenched white resistance. Tragically, their movement was met by ruthless violence—not just riotous mobs, but also targeted assassination. With stark evidence, Egerton shows that Reconstruction, often cast as a “failure” or a doomed experiment, was rolled back by murderous force. The Wars of Reconstruction is a major and provocative contribution to American history.

     

  2. Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century by Monique W. Morris
    ( New Press, The , 1/28/2014 , Paperback )
    A comprehensive guide filled with contemporary facts and figures on African Americans—is an essential reference for anyone attempting to fathom the complex state of our nation. With fascinating and often surprising information on everything from incarceration rates, lending practices, and the arts to marriage, voting habits, and green jobs, the contextualized material in this book will better attune readers to telling trends while challenging commonly held, yet often misguided, perceptions. A compilation that at once highlights measures of incredible progress and enumerates the disparate impacts of social policies and practices, this book is a critical tool for advocates, educators, and policy makers. Black Stats offers indispensable information that is sure to enlighten discussions and provoke debates about the quality of Black life in the United States today—and help chart the path to a better future.There are less than a quarter-million Black public school teachers in the U.S.—representing just 7 percent of all teachers in public schools.Approximately half of the Black population in the United States lives in neighborhoods that have no White residents.In the five years before the Great Recession, the number of Black-owned businesses in the United States increased by 61 percent.A 2010 study found that 41 percent of Black youth feel that rap music videos should be more political.There are no Black owners or presidents of an NFL franchise team.78 percent of Black Americans live within 30 miles of a coal-fired power plant, compared with 56 percent of White Americans.

     

  3. Still The Baddest Bitch (Bitch Series) by Joy Deja King
    ( A King Production , 1/29/2014 , Paperback )
    Aaliyah Mills Carter has to step up and watch the throne, to prove she has what it takes to be the Baddest Bitch. Chaos has always surrounded her family but now death may have hit too close to home. There are so many questions but not enough answers. Aaliyah is determined to find out if she’s been sleeping with the enemy and has Precious Cummings finally ran out of lives? Find out in Still The Baddest Bitch.

     

  4. How I Discovered Poetry by Marilyn Nelson
    ( Dial , 1/14/2014 , Hardcover )
    A powerful and thought-provoking Civil Rights era memoir from one of America’s most celebrated poets.   Looking back on her childhood in the 1950s, Newbery Honor winner and National Book Award finalist Marilyn Nelson tells the story of her development as an artist and young woman through fifty eye-opening poems. Readers are given an intimate portrait of her growing self-awareness and artistic inspiration along with a larger view of the world around her: racial tensions, the Cold War era, and the first stirrings of the feminist movement.   A first-person account of African-American history, this is a book to study, discuss, and treasure.

     

  5. Promises Kept: Raising Black Boys to Succeed in School and in Life by Dr. Joe Brewster
    ( Spiegel & Grau , 1/14/2014 , Paperback )
    Regardless of how wealthy or poor their parents are, all black boys must confront and surmount the “achievement gap”: a divide that shows up not only in our sons’ test scores, but in their social and emotional development, their physical well-being, and their outlook on life. As children, they score as high on cognitive tests as their peers, but at some point, the gap emerges. Why?   This is the question Joe Brewster, M.D., and Michèle Stephenson asked when their own son, Idris, began struggling in a new school. As they filmed his experiences for their award-winning documentary American Promise, they met an array of researchers who had not only identified the reasons for the gap, but had come up with practical, innovative solutions to close it. In Promises Kept, they explain   • how to influence your son’s brain before he’s even born • how to tell the difference between authoritarian and authoritative discipline—and why it matters • how to create an educational program for your son that matches his needs • how to prepare him for explicit and implicit racism in school and in the wider world • how to help your child develop resilience, self-discipline, emotional intelligence, and a positive outlook that will last a lifetime

     

  6. The Logic of American Politics, 6th Edition by Samuel Kernell
    ( CQ Press , 1/10/2014 , Paperback )
    After observing the strains of intense partisanship and divided government, many Americans are wondering what logic, if any, can be found in politics. The new Sixth Edition of The Logic of American Politics reaffirms this best-seller’s place as the most accessible smart book on the market. Consistently praised for its engaging narrative, the book hooks students with great storytelling while arming them with a toolkit of institutional design concepts-command, veto, agenda control, voting rules, delegation.

     

  7. His Day Is Done: A Nelson Mandela Tribute by Maya Angelou
    ( Random House , 1/21/2014 , Hardcover )
    He was a son of Africa who became father to a nation and, for billions of people around the world, a beacon of hope, courage, and perseverance in the face of opposition. Now, acclaimed poet Maya Angelou honors the life and remarkable soul of Nelson Mandela, former president of South Africa and Nobel laureate.   In His Day is Done, Angelou delivers an authentically heartfelt and elegant tribute to Mandela, who stood as David to the mighty Goliath of Apartheid and who, after twenty-seven years of unjust imprisonment on the notorious Robben Island, emerged with “His stupendous heart intact / His gargantuan will / Hale and hearty” to lead his people into a new era.   This poignant work of gratitude and remembrance offers condolences to the resilient people of South Africa on the loss of their beloved “Madiba” and celebrates a man like no other, whose life and work changed the world.

     

  8. The Secret of Magic by Deborah Johnson
    ( Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam , 1/21/2014 , Hardcover )
    In 1946, a young female attorney from New York City attempts the impossible: attaining justice for a black man in the Deep South.   Regina Robichard works for Thurgood Marshall, who receives an unusual letter asking the NAACP to investigate the murder of a returning black war hero. It is signed by M. P. Calhoun, the most reclusive author in the country.   As a child, Regina was captivated by Calhoun’s The Secret of Magic, a novel in which white and black children played together in a magical forest. Once down in Mississippi, Regina finds that nothing in the South is as it seems. She must navigate the muddy waters of racism, relationships, and her own tragic past. The Secret of Magic brilliantly explores the power of stories and those who tell them.  

     

  9. Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell
    ( Chronicle Books , 1/14/2014 , Hardcover )
    In exuberant verse and stirring pictures, Patricia Hruby Powell and Christian Robinson create an extraordinary portrait of the passionate performer and civil rights advocate Josephine Baker, the woman who worked her way from the slums of St. Louis to the grandest stages in the world. Meticulously researched by both author and artist, Josephine’s powerful story of struggle and triumph is an inspiration and a spectacle, just like the legend herself.

     

  10. Without Mercy: The Stunning True Story of Race, Crime, and Corruption in the Deep South by David Beasley
    ( St. Martin’s Press , 1/28/2014 , Hardcover )
    On December 9, 1938, the state of Georgia executed six black men in eighty-one  minutes in  Tattnall Prison’s electric chair. The executions were a record for the state that still stands today. The new prison, built with funds from FDR’s New Deal, as well as the fact that the men were tried and executed rather than lynched were thought to be a sign of progress. They were anything but. While those men were arrested, convicted, sentenced, and executed in as little as six weeks—E. D. Rivers, the governor of the state, oversaw a pardon racket for white killers and criminals, allowed the Ku Klux Klan to infiltrate his administration, and bankrupted the state. Race and wealth were all that determined whether or not a man lived or died. There was no progress. There was no justice.
    David Beasley’s Without Mercy is the harrowing true story of the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the violent death throes of the Klan, but most of all it is the story of the stunning injustice of these executions and how they have seared distrust of the legal system into the consciousness of the Deep South, and it is a story that will forever be a testament to the death penalty’s appalling inequality that continues to plague our nation

     

  11. Searching for Sarah Rector: The Richest Black Girl in America by Tonya Bolden
    ( Harry N. Abrams , 1/7/2014 , Hardcover )
      Sarah Rector was once famously hailed as “the richest black girl in America.” Set against the backdrop of American history, her tale encompasses the creation of Indian Territory, the making of Oklahoma, and the establishment of black towns and oil-rich boomtowns. Rector acquired her fortune at the age of eleven. This is both her story and that of children just like her: one filled with ups and downs amid bizarre goings-on and crimes perpetrated by greedy and corrupt adults. From a trove of primary documents, including court and census records and interviews with family members, author Tonya Bolden painstakingly pieces together the events of Sarah’s life and the lives of those around her.

     

  12. Dirty Divorce part 4 by Miss KP
    ( Life Changing Books , 1/20/2014 , Paperback )
    The Dirty Divorce Trilogy has been a wild ride and readers just can t get enough of the Sanchez family drama. In Dirty Divorce Part 4 the offsprings of Rich Sanchez, Juan and Denie don t disappoint. Juan is determined to become his own man speeding through the fast lane of money, cars, and women. As he dominates the industry his father once ruled, he soon learns that being top dog carries a heavy price tag. While Juan constantly lives trying to dodge his demise, Denie stares death straight in the face as she keeps secrets buried to stay the baddest chick in the DMV. Denie is willing to put others at risk in order to live the life she s become accustomed to. While Juan and Denie grow up repeating the vicious cycle Rich created, someone familiar watches in the shadows for revenge to ruin the Sanchez empire. Relationships are tested, lives are lost, and loyalty goes out the window as the Sanchez family battles to stay on top of the game that ruined them from the start.

     

  13. Little Green: An Easy Rawlins Novel (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard) by Walter Mosley
    ( Vintage , 1/28/2014 , Paperback )
    In Little Green, Walter Mosley’s acclaimed detective Easy Rawlins returns from the brink of death to investigate the dark side of that haven for Los Angeles hippies, the Sunset Strip. He’s soon back in top form, cruising the gloriously psychedelic mean streets of L.A. with his murderous sidekick, Mouse. They’ve been hired to look for a young black man, Evander “Little Green” Noon, who disappeared during an acid trip. Fueled by an elixir called Gator’s Blood, Easy experiences a physical, spiritual, and emotional resurrection, but peace and love soon give way to murder and mayhem.

     

  14. Negroes and the Gun: The Black Tradition of Arms by Nicholas Johnson
    ( Prometheus Books , 1/14/2014 , Paperback )
    Chronicling the under-appreciated black tradition of bearing arms for self-defense, this book presents an array of examples reaching back to the pre—Civil War era that demonstrate a willingness of African American men and women to use firearms when necessary to defend their families and communities. From Frederick Douglass’s advice to keep “a good revolver” handy as defense against slave catchers to the armed self-protection of Monroe, North Carolina, blacks against the KKK chronicled in Robert Williams’s Negroes with Guns, it is clear that owning firearms was commonplace in the black community.     Nicholas Johnson points out that this story has been submerged because it is hard to reconcile with the dominant narrative of nonviolence during the civil rights era. His book, however, resolves that tension by showing how the black tradition of arms maintained and demanded a critical distinction between private self-defense and political violence.      Johnson also addresses the unavoidable issue of young black men with guns and the toll that gun violence takes on many in the inner city. He shows how complicated this issue is by highlighting the surprising diversity of views on gun ownership in the black community. In fact, recent Supreme Court affirmations of the right to bear arms resulted from cases led by black plaintiffs.     Surprising and informative, this well-researched book strips away many stock assumptions of conventional wisdom on the issue of guns and the black freedom struggle.

     

  15. Foreign Gods, Inc. by Okey Ndibe
    ( Soho Press , 1/14/2014 , Hardcover )
    Foreign Gods, Inc., tells the story of Ike, a New York-based Nigerian cab driver who sets out to steal the statue of an ancient war deity from his home village and sell it to a New York gallery. Ike’s plan is fueled by desperation. Despite a degree in economics from a major American college, his strong accent has barred him from the corporate world. Forced to eke out a living as a cab driver, he is unable to manage the emotional and material needs of a temperamental African American bride and a widowed mother demanding financial support. When he turns to gambling, his mounting losses compound his woes. And so he travels back to Nigeria to steal the statue, where he has to deal with old friends, family, and a mounting conflict between those in the village who worship the deity, and those who practice Christianity. A meditation on the dreams, promises and frustrations of the immigrant life in America; the nature and impact of religious conflicts; an examination of the ways in which modern culture creates or heightens infatuation with the exotic, including the desire to own strange objects and hanker after ineffable illusions; and an exploration of the shifting nature of memory, Foreign Gods is a brilliant work of fiction that illuminates our globally interconnected world like no other.

     

  16. Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America by Ayana Byrd
    ( St. Martin’s Griffin , 1/28/2014 , Paperback )
    Two world wars, the Civil Rights movement, and a Jheri curl later, Blacks in America continue to have a complex and convoluted relationship with their hair. From the antebellum practice of shaving the head in an attempt to pass as a free person to the 1998 uproar over a White third-grade teacher’s reading of the book Nappy Hair, the issues surrounding Black hair continue to linger as we enter the twenty-first century.Hair Story is a historical and anecdotal exploration of Black Americans’ tangled hair roots. A chronological look at the culture and politics behind the ever-changing state of Black hair from fifteenth-century Africa to the present-day United States, it ties the personal to the political and the popular.
    Read about:
    * Why Black American slaves used items like axle grease and eel skin to straighten their hair.
    * How a Mexican chemist straightened Black hair using his formula for turning sheep’s wool into a minklike fur.
    * How the Afro evolved from militant style to mainstream fashion trend.
    * What prompted the creation of the Jheri curl and the popular style’s fall from grace.
    * The story behind Bo Derek’s controversial cornrows and the range of reactions they garnered.
    Major figures in the history of Black hair are presented, from early hair-care entrepreneurs Annie Turnbo Malone and Madam C. J. Walker to unintended hair heroes like Angela Davis and Bob Marley. Celebrities, stylists, and cultural critics weigh in on the burgeoning sociopolitical issues surrounding Black hair, from the historically loaded terms good and bad hair, to Black hair in the workplace, to mainstream society’s misrepresentation and misunderstanding of kinky locks. Hair Story is the book that Black Americans can use as a benchmark for tracing a unique aspect of their history, and it’s a book that people of all races will celebrate as the reference guide for understanding Black hair.

     

  17. Malcolm Little: The Boy Who Grew Up to Become Malcolm X by Ilyasah Shabazz
    ( Atheneum Books for Young Readers , 1/7/2014 , Hardcover )
    Malcolm X grew to be one of America’s most influential figures. But first, he was a boy named Malcolm Little. Written by his daughter, this inspiring picture book biography celebrates a vision of freedom and justice.Bolstered by the love and wisdom of his large, warm family, young Malcolm Little was a natural born leader. But when confronted with intolerance and a series of tragedies, Malcolm’s optimism and faith were threatened. He had to learn how to be strong and how to hold on to his individuality. He had to learn self-reliance. Together with acclaimed illustrator AG Ford, Ilyasah Shabazz gives us a unique glimpse into the childhood of her father, Malcolm X, with a lyrical story that carries a message that resonates still today—that we must all strive to live to our highest potential.

     

  18. Slavery’s Exiles: The Story of the American Maroons by Sylviane A. Diouf
    ( NYU Press , 1/17/2014 , Hardcover )
    Over more than two centuries men, women, and children escaped from slavery to make the Southern wilderness their home. They hid in the mountains of Virginia and the low swamps of South Carolina; they stayed in the neighborhood or paddled their way to secluded places; they buried themselves underground or built comfortable settlements. Known as maroons, they lived on their own or set up communities in swamps or other areas where they were not likely to be discovered. Although well-known, feared, celebrated or demonized at the time, the maroons whose stories are the subject of this book have been forgotten, overlooked by academic research that has focused on the Caribbean and Latin America. Who the American maroons were, what led them to choose this way of life over alternatives, what forms of marronage they created, what their individual and collective lives were like, how they organized themselves to survive, and how their particular story fits into the larger narrative of slave resistance are questions that this book seeks to answer. To survive, the American maroons reinvented themselves, defied slave society, enforced their own definition of freedom and dared create their own alternative to what the country had delineated as being black men and women’s proper place. Audacious, self-confident, autonomous, sometimes self-sufficient, always self-governing; their very existence was a repudiation of the basic tenets of slavery. Sylviane A. Diouf is an award-winning historian specializing in the history of the African Diaspora, African Muslims, the slave trade and slavery. She is the author of Servants of Allah: African Muslims Enslaved in the Americas (NYU Press, 2013) and Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America, and the editor of Fighting the Slave Trade: West African Strategies.

     

  19. The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin
    ( Roaring Brook Press , 1/21/2014 , Hardcover )
    An astonishing civil rights story from Newbery Honor winner and National Book Award finalist Steve Sheinkin. On July 17, 1944, a massive explosion rocked the segregated Navy base at Port Chicago, California, killing more than 300 sailors who were at the docks, critically injuring off-duty men in their bunks, and shattering windows up to a mile away. On August 9th, 244 men refused to go back to work until unsafe and unfair conditions at the docks were addressed. When the dust settled, fifty were charged with mutiny, facing decades in jail and even execution. This is a fascinating story of the prejudice that faced black men and women in America’s armed forces during World War II, and a nuanced look at those who gave their lives in service of a country where they lacked the most basic rights.

     

  20. Baby Momma 3 (Urban Books) by Ni’chelle Genovese
    ( Urban Books , 1/28/2014 , Paperback )

     

Bestselling Books in December 2013

The bestselling African American books by or about African Americans, published in December 2013.

  1. He Loves Me, He Loves You Not by Mychea
    ( Good2go Publishing , 12/1/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    It’s been years since their parents were murdered. Twin sisters Shia and Leigh are trying to readjust to life, while caring for their baby sister Remi. With the exception of Leigh s angry, dramatic mood swings every now and then, everything seems to be going great. That is until Demetri; the mysterious stranger enters their midst, and falls right in the path of the newly single Shia. After dating Trent for so long, she is looking for a man to treat her like a queen, and Demetri is heaven sent…until inexplicable things begin to happen. When one of her sisters goes missing, and was last seen with Trent and Demetri, Shia suddenly realizes no one is who they appear to be. The seemingly normal world she and her sisters recreated is destroyed. Shia begins to realize that her parents’ past deeds are coming back to haunt them all and no one can be trusted. It is unclear to Shia which man truly has her best interest – and safety – at heart. Staring at the wilted flower she calls life, she is slowly pulling back the layers to try to understand if He loves me, he loves you not…

     

  2. Tears of a Hustler PT 1 by Silk White
    ( Good2go Publishing , 12/18/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    Ali is a drug dealer slash business man who tries to change the way the game is played by giving back to the community. But at the same time he has to keep a close eye on his childhood crime partner G-Money who has a strong hatred for the police. Ali’s life take a series turn when a local rival a crooked cop, his pregnant girlfriend and his little brother comes into the picture.Once again Silk White takes readers deep into an underworld and night life. A gritty street tale that everyone will enjoy.Now how it all begins!

     

  3. Private Sins (Three Rivers Series: Book 1) by Brenda Barrett
    ( Jamaica Treasures , 12/12/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    Kelly was in deep trouble; her husband was a pastor and she his loyal first lady. Well she was…until she had an affair with Chris; the first elder of their church. And now she was pregnant with his child. Could she keep the secret from her husband and pretend that all was well? Or should she confess her private sin and let the chips fall where they may?

     

  4. The Last King (The Last King: Book I, Serial #1) by A.Yamina Collins
    ( DeeBooks Publishing, LLC , 12/26/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    Twenty-eight year Emmy Hughes has never quite fit in—she’s six feet tall, dark-skinned, and daydreams of being Galadriel from Lord of the Rings. But when she is badly injured in a car accident that kills her mother, Emmy does not dream of fantastical worlds anymore—she just wants her shattered life to be normal again.

     

  5. Trap-A-Rella 2 by Tony Steele
    ( Felony Books , 12/13/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    At the height of her street career, Nisey Davis is charged with trafficking and faces a fate that has befallen many hustlers before her—federal prison time. She isn’t too optimistic of the outcome, so she nominates her sister, Shanise Davis, as the leader of the Trap-A-Rellas. This decision doesn’t go over well with every member of the clique … and the betrayal begins.

     

  6. Saving Face (Mount Faith Series: Book 1) by Brenda Barrett
    ( Jamaica Treasures , 12/12/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    Edward Carlisle, the president of Mount Faith University is dead. Natasha Rowe and her partner Harry Campbell are asked to go under cover to investigate what appears to be a murder.

     

  7. Wahida Clark Presents 11 Book Boxed Set (Holiday Bonus Pack) by Wahida Clark
    ( Wahida Clark Presents Publishing , 12/15/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    SUPER Exclusive Holiday Bonus from Wahida Clark Presents Publishing. 11 full-length novels from “Wahida Clark’s” hottest authors. Thuggin’. Hustlin’. Wisdom. Romance. Scandal. Mystery. And Murder. From 11 Best-Selling authors comes 11 Best-Selling books! All combined in this Limited Boxed Set. This offer is Wahida Clark Presents way of saying, Thanks for your unwavering support!

     

  8. Criminal Romance Boxed Set (18 Book Boxed Set) by David Weaver
    ( SBR Publications , 12/12/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    The ultimate modern day Bonnie and Clyde love stories from 18 bestselling authors all combined for this one bundle.BOXED SET INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING TITLES:Bankroll Squad by David WeaverThe Union by Tremayne JohnsonThe Versace League by ShanCountry Girls by Blake KarringtonTeflon Mafia by Alicia Howard and Drusilla MarsGhetto Girl Games by Torica TymesThe Throne by Cole HartThug Luv by JazmyneTruth Hurts, Lies Kill by Raymond FrancisThe Streets Don’t Luv Me by Alicia HartleyLove and War by Jackie ChanelI See Dead People by Joe AwsumThe Real Blockwives of Atlanta by Sevyn McCrayLove in the Chamber by Rasheed CarterHard by Anjela DayBallad of Bad Bitch by Ms. BamKush and Cologne by Envy SealHandbag Mafia by Chanel Jones#1 on Amazon’s Movers and Shakers List***Debuted at #63 overall in the Kindle store!Over 1,300 units were sold in the first 24 hours.18 FULL LENGTH books for $1.Limited Time ONLY!!!! HOT PRODUCT

     

  9. Curvy Girls Do It Married and Dirty: Short Erotic Romance – Book 5 by Ulriche Kacey Padraige
    ( , 12/16/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    Beth was always a little bit surprised that her little jealousy of Georgia’s life appeared. She searched her soul but she could not figure out why she would feel this way.

     

  10. A CHILD OF A CRACKHEAD II by Shameek Speight
    ( True Glory Publications , 12/23/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    With the notorious Black Ice missing or assumed dead, Michael Jr. and Rachel try to live a normal life. Will Rachel be able to fight the urge of wanting to get high? Will Michael Jr. be able to fight the blood that’s running through his veins? Or will he be subcumbed to what he hates most, the demon he calls a father or the life of being once a child of a crack head break him?

     

  11. A CHILD OF A CRACKHEAD (Part 1) by shameek speight
    ( True Glory Publications , 12/19/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    He watched as she screamed and yelled with every strike that the man, made to her face. From her mouth, she spit blood that was rolling down her face. He continued to watch the 6’2 dark skin man repeatedly hit and kick the woman in the stomach, again and again. Noooo stop! please stop! as she yelled his closed fist went upside her head. Michael knew he had to do something to stop the man from beating the beautiful brown skin woman, with tears running down his own face he yelled, Daddy stop! Daddy stop!, as he ran his 6 year old frame between his father and mother. Daddy stop hitting mommy!, All he felt was his father’s big black hands grasp him around his neck and squeeze until he couldnt breathe and threw him across the room. Micheal sat on the floor crying. Partly because of the pain he felt, but mostly because of the beating his mother was getting. How does Micheal, child of a crack head, fight to stay a live ? what will he face and those he truly love ? and do they survive the terror of the man they call Black ice. This story tells the countless beating’s, killing’s, lies, infidelity and betrayels of a crack head and how a mother and child survive the street life

     

  12. Jade Jones Presents 6 Book Box Set by Jade Jones
    ( Jaded Publications , 12/25/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    SIX BOOKS FOR ONE AWESOME PRICE!!!

     

  13. From the Streets to the Sheets Platinum 20 Book Box Set (G Street Chronicles Presents) by George Sherman Hudson
    ( G Street Chronicles , 12/16/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    • Set includes 20 books from some of the top rated authors from the G Street Chronicles camp.

     

  14. The Pleasure of Pain 2 by Shameek Speight
    ( TRUE GLORY PUBLISHING , 12/21/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    Pleasure of pain 2 returns with more action and bloodshed than ever with more drama, secrets and lies are all at the forefront. With the F.B.I and the Santiago drug family along with the Asia mafia on their backs, Tess, Iris and Vanessa along with new comer Layla have no choice but to head over sea’s and do what they do best. With new hidden identities they reinvent themselves and become known under the new alias as the Teflon Divas, becoming the world’s most deadly assassins. Walk with Tess as she try to cope with the loss of her true love Bless while seeking undying answers to the killer behind it all or will her loyalty to the only people she trust blind her from seeking the truth that she needs to be a peace with it all? With ulterior motives hidden for over five years and undying infatuation with Tess, Will Iris jealous and over possessiveness cause her to snap and reveal her true colors as to who she really is? Find out as loyalties and friendships are tested, hearts are broken and a twist that will shock the world in this highly anticipated sequel.

     

  15. Trapped In Paradise by Deatri King-Bey
    ( , 12/15/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    After escaping an abusive marriage, Saundra Write swore never to allow anyone to trap her again. Then comes along Jeremy King, the kind of man any woman would beg to be trapped in paradise with.

     

  16. Raw Freaks (Gay Urban Erotica Sampler) by Gavin ML Fletcher
    ( Black Queer Radical Books , 12/26/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    Raw Freaks: Gay Urban Erotica Sampler is a collection of five, hot, erotic gay stories from Gavin ML Fletcher featuring black and Hispanic characters engaging in raunchy gay sex.

     

  17. Rayqelle’s Revenge -Book 1- (RATCHET) by Shon Cole Black
    ( clandestine, 12/30/2013, Kindle Edition )
    “RATCHET” is the story of Miss Rayqelle Davis; the stepdaughter of a Chicago police officer who grows up in a seriously dysfunctional home and turns to the streets as a means of escape.

     

  18. The Doctor’s Secret Bride – Book One (Billionaire Brides of Granite Falls) by Ana E Ross
    ( Ana E Ross , 12/10/2013 , Kindle Edition )
    Book One:  He must choose between love and loyalty…Michelle Carter has been down on her luck since the day she was born. So it comes as no surprise when through a series of unfortunate events, she finds herself jobless, penniless, and practically homeless. In a desperate attempt to get back on her feet, Michelle accepts a job as a nanny, and finds it absolutely impossible to resist the sexual magnetism of her handsome, sexy billionaire boss–but resist she must for as long as she could, especially since she’s keeping secrets from him. Believing that his late wife betrayed him with another man, falling in love again is the last thing Dr. Erik LaCrosse wants to do. But fall, he does, and so hard, he secretly marries the alluring nanny from the wrong side of the tracks. However, when he unearths a disturbing secret from Michelle’s past, Erik must choose between his loyalty to a dead woman and the love burning in his heart for one who is very much alive.

     

Bestselling Books in November 2013

The bestselling African American books by or about African Americans, published in November 2013.

  1. Saving Face (Mount Faith Series: Book 1) by Brenda Barrett
    (Jamaica Treasures, 2013-11-13, Kindle Edition)
    Edward Carlisle, the president of Mount Faith University is dead. Natasha Rowe and her partner Harry Campbell are asked to go under cover to investigate what appears to be a murder.

     

  2. Cross My Heart (Alex Cross) by James Patterson
    (Little, Brown and Company, 2013-11-25, Kindle Edition)
    James Patterson raises the stakes to their highest level, ever-when Alex Cross becomes the obsession of a genius of menace set on proving that he is the greatest mind in the history of crime.Detective Alex Cross is a family man at heart–nothing matters more to him than his children, his grandmother, and his wife Bree. His love of his family is his anchor, and gives him the strength to confront evil in his work. One man knows this deeply, and uses Alex’s strength as a weapon against him in the most unsettling and unexpected novel of James Patterson’s career.When the ones Cross loves are in danger, he will do anything to protect them. If he does anything to protect them, they will die.CROSS MY HEART is the most powerful Alex Cross novel ever, propelled by the ever-ingenious mind of James Patterson, the world’s #1 bestselling writer.

     

  3. SERGEI (Her Russian Protector #5) by Roxie Rivera
    (Night Works Books, 2013-11-12, Kindle Edition)
    After losing her older brother in a violent robbery, wedding gown designer Bianca Bradshaw refuses to date men with criminal ties. She’s never been tempted to cross that line—until Sergei.

     

  4. Undisputed Truth by Mike Tyson
    (Blue Rider Press, 2013-11-12, Kindle Edition)
    A bare-knuckled, tell-all memoir from Mike Tyson, the onetime heavyweight champion of the world—and a legend both in and out of the ring. Philosopher, Broadway headliner, fighter, felon—Mike Tyson has defied stereotypes, expectations, and a lot of conventional wisdom during his three decades in the public eye. Bullied as a boy in the toughest, poorest neighborhood in Brooklyn, Tyson grew up to become one of the most thrilling and ferocious boxers of all time—and the youngest heavyweight champion ever. But his brilliance in the ring was often compromised by reckless behavior. Years of hard partying, violent fights, and criminal proceedings took their toll: by 2003, Tyson had hit rock bottom, a convicted felon, completely broke, the punch line to a thousand bad late-night jokes. Yet he fought his way back; the man who once admitted being addicted “to everything” regained his success, his dignity, and the love of his family. With a triumphant one-man stage show, his unforgettable performances in the Hangover films, and his newfound happiness and stability as a father and husband, Tyson’s story is an inspiring American original. Brutally honest, raw, and often hilarious, Tyson chronicles his tumultuous highs and lows in the same sincere, straightforward manner we have come to expect from this legendary athlete. A singular journey from Brooklyn’s ghettos to worldwide fame to notoriety, and, finally, to a tranquil wisdom, Undisputed Truth is not only a great sports memoir but an autobiography for the ages.

     

  5. Massive Monroe (Things You Can’t Tell Mama) by D T Pollard
    (Book Express, 2013-11-15, Kindle Edition)
    Kevin “Massive” Monroe seemed to be on top of the world. Women flocked to him because of his special gift, but that was not always the case. Kevin Monroe was once a young man with a body image problem. Due to the unusually large size of a particular body part Kevin was ridiculed by other boys when he started playing sports in school and was given the nickname of Massive Monroe. Kevin was embarrassed and thought he had a physical defect which caused him to become shy and withdrawn. A woman unexpectedly came into Kevin’s life and convinced him that nothing was wrong with him at all, in fact, what was once a source of embarrassment became a point of pride. The woman that turned his attitude around left his life for years before suddenly returning, but she told Kevin that his future needed to be with someone else. Kevin “Massive” Monroe did things to women that other men never had before, but would that help or hurt him in his quest to find the love of his life?

     

  6. There’s A Thin Line: Book 1-Legal Reichs (Josef and Blair Series) by Ronin Schtihl Daire
    (Trisha A. Lindsey, 2013-11-15, Kindle Edition)
    Finally, the first book in the finished Josef and Blair Series is available! Blair Aikman is a Female Black Anti-Terrorist Agent, who works for the new Shadow Agency, which has been formed to combat the new threat of terrorism within the borders of the United States. Her directive: Eliminate the threat posed by Robert Lee Dyson, leader of the Aryan Brotherhood Nation, who is determined to join the strength of the thirty major Neo-Nazi Organizations in the U.S.

     

  7. Real Bitches Do Real Things by Keesh Washington
    (Felony Books, 2013-11-10, Kindle Edition)
    Los Angeles detective, Matt Figg, has been having a hard time nabbing Kamau and Neeta Bryant, two of America’s most wanted drug kinpins. And when a prominent member of their criminal empire is finally apprehended, prosecutors give her immunity to tell her story. Detective Figg is the expert interrogator.

     

  8. The Pastor’s Lover 2 – The Pastor’s Lover 2 (Things You Can’t Tell Mama) by D T Pollard
    (Book Express, 2013-11-12, Kindle Edition)
    The Pastor’s Lover 2 – Unholy Triangle – Sequel to highly acclaimed The Pastor’s Lover
    Tasha Johnson, the wife of Reverend Kendrick Johnson, found her soul in turmoil after she stopped by the church offices after hours and heard a woman screaming in sexual ecstasy behind the closed door of her husband’s office. Tasha also heard her husband’s voice urging this unknown woman to give herself to him. Tasha ran from the church and eventually ended up in the arms of a most unlikely lover, but that’s not where everything ended. Kendrick, Tasha and Tasha’s secret lover all collided in the most unexpected fashion ever as Kendrick caught them in the act and he was shocked to discover the identity of his wife’s lover. Would Tasha and Pastor Kendrick Johnson’s marriage and church survive the shock waves caused by their unholy love triangle?

     

  9. Rayqelle’s Risk -Book 2- (RATCHET) by Shon Cole Black
    (Clandestine International, 2013-11-13, Kindle Edition)
    Straight from the streets of Miami’s Liberty City. Angell Epps is the daughter of a strict Pentecostal preacher who grows up seeing the world through the rose colored glasses of the church, until she meets Chance, a very handsome and mysterious stranger that threatens to turn her whole world upside down! But where is Rayqelle?

     

  10. Big Girls One Night with a Prince: Short Erotic Romance – Book 3 by Ulriche Kacey Padraige
    (, 2013-11-15, Kindle Edition)
    Big Girls One Night with a Prince: Short Erotic Romance.

     

  11. Tiberius – Rap’s Rainmaker (Things You Can’t Tell Mama) by D T Pollard
    (Book Express, 2013-11-18, Kindle Edition)
    T The Rainmaker is the hottest new rapper in hip hop and he is on the mind of every act in the business because they need to work on stepping up their game or get run over. Tiberius Jones burst onto the rap scene with his raw energy and lethal flow. Determined to be the realest rapper in the game he lives above a strip club that he owns in a second floor apartment. In his quest to be number one, T the Rainmaker pulls a stunt that angers one of the biggest names in rap music and leads to a deadly confrontation at an awards show that rocks the rap world to it core. While in the midst of his chaotic career a woman captures Tiberius’ interest, but can he conquer his own suspicions long enough to build a relationship? Tiberius Jones is hiding a surprise he will spring on the public that could either send him down a road of rap royalty or hip hop infamy.

     

  12. Moving To Jamaica: Hey Joe (Culture Shock Series) by Jerry Beller
    (Jamerica Publishing, 2013-11-09, Kindle Edition)
    River Adams is a hot shot congressional staffer, a major mover and shaker on the DC scene with a bright future ahead of him. Shocking his colleagues, friends and family, one day, without warning, he walks away from it all and boards a plane destined for Jamaica.Leaving the rat race behind, River moves to Jamaica. . .Now known as just another white Joe, River attempts to redefine himself and his life as he settles into his new home in Port Antonio far away from the power plays and politics of DC. As he works on his novel, a historical fiction about the Vietnam War era, River finds himself falling deeply in love with the wonders of Jamaica, from the colorful people he interacts with on a daily basis to the heart-stopping majesty and beauty to explore each and every day.River falls in love with nature, Jamaica and Jamaicans. . .As he sheds his old life and embraces the new, River’s natural curiosity and spontaneity becomes an unstoppable force. His philosophers mind combined with a desire to make a difference in the world will soon make his stay in Jamaica far richer than anything the average Joe will ever experience.

     

  13. Big ‘n’ Nothin’ by James Edward Allen
    (G. Meyer Books/Spiritual Traveler Press, 2013-11-10, Kindle Edition)
    “Big or nothin’” is the credo of Pepper Hotwell, a professional gangster who specializes in armed robbery. Set in the ghetto of Gary, Indiana and Chicago’s south side in the late 1960s, his story is a raw, desperate, gun-slinging roll-of-the-dice fueled by drugs, sex, ambition, and pure will to survive. As he swashbuckles his way through a series of high profile heists, he demonstrates his willingness to follow his credo to its ultimate conclusion in his quest for the big score.

     

  14. FeMALE TRAITS “The Trilogy” by Lurea C. McFadden
    (Bruce Publishing, 2013-11-10, Kindle Edition)
    - the story of sexy, smart and very married Grace Trufant and her playa lifestyle. She is married to a successful, loving husband but somehow she requires more attention than this fine upstanding man can offer. She plays hard; in fact she is a playa in her own right. But Grace forgets that Game recognizes Game when she runs into Sonia, her husband’s best friend. This is the tale of Grace’s extra-marital love affair, love and support of good friends, and lessons learned along the way.

     

  15. Profiling or Prejudice by Michael Jones
    (Createspace, 2013-11-14, Kindle Edition)
    Profiling or Prejudice is a funny fictional mini-novel based on a short period in the life of Tyrone Jenkins, a college graduate who experiences profiling, prejudice, and stereotyping enough to last him a life time while falling in love with a woman who has a specific agenda all of her own.

     

  16. The Pleasure of pain by Shameek Speight
    (True Glory Publications, 2013-11-15, Kindle Edition)
    In this twisted tale you will be introduced to Tess, Iris, Vanessa, Ebony and Bless who find out that The Pleasure of Pain is a true testament that we always want what we shouldn’t have. Tess is a strong determined business woman by the day and queen of the streets by night. She will stop at nothing to get the life she wants for herself and her three best friends along with her man, even if it means breaking old bonds and creating lifetime enemies. What she doesn’t realize is in the game of cut- throat there are no rules. Bless emerges on the scene after being recently released from prison only to find that things are not the way they were before he got locked up. The worst part is the person he has to fight is the person he least expected would betray him. He is out for blood and hell bent on destroying anyone who gets in his way. Iris is secretly in love with Tess, but plays the friend card in order to get closer to her. She knows that Tess is in love with another man, however that doesn’t stop her from plotting to get Tess’ heart. Vanessa and Ebony are sisters who share the same father and they happen to be Tess’ top lieutenants. Their loyalty and love run deep for Tess and has never been questioned until now… With pleasure there is always a little pain as Tess and her girlfriends will soon find out. Will they break under pressure or will they show why women rule the world?

     

  17. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson
    (Little, Brown and Company, 2013-11-05, Hardcover)
    It’s Christmas Eve and Detective Alex Cross has been called out to catch someone who’s robbing his church’s poor box. That mission behind him, Alex returns home to celebrate with Bree, Nana, and his children. The tree decorating is barely underway before his phone rings again–a horrific hostage situation is quickly spiraling out of control. Away from his own family on the most precious of days, Alex calls upon every ounce of his training, creativity, and daring to save another family. Alex risks everything–and he may not make it back alive on this most sacred of family days. Alex Cross is a hero for our time, and never more so than in this story of family, action, and the deepest moral choices. MERRY CHRISTMAS, ALEX CROSS will be a holiday classic for years to come.

     

  18. Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
    (Atria / 37 Ink, 2013-11-19, Hardcover)
    The story that inspired the major motion picture, with an introduction by the bestselling author of Wench, Dolen Perkins-Valdez, Twelve Years a Slave is a harrowing, vividly detailed, and utterly unforgettable account of slavery.Solomon Northup was an entrepreneur and dedicated family man, father to three young children, Elizabeth, Margaret, and Alonzo. What little free time he had after long days of manual and farm labor he spent reading books and playing the violin. Though his father was born into slavery, Solomon was born and lived free.In March 1841, two strangers approached Northup, offering him employment as a violinist in a town hundreds of miles away from his home in Saratoga Springs, New York. Solomon bid his wife farewell until his return. Only after he was drugged and bound did he realize the strangers were kidnappers—that nefarious brand of criminals in the business of capturing runaway and free blacks for profit. Thus began Northup’s horrific life as a slave.Dehumanized, beaten, and worked mercilessly, Northup suffered all the more, wondering what had become of his family. One owner was savagely cruel and Northup recalls he was “indebted to him for nothing, save undeserved abuse.” Just as he felt the summer of his life fade and all hope nearly lost, he met a kindhearted stranger who changed the course of his life.With its firsthand account of this country’s Peculiar Institution, this is a book no one interested in American history can afford to miss.

     

  19. White Girls by Hilton Als
    (McSweeney’s, 2013-11-12, Hardcover)
    White Girls, Hilton Als’s first book since The Women fourteen years ago, finds one of The New Yorker’s boldest cultural critics deftly weaving together his brilliant analyses of literature, art, and music with fearless insights on race, gender, and history. The result is an extraordinary, complex portrait of “white girls,” as Als dubs them—an expansive but precise category that encompasses figures as diverse as Truman Capote and Louise Brooks, Malcolm X and Flannery O’Connor. In pieces that hairpin between critique and meditation, fiction and nonfiction, high culture and low, the theoretical and the deeply personal, Als presents a stunning portrait of a writer by way of his subjects, and an invaluable guide to the culture of our time.

     

  20. Animal 2: The Omen by K’wan
    (Cash Money Content, 2013-11-19, Paperback)
    Secrets are revealed, sides are chosen and bodies are dropped…it’s on! After being thought dead, Animal resurfaces on the streets of New York to keep true to his promise, and make it rain blood over Harlem. All those who had wronged him would feel his wrath, including Shai Clark, boss of the New York underworld. However, touching a man like Shai Clark proves to be easier said than done. Using Animal’s soul mate Gu­cci as bait, Shai sets a trap for the young killer. Once again Animal finds himself captured, but this time there would be no trial. He is sentenced to die at the hands of Shai’s executioner, a man known only as Priest. The assassin is ordered to kill Animal, but instead of death he gives him the truth of his shadowed past and how their des­tinies are intertwined. The man ordered to take Animal from the world is also the man who brought him into it. Animal finds himself torn between his hatred for the father who had abandoned him and the man who had taken everything from him. An uneasy truce is formed between father and son to take down a common enemy and finally grant Animal his freedom from the blood debt he’s carried for so many years, but when the ghosts of Animal’s past catch up with him he learns that nothing is what it seems, and everything is subject to corruption, even his love for Gucci.

     

September’s Bestselling African American Books

Here’s a list of September 2013′s bestselling African American books from Amazon.com.

  1. Who Asked You? by Terry McMillan
    (Viking Adult, 2013-09-17, Hardcover)
    In her eighth novel, McMillan gives exuberant voice to characters who reveal how we live now – at least as lived in a racially diverse Los Angeles neighborhood. Kaleidoscopic, fast-paced, and filled with McMillan’s inimitable humor, Who Asked You? opens as Trinetta leaves her two young sons with her mother, Betty Jean, and promptly disappears. BJ, a trademark McMillan heroine, already has her hands full dealing with her other adult children, two opinionated sisters, an ill husband, and her own postponed dreams—all while holding down a job delivering room service at a hotel. Her son Dexter is about to be paroled from prison; Quentin, the family success, can’t be bothered to lend a hand; and taking care of two lively grandsons is the last thing BJ thinks she needs. The drama unfolds through the perspectives of a rotating cast of characters, pitch-perfect, each playing a part, and full of surprises. Who Asked You? casts an intimate look at the burdens and blessings of family and speaks to trusting your own judgment even when others don’t agree. McMillan’s signature voice and unforgettable characters bring universal issues to brilliant, vivid life.

     

  2. murderville 3: the black dahlia by ashley & jaquavis
    (cash money content, 2013-09-03, paperback)
    In this final installment of the murderville saga, ashley and jaquavis bring you the grit, treachery, and street perspective that they have become legendary for. This thrilling page-turner introduces the story of the black dahl­ia and her bloodstained ascent to power. After establishing a con­nection with “the five families,” dahlia becomes literally untouch­able. Her brazen tactics and mafia-style antics become infamous as she is set to take over the country’s black market. But there is only one thing still standing in her way – she is a woman. The competi­tion doesn’t respect her so dahlia sets out on a bloody mission to ensure the protection of her new kingdom. Liberty has relocated to her hometown only to get a knock on the door by a man she hasn’t seen in years. She reacquaints herself with the past and gets connected with some of the biggest bosses in the country. When fate brings her face-to-face with dahlia, who will end up victorious? Will dahlia’s newfound power make her invinci­ble? Or, will liberty finally get the revenge she deserves? What hap­pens next is the most shocking ending that ashley & jaquavis have ever created. This is storytelling at its greatest.

     

  3. Destiny’s Surrender by Beverly Jenkins
    (Avon, 2013-09-24, Mass Market Paperback)

     

  4. The Wedding Gift by Marlen Suyapa Bodden
    (St. Martin’s Press, 2013-09-24, Hardcover)
    When prestigious plantation owner Cornelius Allen gives his daughter Clarissa’s hand in marriage, she takes with her a gift: Sarah—her slave and her half-sister.  Raised by an educated mother, Clarissa is not a proper southern belle she appears to be with ambitions of loving who she chooses and Sarah equally hides behind the façade of being a docile house slave as she plots to escape. Both women bring these tumultuous secrets and desires with them to their new home, igniting events that spiral into a tale beyond what you ever imagined possible and it will leave you enraptured until the very end. Told through alternating viewpoints of Sarah and Theodora Allen, Cornelius’ wife, Marlen Suyapa Bodden’s The Wedding Gift is an intimate portrait that will leave readers breathless.

     

  5. Seven for a Secret by Lyndsay Faye
    (Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam, 2013-09-17, Hardcover)
    From Edgar-nominated author Lyndsay Faye comes the next book in what Gillian Flynn calls “a brilliant new mystery series.” Six months after the formation of the NYPD, its most reluctant and talented officer, Timothy Wilde, thinks himself well versed in his city’s dark practices—until he learns of the gruesome underworld of lies and corruption ruled by the “blackbirders,” who snatch free Northerners of color from their homes, masquerade them as slaves, and sell them South to toil as plantation property. The abolitionist Timothy is horrified by these traders in human flesh. But in 1846, slave catching isn’t just legal, it’s law enforcement. When the beautiful and terrified Lucy Adams staggers into Timothy’s office to report a robbery and is asked what was stolen, her reply is, “My family.” Their search for her mixed-race sister and son will plunge Timothy and his feral brother, Valentine, into a world where police are complicit and politics savage, and corpses appear in the most shocking of places. Timothy finds himself caught between power and principles, desperate to protect his only brother and to unravel the puzzle before all he cares for is lost.

     

  6. The Speech: The Story Behind Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream by Gary Younge
    (Haymarket Books, 2013-09-10, Hardcover)
    MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DELIVERED his powerful “I Have a Dream” speech on August 28, 1963. Fifty years later, the speech endures as a defining moment in the civil rights movement. It continues to be heralded as a beacon in the ongoing struggle for racial equality.This gripping book is rooted in new and important interviews with Clarence Jones, a close friend of and draft speechwriter for Martin Luther King Jr., and Joan Baez, a singer at the march, as well as Angela Davis and other leading civil rights leaders. It brings to life the fascinating chronicle behind “The Speech” and other events surrounding the March on Washington. Younge skillfully captures the spirit of that historic day in Washington and offers a new generation of readers a critical modern analysis of why “I Have a Dream” remains America’s favorite speech._________”It was over eighty degrees when Martin Luther King Jr. took the stage at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963. King was the last speaker. By the time he reached the podium, many in the crowd had started to leave. Not all those who remained could hear him properly, but those who could stood rapt. ‘Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed,’ said King as though he were wrapping up. ‘Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.’ Then he set his prepared text aside. [Clarence] Jones saw his stance turn from lecturer to preacher. He turned to the person next to him: ‘Those people don’t know it but they’re about to go to church.’ A smattering of applause filled a pause more pregnant than most. ‘So even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream.’”—from the introduction

     

  7. The Boxcar Children Beginning: The Aldens of Fair Meadow Farm (The Boxcar Children Mysteries) by Patricia MacLachlan
    (Albert Whitman & Company, 2013-09-01, Paperback)
    Before they were the Boxcar Children, Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny Alden lived with their parents at Fair Meadow Farm. Newbery-Award winning author Patricia MacLachlan pays loving tribute to the classic novel by Gertrude Chandler Warner in this story of the Alden children’s origins and the challenges they faced before their boxcar adventures.

     

  8. For Discrimination: Race, Affirmative Action, and the Law by Randall Kennedy
    (Pantheon, 2013-09-03, Hardcover)
    In the wake of the Supreme Court’s recent decision regarding Fisher v. University of Texas, For Discrimination is at once the definitive reckoning with one of America’s most explosively contentious and divisive issues and a principled work of advocacy for clearly defined justice.  What precisely is affirmative action, and why is it fiercely championed by some and just as fiercely denounced by others? Does it signify a boon or a stigma? Or is it simply reverse discrimination? What are its benefits and costs to American society? What are the exact indicia determining who should or should not be accorded affirmative action? When should affirmative action end, if it must? Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School professor and author of such critically acclaimed and provocative books as Race, Crime, and the Law and the national best-seller Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word, gives us a concise, gimlet-eyed, and deeply personal conspectus of the policy, refusing to shy away from the myriad complexities of an issue that continues to bedevil American race relations. With pellucid reasoning, Kennedy accounts for the slipperiness of the term “affirmative action” as it has been appropriated by ideologues of every stripe; delves into the complex and surprising legal history of the policy; coolly analyzes key arguments pro and con advanced by the left and right, including the so-called color-blind, race-neutral challenge; critiques the impact of Supreme Court decisions on higher education; and ponders the future of affirmative action.

     

  9. The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832 by Alan Taylor
    (W. W. Norton & Company, 2013-09-09, Hardcover)
    This searing story of slavery and freedom in the Chesapeake by a Pulitzer Prize–winning historian reveals the pivot in the nation’s path between the founding and civil war.Frederick Douglass recalled that slaves living along Chesapeake Bay longingly viewed sailing ships as “freedom’s swift-winged angels.” In 1813 those angels appeared in the bay as British warships coming to punish the Americans for declaring war on the empire. Over many nights, hundreds of slaves paddled out to the warships seeking protection for their families from the ravages of slavery. The runaways pressured the British admirals into becoming liberators. As guides, pilots, sailors, and marines, the former slaves used their intimate knowledge of the countryside to transform the war. They enabled the British to escalate their onshore attacks and to capture and burn Washington, D.C. Tidewater masters had long dreaded their slaves as “an internal enemy.” By mobilizing that enemy, the war ignited the deepest fears of Chesapeake slaveholders. It also alienated Virginians from a national government that had neglected their defense. Instead they turned south, their interests aligning more and more with their section. In 1820 Thomas Jefferson observed of sectionalism: “Like a firebell in the night [it] awakened and filled me with terror. I considered it at once the knell of the union.” The notes of alarm in Jefferson’s comment speak of the fear aroused by the recent crisis over slavery in his home state. His vision of a cataclysm to come proved prescient. Jefferson’s startling observation registered a turn in the nation’s course, a pivot from the national purpose of the founding toward the threat of disunion. Drawn from new sources, Alan Taylor’s riveting narrative re-creates the events that inspired black Virginians, haunted slaveholders, and set the nation on a new and dangerous course. 35 illustrations; 4 maps

     

  10. Mafia Princess Part 4 (Stay Rich Or Die Trying) by Joy Deja King
    (A King Production, 2013-09-25, Paperback)
    Semaj is back as the head of the Espreilla Family but she soon learns someone has masterminded a plan to make her relinquish her power. With enemies closing in and death knocking at her door, Semaj believes there is only one man she can completely trust and let her guard down with, the love of her life Qua. But is Qua willing to put the past behind them and do whatever is necessary to protect Semaj? With so much to lose Semaj is determined to Stay Rich Or Die Trying.

     

  11. The Cutting Season: A Novel by Attica Locke
    (Harper Perennial, 2013-09-17, Paperback)
    “The Cutting Season is a rare murder mystery with heft, a historical novel that thrills, a page-turner that makes you think. Attica Locke is a dazzling writer with a conscience.”—Dolen Perkins-Valdez, New York Times bestselling author of WenchAttica Locke’s breathtaking debut novel, Black Water Rising, won resounding acclaim from major publications coast-to-coast and from respected crime fiction masters like James Ellroy and George Pelecanos, earning this exciting new author comparisons to Dennis Lehane, Scott Turow, and Walter Mosley. Locke returns with The Cutting Season, a second novel easily as gripping and powerful as her first—a heart-pounding thriller that interweaves two murder mysteries, one on Belle Vie, a historic landmark in the middle of Lousiana’s Sugar Cane country, and one involving a slave gone missing more than one hundred years earlier. Black Water Rising was nominated for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize, an Edgar® Award, and an NAACP Image Award, and was short-listed for the Orange Prize in the U.K. The Cutting Season has been selected by bestselling author Dennis Lehane as the first pick for his new line of books at HarperCollins.

     

  12. Warrior Princess: My Quest to Become the First Female Maasai Warrior by Mindy Budgor
    (skirt!, 2013-09-10, Hardcover)
    The amazing true adventure story of a young woman who— at 27 years old and undecided as to what to do with her future—takes a spontaneous trip that leads to becoming the first female Maasai warrior and an official member of the tribe.

     

  13. Men We Reaped: A Memoir by Jesmyn Ward
    (Bloomsbury USA, 2013-09-17, Hardcover)
    “We saw the lightning and that was the guns; and then we heard the thunder and that was the big guns; and then we heard the rain falling and that was the blood falling; and when we came to get in the crops, it was dead men that we reaped.” —Harriet TubmanIn five years, Jesmyn Ward lost five young men in her life—to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that can follow people who live in poverty, particularly black men. Dealing with these losses, one after another, made Jesmyn ask the question: Why? And as she began to write about the experience of living through all the dying, she realized the truth—and it took her breath away. Her brother and her friends all died because of who they were and where they were from, because they lived with a history of racism and economic struggle that fostered drug addiction and the dissolution of family and relationships. Jesmyn says the answer was so obvious she felt stupid for not seeing it. But it nagged at her until she knew she had to write about her community, to write their stories and her own. Jesmyn grew up in poverty in rural Mississippi. She writes powerfully about the pressures this brings, on the men who can do no right and the women who stand in for family in a society where the men are often absent. She bravely tells her story, revisiting the agonizing losses of her only brother and her friends. As the sole member of her family to leave home and pursue higher education, she writes about this parallel American universe with the objectivity distance provides and the intimacy of utter familiarity. A brutal world rendered beautifully, Jesmyn Ward’s memoir will sit comfortably alongside Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, Tobias Wolff’s This Boy’s Life, and Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

     

  14. Invasion by Walter Dean Myers
    (Scholastic Press, 2013-09-24, Hardcover)
    Walter Dean Myers brilliantly renders the realities of World War II.Josiah Wedgewood and Marcus Perry are on their way to an uncertain future. Their whole lives are ahead of them, yet at the same time, death’s whisper is everywhere. One white, one black, these young men have nothing in common and everything in common as they approach an experience that will change them forever.It’s May 1944. World War II is ramping up, and so are these young recruits, ready and eager. In small towns and big cities all over the globe, people are filled with fear. When Josiah and Marcus come together in what will be the greatest test of their lives, they learn hard lessons about race, friendship, and what it really means to fight. Set on the front lines of the Normandy invasion, this novel, rendered with heart-in-the-throat precision, is a cinematic masterpiece. Here we see the bold terror of war, and also the nuanced havoc that affects a young person’s psyche while living in a barrack, not knowing if today he will end up dead or alive.

     

  15. Kara Walker: Dust Jackets for the Niggerati by Hilton Als
    (Gregory R. Miller & Co., 2013-09-30, Hardcover)
    African-American artist Kara Walker (born 1969) has been acclaimed internationally for her candid investigations of race, sexuality and violence through the lens of reconceived historical tropes. She had her first solo show at The Drawing Center in New York City in 1994 and, at the age of 28 in 1997, was one of the youngest people to receive a MacArthur Fellowship. This publication documents Dust Jackets for the Niggerati–and Supporting Dissertations, Drawings Submitted Ruefully by Dr. Kara E. Walker, a major series of graphite drawings and hand-printed texts on paper that grew out of Walker’s attempts to understand how interpersonal and geopolitical powers are asserted through the lives of individuals. In scenes that range from the grotesque to the humorous to the tragic, these works vividly and powerfully explore the themes of transition and migration that run through the African-American experience. The accompanying essays take us through Walker’s saga of American experience–the dual streams of renewal and destruction that trace parallel lines through the last century’s rapid urbanization and the complementary emergence of a “New Negro” identity. Fully illustrated with reproductions of the entire series, and designed by award-winning design studio CoMa with Walker’s close collaboration, Dust Jackets for the Niggerati represents a major contribution to the career of one of our most significant and complex contemporary artists.

     

  16. Primary Lessons by Sarah Bracey White
    (Cavankerry, 2013-09-03, Paperback)
    Ripped from middle-class life in Philadelphia, and transplanted to a single-parent household in the segregated south, Sarah, a precocious black child struggles to be the master of her fate. She refuses to accept the segregation that tries to confine herÑa system her mother accepts as the southern way of life. A brave memoir that testifies to the author’s fiery spirit and sense of self that sustained her through family, social and cultural upheavals.

     

  17. Trinity Falls (A Finding Home Novel) by Regina Hart
    (Kensington Books, 2013-09-03, Kindle Edition)
    “Rich and satisfying.” –LuAnn McLane, author of Whisper’s EdgeEan Fever is burned out by the hectic pace of New York City and his cutthroat law career. Longing for a sense of community, he’s returned to his hometown of Trinity Falls, Ohio. Maybe he can even help save the Town Center from greedy developers looking to destroy its small businesses—like Books & Bakery, owned by Megan McCloud. Megan was once an awkward girl next door, but Ean discovers she’s grown into a strong-willed, beautiful woman… Megan isn’t the only strong-willed McCloud. Her cousin, Ramona, is the town mayor. And as usual, Ramona is trying to take away what Megan wants most. As teenagers, that meant Ean. Now Ramona wants to take away her business. But Megan has learned how to fight. And she soon realizes that Ean is ready to fight with her—and for her. Because when Ean finds himself falling for the woman who’s adored him all along, he’ll have to convince her that he’s not leaving again. At least not without her. Praise for Regina Hart’s Keeping Score“The writing is clever and funny.” –RT Book Reviews “Hart raises issues such as love, trust, commitment, family, work, marriage and dreams.” –APOOO Book Club

     

  18. Last Chance for Justice: How Relentless Investigators Uncovered New Evidence Convicting the Birmingham Church Bombers by T. K. Thorne
    (Chicago Review Press, 2013-09-01, Hardcover)
    On the morning of September 15, 1963, a bomb exploded outside the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four young girls. Thirty-two years later, stymied by a code of silence and an imperfect and often racist legal system, only one person, Robert “Dynamite Bob” Chambliss, had been convicted in the murders, though a wider conspiracy was suspected. With many key witnesses and two suspects already dead, there seemed little hope of bringing anyone else to justice.            But in 1995 the FBI and local law enforcement reopened the investigation in secret, led by detective Ben Herren of the Birmingham Police Department and special agent Bill Fleming of the FBI. For over a year, Herren and Fleming analyzed the original FBI files on the bombing and activities of the Ku Klux Klan, then began a search for new evidence. Their first interview—with Klansman Bobby Frank Cherry—broke open the case, but not in the way they expected.            Told by a longtime officer of the Birmingham Police Department, Last Chance for Justice is the inside story of one of the most infamous crimes of the civil rights era. T. K. Thorne follows the ups and downs of the investigation, detailing how Herren and Fleming identified new witnesses and unearthed lost evidence. With tenacity, humor, dedication, and some luck, the pair encountered the worst and best in human nature on their journey to find justice, and perhaps closure, for the citizens of Birmingham.

     

  19. Most Wanted by Kiki Swinson
    (Dafina, 2013-09-24, Paperback)

     

  20. Black Yellowdogs: The Most Dangerous Citizen Is Not Armed, But Uninformed by Ben Kinchlow
    (WND Books, 2013-09-10, Kindle Edition)
    It has often been said, “What you don’t know won’t hurt you.” Not true. Ignorance is deadly. Have you ever heard of the phrase forty acres and a mule? Do you know how slavery actually began in America? Did you know the KKK lynched over a thousand white people? Do you know why? Have you ever wondered, “What do African Americans want?” Why they vote Democrat? Did you know that most Blacks DO NOT support Affirmative Action? Who speaks for African-Americans? Does Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, and others, really speak for Black America? Who elected these “civil rights leaders?” If you have ever considered, even briefly, any one of these questions, or others, in the area of race relations, then you need your own copy of Black YellowDogs. (What does “black yellowdogs” mean, anyway?) Buy it, read it, mark it up, look up the facts, burn it, or better yet give it to one of your white or black friends and talk about it. Remember, the most dangerous citizen is not armed but uninformed.

     

2013′s Bestselling African American Books

Here’s a list of 2013′s bestselling African American books from Amazon.com as of May 2013.

  1. Irresistible Forces (Harlequin Kimani Romance) by Brenda Jackson
    (Harlequin Kimani Romance, 2013-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    An offer he couldn’t refuse…One week of mind-blowing sex on a beautiful Caribbean island. Of all the business proposals financial tycoon Dominic Saxon has heard, Taylor Steele’s is definitely the most tempting. All Taylor wants in return is for Dominic to father her baby. No strings, no commitments…just a mutually satisfying arrangement. Make that very satisfying. For a man with no intention of marrying again, it sounds ideal.Taylor wants a baby, not a relationship. And sexy, intelligent Dominic seems like a man with perfect genes. Turns out, Dominic has perfect everything. Their “procreation vacation” is a whirlwind of sensual ecstasy. But when it’s over, will either of them be able to say goodbye?

     

  2. The Mogul’s Reluctant Bride – Book Two (Billionaire Brides of Granite Falls) by Ana E Ross
    (Ana E Ross, 2013-05-11, Kindle Edition)
    Book Two: There’s only so much rejection a heart can take…Following the deaths of her sister and brother-in-law, Kaya Brehna is awarded custody of their three children. To avoid financial ruin, she must move them to Palm Beach where her successful career in interior decorating can provide financial security. Her plans are, however, thwarted by New Hampshire business mogul, Bryce Fontaine, who is determined to keep his godchildren in Granite Falls at all costs—even emotional blackmail.Ever since he lost his own family five years earlier, Bryce Fontaine has been a tormented soul. His godchildren are the closest thing to family he has, and he’ll be damned before he let some corporate ladder-climbing stranger take them away from him.When a second will surfaces that changes both their plans, to keep the children’s world intact, Bryce and Kaya enter a loveless marriage of convenience that, nonetheless, sizzles with unrelenting passion. Does Kaya have the power to free Bryce’s heart from the nightmares and demons of his past, or will his fears cause him to lose the family he’s grown to love so dearly?

     

  3. Don’t Rescue Me, God’s Molding Me (Snow Series: Meet Savannah PART 2) by Marita Kinney
    (Pure Thoughts Publishing, LLC, 2013-05-15, Kindle Edition)
    Savannah is a sophisticated single mother who has had her share of growing pains. From rags to riches, back to rags, Savannah is determined to change her circumstance through her faith and perseverance. As she struggles to keep her head above water, her new vindictive neighbors, try her patience and her faith. She desperately desires for God to rescue her from her new life of struggle.

     

  4. The Diary of Nancy Grace ( Short story Series ) by Starlette Summers
    (True Glory Publications, 2013-05-02, Kindle Edition)
    Nancy Grace is a little girl screaming for help and searching for her mother’s love. Emotionally, physically and sexually abused by the hands of her own mother, revenge is looking bitter sweet as Nancy faces her own inner demons, one being her best friend.

     

  5. Rent-A-Bride by Elaine Overton
    (Painted Dreams Publishing, 2013-04-25, Kindle Edition)
    There is nothing Edward Bouchard would not do for his beloved grandfather. ABSOLUTELY NOTHING. Including, making a deathbed promise to the old man that not only is he finally in love – the one thing Stanley Bouchard has most desired for his workaholic grandchild – but that he asked this love of his life to marry him and she said yes! Ed’s only intention being to give his grandfather peace in his final moments. But as fate would have it the announcement not only gives Stanley peace, it gives him strength and determination to hang on to life long enough to meet his new granddaughter-in-law and witness the ceremony for himself. This is fine by Ed, who counts every moment with his grandfather as a precious gift. He just has one small problem . . . where the hell is he going to find a bride on such short notice?

     

  6. The Snow’s Meltdown (Snow Series: Meet the Snow’s PART 1) by Marita Kinney
    (Pure Thoughts Publishing, LLC, 2013-01-15, Kindle Edition)
     Ihad a blast writing this book as part of NaNoWriMo(National November Novel Month). For anyone who’s ever wondered about NaNoWriMo,it is a free flow of words resulting in an extremely raw uncut rough draftfiction novel. Therefore, this book was written in a month. This was my firsttime participating, and I’ll probably do it again.  Now allow me to introduce to you, Calvin Snow.  Calvin Snow is the only child of Pastor and First Lady Snow and their family is very influential within their community. Calvin has everything that he could possible want, but soon realizes that giving his wife Katrina the child that she so desperately wants would be harder than he ever imagine. Pastor and Lady Snow try to be there for them, but struggle with their own problems and martial secrets. Lady Snow starts to see her family crumble before her own eyes and tries to hold everyone together, but the truth hurts. Will this family be able to handle their own “Meltdown?”

     

  7. A House Divided (A Reverend Curtis Black Novel) by Kimberla Lawson Roby
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2013-05-07, Kindle Edition)
    A HOUSE DIVIDEDLife is close to perfect for the Reverend Curtis Black and his wife, Charlotte–except their son Matthew and his girlfriend, Racquel, are about to become parents at the tender age of eighteen. Even though Curtis and Charlotte wish Matthew could focus on Harvard instead of fatherhood, they are determined to welcome their new grandson with open arms. But for Charlotte, welcoming her future in-laws is another story. Try as she might, Charlotte can’t stand Racquel’s mother, Vanessa–and the feeling appears to be mutual.When the tension between Charlotte and Vanessa finally erupts, the stress sends an already-fragile Racquel into early labor. Everyone is quick to blame Charlotte, including Matthew and Curtis. That her own husband would side with someone else infuriates Charlotte and strains the relationship they’ve only recently been able to repair. Her one ally is Racquel’s father, but that brings problems of its own.While Charlotte schemes against Vanessa, Curtis is consumed with his own concerns about Deliverance Outreach. A mysterious figure from his past has been sending Curtis cryptic messages threatening to take away Curtis’s coveted position as senior pastor and destroy everything he has worked so hard for. But who could hate Curtis that much? And how can he fight an enemy he can’t even name?Times of trouble are descending upon the Black family in more ways than one. Will they be able to overcome their challenges and stand together against someone who could take it all away? Or is the Black family finally out of miracles?

     

  8. Gangstress by India
    (SBR Publications, 2013-04-15, Kindle Edition)
    Janelle Doesher never wanted to be a hustler’s bitch. She wanted to be a bitch that hustled, bottom line! She watched in awe as her father became notorious on the vicious streets of Detroit and silently waited for a shot under his umbrella. After tragedy strikes her family, Janelle is black-balled to the bottom. However, she’s determined to re-gain control of the streets and take possession of the throne. The underworld ain’t never seen a female boss like her. Hold on tight, as you are about to embark on a ride unlike none other! The breathtaking tale of the one and only Jane Doe is sure to leave you speechless.

     

  9. Mom & Me & Mom by Maya Angelou
    (Random House, 2013-04-02, Hardcover)
    The story of Maya Angelou’s extraordinary life has been chronicled in her multiple bestselling autobiographies. But now, at last, the legendary author shares the deepest personal story of her life: her relationship with her mother.   For the first time, Angelou reveals the triumphs and struggles of being the daughter of Vivian Baxter, an indomitable spirit whose petite size belied her larger-than-life presence—a presence absent during much of Angelou’s early life. When her marriage began to crumble, Vivian famously sent three-year-old Maya and her older brother away from their California home to live with their grandmother in Stamps, Arkansas. The subsequent feelings of abandonment stayed with Angelou for years, but their reunion, a decade later, began a story that has never before been told. In Mom & Me & Mom, Angelou dramatizes her years reconciling with the mother she preferred to simply call “Lady,” revealing the profound moments that shifted the balance of love and respect between them.   Delving into one of her life’s most rich, rewarding, and fraught relationships, Mom & Me & Mom explores the healing and love that evolved between the two women over the course of their lives, the love that fostered Maya Angelou’s rise from immeasurable depths to reach impossible heights.

     

  10. Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
    (Knopf, 2013-05-14, Kindle Edition)
    From the award-winning author of Half of a Yellow Sun, a dazzling new novel: a story of love and race centered around a young man and woman from Nigeria who face difficult choices and challenges in the countries they come to call home. As teenagers in a Lagos secondary school, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are leaving the country if they can. Ifemelu—beautiful, self-assured—departs for America to study. She suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships and friendships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze—the quiet, thoughtful son of a professor—had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a writer of an eye-opening blog about race in America. But when Ifemelu returns to Nigeria, and she and Obinze reignite their shared passion—for their homeland and for each other—they will face the toughest decisions of their lives. Fearless, gripping, at once darkly funny and tender, spanning three continents and numerous lives, Americanah is a richly told story set in today’s globalized world: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s most powerful and astonishing novel yet.

     

  11. Double Dare (A Modern Fairy Tale) by Melissa Blue
    (Confessions of a Romance Author, 2013-03-28, Kindle Edition)
    First impressions are lasting impressions…Pastry baker Emmaline Sharp is one business connection away from turning her bakery into something more than the dessert shop on the corner. She believes she’s found Mr. Right in café owner Tobias Merchant. His Caff-aholic brand of freshly brewed coffee makes him the perfect partner. When she accepts a dare that thrusts her naked self into Tobias’ waiting arms, she jeopardizes her entire future. Emma will have to convince him to give her another chance, and somehow she’ll just have to ignore the unexpected passion he ignites within her.Tobias needs the connection with Emma’s bakery, Sweet Tooth, in order to liberate himself from the financial and emotional obligations of his past. Unfortunately, Emma’s reckless behavior leaves him doubting she can be level-headed and business savvy. Every one of his instincts tells him to walk away, but she’s a temptation he can’t seem to deny. He’s inexplicably drawn to the lightness in her, especially when he knows just how dark the world can be. Against his better judgment, Tobias ignores his instincts and proceeds to form a partnership with Emma.When their relationship shifts from business to personal, will Emma and Tobias be able to conquer their demons and find their sweet reward before the deal turns sour?

     

  12. Fatal Deception by S.R. Burks
    (Nocturna Press, 2013-04-15, Kindle Edition)
    Marc Caldwell has raised his daughter on a country ranch with the help of his brother and sister-in-law. Retired young, he has devoted his life to his daughter, but she will soon leave for college. His brother thinks he should make plans for the future, but suddenly more serious concerns befall the family. Two new women have entered Marc’s life: a blue-eyed, short-tempered journalist, and a beautiful new neighbor with soft mocha skin and delicate features that mimic those of his beloved late wife. Both women have secrets… but one is out for murder.Revised Kindle EditionSuspense, Romance, Country living, Multi-racial, Interracial

     

  13. Don’t Rescue Me, God’s Molding Me (Snow Series: Meet Savannah PART 2) by Marita Kinney
    (Pure Thoughts Publishing, LLC, 2013-05-15, Kindle Edition)
    Savannah is a sophisticated single mother who has had her share of growing pains. From rags to riches, back to rags, Savannah is determined to change her circumstance through her faith and perseverance. As she struggles to keep her head above water, her new vindictive neighbors, try her patience and her faith. She desperately desires for God to rescue her from her new life of struggle.

     

  14. MOB BOSS 6: THE HEART OF RENO GABRINI (Mob Boss Series) by Mallory Monroe
    (Austin Brook Publishing, 2013-05-07, Kindle Edition)
    Reno Gabrini believes his number one job is to protect his family. His beautiful wife, Trina, and their two sons are the very reason he gets out of bed every morning. But when he returns home from a business trip to find his wife partnering with people he barely knows, a gold digging female attempting to worm her way into the family, and a lovesick son with a dead body in his trunk, he knows his job has gotten that much harder. He takes charge, believing there’s more going on than meets the eye, but his family insists he’s overreacting and is being, as usual, overly protective of them. Until the lid blows off of their idyllic life and plunges all of them into a world of passion and obsession where Reno begins to believe that all of their unsolicited drama may be disguising another mob war.In the sixth installment of the Mob Boss series, Reno Gabrini comes face to face with his greatest fears and is forced to put it all on the line in ways that nearly costs him everything.THE BESTSELLING MOB BOSS SERIES IN ORDER:ROMANCING THE MOB BOSSMOB BOSS 2: THE HEART OF THE MATTERMOB BOSS 3: LOVE AND RETRIBUTIONMOB BOSS 4: ROMANCING TRINA GABRINIA MOB BOSS CHRISTMAS: THE PREGNANCY

     

  15. Make Me Nut by Michael Vance
    (, 2013-02-12, Kindle Edition)
    What makes you moan? What makes you hot? What make you shiver? What makes you nut?If you’ve ever tingled between your thighs or started to moisten down below. If you’ve ever longed to be taken there and bask within the afterglow. If you’ve ever wanted or felt the need, for complete and total orgasmic release. If you’ve ever strived to reach your peak, climaxed hard and then found peace. We bring to you erotic tales, told within these six short stories. Which center around the woman cumming in all its beauty and its glories.

     

  16. A Deeper Love Inside: The Porsche Santiaga Story by Sister Souljah
    (Atria/Emily Bestler Books, 2013-01-29, Kindle Edition)
    THE SEQUEL MILLIONS OF READERS HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR . . . At last, mega-bestselling author Sister Souljah delivers the stunning sequel to The Coldest Winter Ever. Fierce, raw, and filled with adventure and emotional intensity, A Deeper Love Inside is an unforgettable coming-of-age story in the words of Porsche Santiaga, Winter’s younger sister. Sharp-tongued, quick-witted Porsche worships her sister Winter. Cut from the same cloth as her father, Ricky Santiaga, Porsche is also a natural-born hustler. Passionate and loyal to the extreme, she refuses to accept her new life in group homes, foster care, and juvenile detention after her family is torn apart. Porsche—unique, young, and beautiful—cries as much as she fights and uses whatever she has to reclaim her status. Unselfish, she pushes to get back everything that ever belonged to her wealthy, loving family. In A Deeper Love Inside, readers will encounter their favorite characters from The Coldest Winter Ever, including Winter and Midnight. Sister Souljah’s soulful writing will again move your heart and open your eyes to a shocking reality.

     

  17. Chocolate Brown by Coco Mixon
    (True Glory Publications, 2013-03-14, Kindle Edition)
    Chocolate loved her life as an only child, she never imagined having siblings. Growing up with the perfect parents was a plus. As lies and betrayals are revealed she learns life is not always sweet. Join Chocolate and her best friend Charmaine as they stumble upon the Brown’s family secrets.

     

  18. Hood Misfits by Storm
    (Sankofa Publications, 2013-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    Sixteen year old, Diamond “Ray-Ray” Jenkins had it made in the shade until one wrong move by her parents turned their lives upside down. They stole a shipment of drugs and money from the wrong street king, Damien Orlando. Now, with both her parents dead, killed in front of her, she’s inherited their debt and Damien is going to make sure she pays dearly.Seventeen year old Trigga has been a killer since he witnessed the murder of his parents and rape of his mother. Running from child protective services, he managed to get recruited to Damien’s team and worked his way through the ranks. Now, he’s Damien’s right hand man with a killer instinct and itchy trigger finger. E.N.G.A. Every Nigga Gotta Agenda.When Ray-Ray is snatched from the comfort of her old life and thrown into the abyss of the underworld she has to learn that sometimes you have to survive today so that you can live tomorrow.  Part One of the E.N.G.A Series.

     

April 2013′s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the upcoming bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. Face Off (The Baddest Chick) Part 4 by Nisa Santiago
    (Melodrama Publishing, 2013-04-02, Paperback)
    Clash of the Twins The relentless rivals Apple and Kola are back in business, and it’s about to get real. With her traumatic experiences in Mexico over, Apple is back to being the baddest. Now she’s determined to make her tormentors pay for the torture she endured, and no one is prepared for the terrifying takedown she’s planning for those she once loved. Kola is dominating the streets of Miami, but the haters and South Beach cartels are itching to see her leave, dead or alive. When she finds betrayal in an unlikely place, she’s motivated to come out on top and put Miami on notice. Apple and Kola rage fiery warfare against the enemies determined to bring them down. But now, both contenders stronger than ever, will have to Face Off once and for all.

     

  2. Mom & Me & Mom by Maya Angelou
    (Random House, 2013-04-02, Hardcover)
    The story of Maya Angelou’s extraordinary life has been chronicled in her multiple bestselling autobiographies. But now, at last, the legendary author shares the deepest personal story of her life: her relationship with her mother.   For the first time, Angelou reveals the triumphs and struggles of being the daughter of Vivian Baxter, an indomitable spirit whose petite size belied her larger-than-life presence—a presence absent during much of Angelou’s early life. When her marriage began to crumble, Vivian famously sent three-year-old Maya and her older brother away from their California home to live with their grandmother in Stamps, Arkansas. The subsequent feelings of abandonment stayed with Angelou for years, but their reunion, a decade later, began a story that has never before been told. In Mom & Me & Mom, Angelou dramatizes her years reconciling with the mother she preferred to simply call “Lady,” revealing the profound moments that shifted the balance of love and respect between them.   Delving into one of her life’s most rich, rewarding, and fraught relationships, Mom & Me & Mom explores the healing and love that evolved between the two women over the course of their lives, the love that fostered Maya Angelou’s rise from immeasurable depths to reach impossible heights.

     

  3. Stepping Stone (Crosstown to Oblivion) by Walter Mosley
    (Tor Books, 2013-04-02, Kindle Edition)
    Stepping Stone is but one of six fragments in the Crosstown to Oblivion short novels in which Mosley entertainingly explores life’s cosmic questions. From life’s meaning to the nature of good and evil, these tales take us on speculative journeys beyond the reality we have come to know. In each tale someone in our world today is given insight into these long pondered mysteries. But how would the world really receive the answers?  Truman Pope has spent his whole life watching the world go by–and waiting for something he can’t quite put into words.  A gentle, unassuming soul, he has worked in the mailroom of a large corporation for decades without making waves, until the day he spots a mysterious woman in yellow.  A woman nobody else can see. Soon Truman’s quiet life begins to turn upside-down.  An old lover surfaces from his past even as he finds his job in jeopardy.  Strange visions haunt his days and nights, until he begins to doubt his sanity.  Is he losing his mind, or is he on the brink of a startling revelation that will change his life forever–and transform the nature of humanity?

     

  4. Honor Thy Thug by Wahida Clark
    (Cash Money Content, 2013-04-23, Hardcover)
    Urban lit’s favorite ride or die couple, Trae and Tasha, are back as they fight to hold onto their volatile relationship which gets closer to exploding with each passing day. Their friends, Angel and Kaylin, are caught up in their own drama which pits brother against brother in a final showdown. Faheem and his wife Jaz, face their worst nightmare which almost takes them totally out of the game. Meanwhile, Kyron, who brought Trae to the brink of murder and Tasha to the edge of insanity, is back and hell bent on revenge. When Trae makes the deadly decision to work for the most violent Chinese crime organization in the city and renew a business relationship with Charli Li, the one woman who can never be trusted, his rocky marriage and life are threatened. Tasha is forced to step in, and things get really crazy. Can Trae escape the grips of the mob with his life and hold on to his wife? Honor Thy Thug will leave you gasping for more.

     

  5. Decadence by Eric Jerome Dickey
    (Dutton Adult, 2013-04-23, Hardcover)
    New York Times bestselling author Eric Jerome Dickey returns to the life of Nia Simone Bijou (of Pleasure fame) as she embarks on a quest to enhance her artistic gifts through heightened sensory experience, Hollywood-style. Four years have passed since the events of Pleasure, and Nia’s success as a writer has grown, bringing her from Atlanta to Los Angeles. But she remains on a quest to quiet her inner storm, to draw on her well of emotions and explore them fully before leaving this season of her life and moving on to what could be the next stage: marriage and motherhood. Drawn to an exclusive pleasure palace, where patrons try on roles as they actively shun their respective realities, Nia’s ability to balance truth and fantasy becomes increasingly blurred. What has happened to the compartments she has so carefully created for the different aspects of her life? Will her relationship with the mysterious, often unavailable Prada survive the countless temptations? Will her successful literary career be given over to impulse indulgence? Does decadence know any bounds? When Nia’s past comes back to mingle with her present, and when her staid public persona clashes with her fantasy life of decadence, readers will be stunned by the outcome. Eric Jerome Dickey’s newest tale of excess—and its sky-high costs—is a thrilling portrait of a glittering world.

     

  6. Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America by Melissa V. Harris-Perry
    (Yale University Press, 2013-04-30, Paperback)
    “The insight and grace with which Harris-Perry tackles the thorny issue of African American women’s identity politics makes it a must-read.”—Jordan Kisner, Slate

     

  7. The Cushion in the Road: Meditation and Wandering as the Whole World Awakens to Being in Harm’s Way by Alice Walker
    (New Press, The, 2013-04-09, Hardcover)
    In her newest collection of wide-ranging meditations on our intertwined personal, spiritual, and political destinies, Alice Walker writes that “we are beyond a rigid category of color, sex, or spirituality if we are truly alive.” For the millions of her devoted fans—and for readers of Walker’s bestselling 2006 book We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For in particular—here is a new “gift of words” (Essence) that invites readers on a journey of political awakening and spiritual insight.The Cushion in the Road revisits themes the Pulitzer Prize–winning novelist, poet, essayist, and activist has addressed throughout her career: racism, Africa, solidarity with the Palestinian people, the presidential campaign of Barack Obama, Cuba, healthcare, and the work of Aung San Suu Kyi. In doing so, Walker explores her conflicting impulses to retreat into inner contemplation and to remain deeply engaged with the world. Through the evocative image of the meditation cushion in the road, she finds a delicate balance between these two paths and invites her readers to do so, too.Rich with humor, wisdom, and Walker’s unique eye for the telling details of human experience and the natural world, The Cushion in the Road shows Walker at the height of her literary powers, reveals the depths of her spiritual and political understandings, and will surely be an inspiration for all.

     

  8. Betrayed by Patricia Haley
    (Urban Books, 2013-04-30, Paperback)

     

  9. An Accidental Affair by Eric Jerome Dickey
    (NAL Trade, 2013-04-02, Paperback)
    New York Times bestselling author Eric Jerome Dickey once again “pushes romance and deceit to the next level” (USA Weekend) in this tantalizing tale of a high-profile marriage rocked by scandal, obsession, and murder. Screenwriter James Thicke is a man whose mysterious past runs as deep as his violent streak. Now he and his volatile movie star wife, Regina Baptiste, have channeled their passions into an electrifying new project: a film rumored to cross the boundaries of on-screen sexuality. But it’s James’s limits that are about to be tested—by a surreptitiously filmed video of his wife with her co-star Johnny Bergs, in the most comprising of situations. Within hours, it goes viral. Regina claims she is innocent. But the humiliation and rage leave James with only one recourse—an act of violence that sends him on the run and into hiding. Seething with bitter betrayal, and a still-consuming love for his troubled wife, he nurses a slow-boiling desire for something more permanent: revenge. His need for vengeance takes James and Regina on a headlong odyssey of obsession, sexual impulse, blackmail, and murder. And getting back will be hell.

     

  10. Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed a Nation by Jonathan Rieder
    (Bloomsbury Press, 2013-04-09, Hardcover)
    I am in Birmingham because injustice is here, declared Martin Luther King, Jr. He had come to that city of racist terror convinced that massive protest could topple Jim Crow. But the insurgency faltered. To revive it, King made a sacrificial act on Good Friday, April 12, 1963: he was arrested. Alone in his cell, reading a newspaper, he found a statement from eight “moderate” clergymen who branded the protests extremist and “untimely.” King drafted a furious rebuttal that emerged as the “Letter from Birmingham Jail”-a work that would take its place among the masterpieces of American moral argument alongside those of Thoreau and Lincoln. His insistence on the urgency of “Freedom Now” would inspire not just the marchers of Birmingham and Selma, but peaceful insurgents from Tiananmen to Tahrir Squares. Scholar Jonathan Rieder delves deeper than anyone before into the Letter-illuminating both its timeless message and its crucial position in the history of civil rights. Rieder has interviewed King’s surviving colleagues, and located rare audiotapes of King speaking in the mass meetings of 1963. Gospel of Freedom gives us a startling perspective on the Letter and the man who wrote it: an angry prophet who chastised American whites, found solace in the faith and resilience of the slaves, and knew that moral appeal without struggle never brings justice.

     

  11. Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy by Gary May
    (Basic Books, 2013-04-09, Hardcover)
    When the Fifteenth Amendment of 1870 granted African Americans the right to vote, it seemed as if a new era of political equality was at hand. Before long, however, white segregationists across the South counterattacked, driving their black countrymen from the polls through a combination of sheer terror and insidious devices such as complex literacy tests and expensive poll taxes. Most African Americans would remain voiceless for nearly a century more, citizens in name only until the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act secured their access to the ballot.In Bending Toward Justice, celebrated historian Gary May describes how black voters overcame centuries of bigotry to secure and preserve one of their most important rights as American citizens. The struggle that culminated in the passage of the Voting Rights Act was long and torturous, and only succeeded because of the courageous work of local freedom fighters and national civil rights leaders—as well as, ironically, the opposition of Southern segregationists and law enforcement officials, who won public sympathy for the voting rights movement by brutally attacking peaceful demonstrators. But while the Voting Rights Act represented an unqualified victory over such forces of hate, May explains that its achievements remain in jeopardy. Many argue that the 2008 election of President Barack Obama rendered the act obsolete, yet recent years have seen renewed efforts to curb voting rights and deny minorities the act’s hard-won protections. Legal challenges to key sections of the act may soon lead the Supreme Court to declare those protections unconstitutional.A vivid, fast-paced history of this landmark piece of civil rights legislation, Bending Toward Justice offers a dramatic, timely account of the struggle that finally won African Americans the ballot—although, as May shows, the fight for voting rights is by no means over.

     

  12. Maroon the Implacable: The Collected Writings of Russell Maroon Shoatz by Russell Maroon Shoatz
    (PM Press, 2013-04-01, Paperback)
    During a lengthy incarceration spent mostly in solitary confinement, Russell Maroon Shoatz has developed into a prolific writer and powerful voice for the disenfranchised. This first published collection of his accumulated works showcases his sharp and profound understanding of the current historical moment, with clear proposals for how to move forward embracing new political concepts and practices. Informed by Shoatz’s experience as a leader in the Black Liberation Movement in Philadelphia, the pieces in this book put forth his fresh and self-critical retelling of the black liberation struggle in the United States and provide cutting-edge analysis of the prison-industrial complex. Innovative and revolutionary on multiple levels, the essays also discuss such varied topics as eco-socialism, matriarchy and eco-feminism, food security, prefiguration and the Occupy Wall Street movement. Including new essays written expressly for this volume, Shoatz’s unique perspective offers many practical and theoretical insights for today’s movements for social change.

     

  13. Literary Trails of Eastern North Carolina: A Guidebook (Literary Trails of North Carolina) by Georgann Eubanks
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2013-04-01, Paperback)
    This concluding volume of the Literary Trails of North Carolina trilogy takes readers into an ancient land of pale sand, dense forests, and expansive bays, through towns older than our country and rich in cultural traditions. Here, writers reveal lives long tied to the land and regularly troubled by storms and tell tales of hardship, hard work, and freedom. Eighteen tours lead readers from Raleigh to the Dismal Swamp, the Outer Banks, and across the Sandhills as they explore the region’s connections to over 250 writers of fiction, poetry, plays, and creative nonfiction. Along the way, Georgann Eubanks brings to life the state’s rich literary heritage as she explores these writers’ connection to place and reveals the region’s vibrant local culture. Excerpts invite readers into the authors’ worlds, and web links offer resources for further exploration. Featured authors include A. R. Ammons, Gerald Barrax, Charles Chesnutt, Clyde Edgerton, Philip Gerard, Kaye Gibbons, Harriet Jacobs, Jill McCorkle, Michael Parker, and Bland Simpson. Literary Trails of North Carolina is a project of the North Carolina Arts Council.

     

  14. Native Apostles: Black and Indian Missionaries in the British Atlantic World by Edward E. Andrews
    (Harvard University Press, 2013-04-01, Hardcover)
    As Protestantism expanded across the Atlantic world in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, most evangelists were not white Anglo-Americans, as scholars have long assumed, but members of the same groups that missionaries were trying to convert. Native Apostles offers one of the most significant untold stories in the history of early modern religious encounters, marshalling wide-ranging research to shed light on the crucial role of Native Americans, Africans, and black slaves in Protestant missionary work. The result is a pioneering view of religion’s spread through the colonial world. From New England to the Caribbean, the Carolinas to Africa, Iroquoia to India, Protestant missions relied on long-forgotten native evangelists, who often outnumbered their white counterparts. Their ability to tap into existing networks of kinship and translate between white missionaries and potential converts made them invaluable assets and potent middlemen. Though often poor and ostracized by both whites and their own people, these diverse evangelists worked to redefine Christianity and address the challenges of slavery, dispossession, and European settlement. Far from being advocates for empire, their position as cultural intermediaries gave native apostles unique opportunities to challenge colonialism, situate indigenous peoples within a longer history of Christian brotherhood, and harness scripture to secure a place for themselves and their followers. Native Apostles shows that John Eliot, Eleazar Wheelock, and other well-known Anglo-American missionaries must now share the historical stage with the black and Indian evangelists named Hiacoomes, Good Peter, Philip Quaque, John Quamine, and many more.

     

  15. I’m Forever New York’s Finest part 3 by Kiki Swinson
    (K.S. Publications, 2013-04-16, Paperback)

     

  16. The Underground Railroad in Dekalb County, Illinois by Nancy M. Beasley
    (Mcfarland & Co Inc Pub, 2013-04-02, Paperback)

     

  17. He Don’t Play Fair by Clifford Spud Johnson
    (Urban Books, 2013-04-01, Paperback)
    27 year old Papio gets released from a Federal Correctional Institution in El Reno after serving just 3 years of a 30 year sentence, when his conviction for conspiracy to distribute 45 kilos of cocaine is overturned. Having some unfinished business in Oklahoma City, Papio stops there to romance a few women and collect on some debts before heading out West, avoiding contact with his infuriated Cuban connection by all means. Never settling for less than the best in hotels, luxury vehicles, and designer clothing follow Papio on his journey across the states that takes some unexpected twists and turns which make this tale extra Special! Don’t get caught up, because HE DON’T PLAY FAIR.

     

  18. The Lost Daughter: A Memoir by Mary Williams
    (Blue Rider Press, 2013-04-09, Hardcover)
    A daughter of the Black Panther movement tells her remarkable life story of being raised amid violence and near-poverty, adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda, and finding her way back home.   As she grew up in 1970s Oakland, California, role models for Mary Williams were few and far between: her father was often in prison, her older sister was a teenage prostitute, and her hot-tempered mother struggled to raise six children alone. When Mary was thirteen, a silver lining appeared in her life: she was invited to spend a summer at Laurel Springs Children’s Camp, run by Jane Fonda and her then husband, Tom Hayden. Mary flourished at camp, and over the course of several summers, she began confiding in Fonda about her difficulties at home. During one school year, Mary suffered a nightmare assault crime, which she kept secret until she told a camp counselor and Fonda. After providing care and therapy for Mary, Fonda invited her to come live with her family.   Practically overnight, Mary left the streets of Oakland for the star-studded climes of Santa Monica. Jane Fonda was the parent Mary had never had—outside the limelight and Hollywood parties, Fonda was a wonderful mom who helped with homework, listened to adolescent fears, celebrated achievements, and offered inspiration and encouragement at every turn.   Mary’s life since has been one of adventure and opportunity—from hiking the Appalachian Trail solo, working with the Lost Boys of Sudan, and living in the frozen reaches of Antarctica. Her most courageous trip, though, involved returning to Oakland and reconnecting with her biological mother and family, many of whom she hadn’t seen since the day she left home. The Lost Daughter is a chronicle of her journey back in time, an exploration of fractured family bonds, and a moving epic of self-discovery.

     

2012′s Bestselling African American Books for the Kindle

Here are the upcoming Amazon Kindle bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson
    (Little, Brown and Company, 2012-11-12, Kindle Edition)
    It’s Christmas Eve and Detective Alex Cross has been called out to catch someone who’s robbing his church’s poor box. That mission behind him, Alex returns home to celebrate with Bree, Nana, and his children. The tree decorating is barely underway before his phone rings again–a horrific hostage situation is quickly spiraling out of control. Away from his own family on the most precious of days, Alex calls upon every ounce of his training, creativity, and daring to save another family. Alex risks everything–and he may not make it back alive on this most sacred of family days. Alex Cross is a hero for our time, and never more so than in this story of family, action, and the deepest moral choices. MERRY CHRISTMAS, ALEX CROSS will be a holiday classic for years to come.

     

  2. The Twelve Tribes of Hattie (Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 Digital Edition) by Ayana Mathis
    (Knopf, 2012-12-06, Kindle Edition)
    The newest Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 selection: this special eBook edition of The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis features exclusive content, including Oprah’s personal notes highlighted within the text, and a reading group guide.
    Ayana Mathis tells the story of the children of the Great Migration through the trials of one unforgettable family. In 1923, fifteen-year-old Hattie Shepherd flees Georgia and settles in Philadelphia, hoping for a chance at a better life. Instead, she marries a man who will bring her nothing but disappointment and watches helplessly as her firstborn twins succumb to an illness a few pennies could have prevented.  Hattie gives birth to nine more children whom she raises with grit and mettle and not an ounce of the tenderness they crave.  She vows to prepare them for the calamitous difficulty they are sure to face in their later lives, to meet a world that will not love them, a world that will not be kind. Captured here in twelve luminous narrative threads, their lives tell the story of a mother’s monumental courage and the journey of a nation.  Beautiful and devastating, Ayana Mathis’s The Twelve Tribes of Hattie is wondrous from first to last—glorious, harrowing, unexpectedly uplifting, and blazing with life. An emotionally transfixing page-turner, a searing portrait of striving in the face of insurmountable adversity, an indelible encounter with the resilience of the human spirit and the driving force of the American dream.  

     

  3. Guilty Pleasures by Niyah Moore
    (Ambiance Books, 2012-12-12, Kindle Edition)
    WHAT’S YOUR GUILTY PLEASURE? Married lawyer, Hassan Walker, can’t seem to get enough of the Sugar Hill Gentleman’s Club, as he is in love with Jada James, a sultry dancer with an alter ego, Cinnamon. Unable to shake the taunting images of her out of his head, Hassan can not even have sex with his own wife, Roxi Walker, without envisioning his Sugar Hill temptress. Meanwhile, Roxi can no longer hide the secret affair that has swept her away from reality. Given an ultimatum to stop cheating or to lose her husband for good, Roxi tries but cannot seem to fulfill her husband’s request completely. Once all of the guilty pleasures start coming to light, Hassan, Roxi, Jada along with Ivan, Victoria, and Dawn will stop at nothing to cover up their dirty little secrets.

     

  4. Hated by Many, Loved by None by Shan
    (SBR Publications, 2012-11-15, Kindle Edition)
    Jahzara, Honey and Tomeka are best friends til the end. The three of them would die for each other and have always had each other’s back. They each desperately wanted better lives and were willing to work extra hard in order to attain it. Relationship issues in their personal lives bring the girls closer together than ever before- especially when Jahzara brings a business proposal to the table. Betrayal, lies, jealousy and murder is only the beginning of what they have to overcome. Will they succumb to it all or will they rise above it and find their way out?

     

  5. A Cinderella Story: Book One (The Come-Up) by CE Ryan
    (CE Ryan, 2012-12-17, Kindle Edition)
    Jayda Monroe knew she deserved more out of life than her menial, thankless job and constant struggle with money. Wanting more for herself had always left her disappointed, until finally, she took a leap of faith and decided to start living on her own terms and calling her own shots. Enter Shane Morris, the hottest hip hop star in the music world; there is nothing his money can’t buy and his wealth seems to be limitless. And the moment he lays eyes on Jayda, her entire life begins to change. Follow this ambitious young woman on her quest to live abundantly, be indulged shamelessly and become a BOSS in her own right.

     

  6. Ti Amo (Battaglia Mafia Series) by Sienna Mynx
    (The Divas Pen LLC, 2012-12-12, Kindle Edition)
    Book 2 in the Battaglia Mafia Series (Book 1 – Destino by Sienna Mynx)Let there be war…Don Giovanni Battaglia will have his revenge. A bloody Mafia war has ravaged the southern region of Italy. Every man, woman, and child born under the name Calderone must be made to atone. That is the law. After two years of blood and bullets, the men sworn to follow without question find themselves wanting peace. But how can there be peace when the one person able to save their Don from the destructive path he is on is beyond their reach. Or is she?Mira Ellison lives…It’s 1991 and Mira has learned how to begin again. Her best friend is dead, and the fashion empire she built from scratch is now gone. All she has left is the fleeting memory of a bittersweet love, and a mocha-brown baby with her father’s eyes. She now has one single goal, to survive. She must protect her baby and hide from the Mafia men she is convinced are out to kill her. But is it all a lie? Soon Mira finds herself confronted by her past, and face to face with the man she loves but doesn’t trust. And Giovanni Battaglia is furious. He gives Mira a choice. She can become his Donna or be his enemy. And this time Mira has more than her life to lose.

     

  7. The Warmest December by Bernice L. McFadden
    (Akashic Books, 2012-01-15, Kindle Edition)
    The long-awaited reissue of McFadden’s best-selling second novel praised by Toni Morrison, USA Today, Washington Post, and others–published simultaneously with McFadden’s new novel Gathering of Waters.”[A] masterpiece . . . full of heart and emotion . . . I hope you love the book as much as I did, and I hope it moves you as much as it did me, changes you as it did me.”–James Frey, author of A Million Little Pieces, from the new introductionFor Kenzie, growing up in the Lowe household means opening the bottom drawer of her father’s dresser to choose which belt she’ll be whipped with that night, furtive trips to the Bee Hive liquor store for her father’s vodka, and dreaming of the day she can escape apartment 5A.Buoyed by the lyrical, redemptive voice that characterizes McFadden’s writing, The Warmest December tells the powerful, deeply moving story of one Brooklyn family and the alcoholism and abuse that marked the years of their lives. Narrated by Kenzie Lowe, a young woman reminiscent of Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, the story moves fluidly between the past and the present as she visits her dying father and finds that choices she once thought beyond her control are very much hers to make. The Warmest December is ultimately a cathartic tale of hope, healing, and forgiveness.

     

  8. The Ultimate Merger (Hot Latin Men) by Delaney Diamond
    (Delaney Diamond, 2012-07-13, Kindle Edition)
    Two workaholics slow down long enough to find love when they least expect it.Renaldo da Silva is on the verge of entering the U.S. market with the purchase of a hotel in downtown Chicago. After working hard for several days straight, he heads to a local bar and sees a woman who instantly makes him reconsider how to spend his evening.When another one of her male counterparts unfairly becomes the lead on a project, Sabrina Porter leaves work intent on drowning her sorrows in wine and loud music at a local bar. Instead, she meets a sexy Brazilian who’s intent on showing her a different way to unwind.The Ultimate Merger is a short story. It’s the prequel to Second Chances, Book 4 of the Hot Latin Men series.

     

  9. Unique by Nikki Turner
    (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2012-10-30, Kindle Edition)
    With only two hundred dollars, Unique packed her suitcase and headed to New York City for a brand new start.  It’s there that Unique meets big time boxing promoter, Kennard and it is love at first sight.  However, after nine months of living in the lap of luxury with Kennard, skeletons from Unique’s past show up and it will cost her a cool million dollars to not only keep her relationship but her life.  But Unique isn’t about to lose it all.  With the help of her best friend, she devises a major heist and to pull it off all she has to do it stay alive. 

     

  10. Uncle Catfish by Chandra Borden
    (Bergerdergan Publishing LLC, 2012-10-31, Kindle Edition)
    I’m a daddy’s girl. But that wasn’t always the case. For years I used to run to my father’s arms, squealing “Daddy, Daddy,” with hopes of stealing his heart. In return, Len Earle Woods would greet me the way he greeted everyone, with a laid back demeanor and a cool-dude smile. I wasn’t a daddy’s girl at that point. I was just another kid.But it would take one visit from Uncle Catfish, the summer before my eighth grade year, to change all of that.

     

  11. A Gangsta’s Bitch Pt 1 by Leo Sullivan
    (Sullivan Publications, LLC, 2012-08-08, Kindle Edition)
    Gina Thomas is a gangsta’s bitch, down for whatever. Even after her man, Jack Lemon, is sent to prison, Gina does what she has to do for herself and her man. When Jack wins his appeal, vengeance is no longer just for the lord.Follow Gina as she rides out for her man, and shows how a real Gangsta’s Bitch gets down.

     

  12. Daddy Dearest by Kevin Bullock
    (2012-08-29, Kindle Edition)
    After Carl “Hammer” Bobbit was sentenced to fifteen years in prison, he became obsessed with his daughter, Cataya.
    Through his best friend, Ron, he controls every aspect of her life. He regulates where she goes, what she watches on T.V and who she hangs with. He knows that Cataya hates him, but his fatherly instincts won’t allow him to lighten up, or confess to his guilt.
    Now that Cataya is a senior in high school, she has been living with her father’s mother ever since her own mother had been found murdered twelve years prior. She has very little contact with her mother’s side of the family, but has learned through them the truth surrounding her mother’s unsolved death.
    She proves that she’s cut from the same cloth as her father when she formulates an icy plan that would punish Hammer for the role that he played in her mother’s death. But she gets side tracked when Hammer escapes from prison and give the real meaning to Daddy Dearest.

     

  13. The Cartel 4: Diamonds are Forever by Ashley
    (Urban Books, 2012-11-01, Kindle Edition)
    You thought The Cartel was over, but Diamonds are forever. . . .The Diamond family has survived murder, deceit, and betrayal. Through it all, they’re still standing tall, and a new era has begun. After surviving a failed attempt on her life, Breeze has moved into the queen’s position by Zyir’s side. Zyir has taken over the empire and locked down Miami’s streets. He has the world in his palms, but there is always new blood ready to overthrow the throne. Young Carter has retired and moved away from the madness—that is, until he gets an unexpected visitor at his home. This person shakes up the whole family, causing chaos that threatens to bring down the Cartel for good. New York Times bestselling authors Ashley and JaQuavis deliver the highly anticipated fourth installment of the wildly popular Cartel series.

     

  14. Fifty Shades of Jungle Fever (The Ghetto Girl Romance Quadrilogy) by L. V. Lewis
    (Jungle Fever Press, 2012-10-30, Kindle Edition)
    FIFTY SHADES OF GREY to the second power meets Keisha and Jada from the Block. If you’ve wondered how an ethnic girl from the hood might’ve handled an arrangement with an experienced white Dominant, this is your book. If you’d like to see the sexiest TWIN DOMS in a contemporary romance series in interracial relationships, this is most definitely your book. Aspiring recording studio owners, Keisha Beale and Jada Jameson, score a rare meeting with venture capitalist Tristan White, and are thrust into a world beyond their wildest imaginations. Street-wise Keisha is startled to realize she wants this rich white man, despite the certainty that he is out of her league. Unable to resist Keisha’s sassy, irreverent, and fiercely independent spirit, Tristan knew from day one he wanted her, too–as his first African American submissive. Upper Class Jada of the Springfield Jamesons has traveled in almost the same circles as the White brothers, and has had a secret crush on Nathan White, the point guard for the Chicago Bulls, for quite some time. Both brothers have succumbed to jungle fever, and want a little coffee in their cream. Lured by Tristan White and his offer of fronting the capital for her business in exchange for kinky sex, Keisha finds herself with no other option. Keisha is also tortured by a demons from her past, and her inability to come to terms with them threatens to undermine the future of her business and her tumultuous, unconventional relationship with Tristan White. Erotic, amusing, and in places hilarious, the Ghetto Girl Erotica Trilogy is a parody with a unique take on a Fifty Shades-type story that will take you even further into the BDSM world, and promises to make the vanilla original Fifty Shades Blacker. The first two books focus on Keisha and Tristan’s romance, and the final two focus on Jada and Nathan’s.

     

  15. Hood Love by Leondra LeRae
    (, 2012-10-09, Kindle Edition)
    Jonnae is tired, tired of her trifling dude Chink & tired of her chaotic home life. The chance meeting of Capo turns things from upside down to good all around. Take a ride with Jonnae as she realizes your first love isn’t always real love & that hood love can be a good love.

     

  16. Salty: A Ghetto Soap Opera (Drama In The Hood) by Aleta Williams
    (Alana’s Book Line, 2012-03-28, Kindle Edition)
    This Intriguing, Sassy, Grimy, and Envious Ghetto Soap Opera is filled with street drama that will put you right in the mix of the madness…. At the end, you may even feel “Salty” yourself!To some, the city of Los Angeles is the home of the “Angels”; “that’s bull crap”, says the characters in this ghetto soap opera. Los Angeles for them, is the home of the “Scandalous” and only those that’s down for and ready for whatever will last…Jazz is a seventeen year old, sassy, diva who strives to carry herself with class and dignity. Thanks to her ego struck boyfriend, and envious cousin,she soon finds out that classiness will get you nowhere, but humiliated and heartbroken. Peter went from a nobody to a somebody: money, cars, and big butt light skin girls now make up his worth. Peter isn’t blind to the fact that he is being used; he just doesn’t care. It’s not until he steps on the toes of a known grimy gangster from Compton, that he realizes how dangerous these females really are. Pam can tell you first hand that “love don’t love nobody”, and that you have to love yourself first. After all, love is the reason she contracted the incurable.Follow the drama as it takes you on a world wind of events that will leave your mouth open and have you lusting for more.facebook.com/SaltyAGhettoSoapOpera

     

  17. Juicy- Pandora’s Box by Nicety
    (, 2012-08-25, Kindle Edition)
    Growing up in an abusive home took a toll on Chicago twin sisters Pandora and Diamond and their 16-year-old sister, Lexi. An overbearing, controlling father pushes them to the edge and when enough became enough, they devised a plan to get out of his grasp for good. Sun was their unsuspecting victim and everything seemed to be going according to plan until Pandora decided to change the game. Now with blood on their hands, a newfound business and two suitcases full of cash, Pandora thinks she is sitting on top of the world. Forbidden fruit is tastier when it’s not rightfully yours as she pursues Diamond’s crush, Kojack, under false pretenses. Lexi is only 16 but her love of Yompers keeps her feeling grown and sexy as she does any and everything she wants while still trying to remain loyal to her sisters. But that is all tested when Pandora shows her sisters that blood isn’t thicker than water. Will Pandora remain on top or will she crash and burn? Find out!

     

  18. Poison in the Shadows (Crimson Murder Mysteries) by J. K. Crimson
    (Manic Books, 2012-05-01, Kindle Edition)
    After nearly being fatally shot and left for dead in the grim streets of Detroit, ex-stripper, now turned homicide detective, Jordan Crimson, is still haunted by her past demons of when her street hustling boyfriend killed her best friend ten years ago. She had been successful at moving on while working around the clock solving murders to take her mind away from the emptiness and regret in her life. Until the body of Samantha Cox is discovered. As Jordan uncovers Samantha’s secret life of lies, sex, and betrayal, the past demons she thought were buried, are back once again. Will her investigation lead to Samantha’s killer or face to face of her own death?

     

2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here’s a list of 2012′s bestselling African American books from Amazon.com as of September 2012.

  1. The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander
    (New Press, The, 2012-01-16, Paperback)
    The New Jim Crow was initially published with a modest first printing and reasonable expectations for a hard-hitting book on a tough topic. Now, ten-plus printings later, the long-awaited paperback version of the book Lani Guinier calls “brave and bold,” and Pulitzer Prize–winner David Levering Lewis calls “stunning,” will at last be available.In the era of colorblindness, it is no longer socially permissible to use race, explicitly, as a justification for discrimination, exclusion, and social contempt. Yet, as legal star Michelle Alexander reveals, today it is perfectly legal to discriminate against convicted criminals in nearly all the ways that it was once legal to discriminate against African Americans. Once you’re labeled a felon, the old forms of discrimination—employment discrimination, housing discrimination, denial of the right to vote, denial of educational opportunity, denial of food stamps and other public benefits, and exclusion from jury service—are suddenly legal.
    Featured on The Tavis Smiley Show, Bill Moyers Journal, Democracy Now, and C-Span’s Washington Journal, The New Jim Crow has become an overnight phenomenon, sparking a much-needed conversation—including a recent mention by Cornel West on Real Time with Bill Maher — about ways in which our system of mass incarceration has come to resemble systems of racial control from a different era.

     

  2. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson
    (Little, Brown and Company, 2012-11-12, Hardcover)
    It’s Christmas Eve and Detective Alex Cross has been called out to catch someone who’s robbing his church’s poor box. That mission behind him, Alex returns home to celebrate with Bree, Nana, and his children. The tree decorating is barely underway before his phone rings again–a horrific hostage situation is quickly spiraling out of control. Away from his own family on the most precious of days, Alex calls upon every ounce of his training, creativity, and daring to save another family. Alex risks everything–and he may not make it back alive on this most sacred of family days. Alex Cross is a hero for our time, and never more so than in this story of family, action, and the deepest moral choices.

     

  3. The Cutting Season: A Novel by Attica Locke
    (Harper, 2012-09-18, Hardcover)
    In Black Water Rising, Attica Locke delivered one of the most stunning and sure-handed fiction debuts in recent memory, garnering effusive critical praise, several award nominations, and passionate reader response. Now Locke returns with The Cutting Season, a riveting thriller that intertwines two murders separated across more than a century. Caren Gray manages Belle Vie, a sprawling antebellum plantation that sits between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, where the past and the present coexist uneasily. The estate’s owners have turned the place into an eerie tourist attraction, complete with full-dress re-enactments and carefully restored slave quarters. Outside the gates, a corporation with ambitious plans has been busy snapping up land from struggling families who have been growing sugar cane for generations, and now replacing local employees with illegal laborers. Tensions mount when the body of a female migrant worker is found in a shallow grave on the edge of the property, her throat cut clean. As the investigation gets under way, the list of suspects grows. But when fresh evidence comes to light and the sheriff’s department zeros in on a person of interest, Caren has a bad feeling that the police are chasing the wrong leads. Putting herself at risk, she ventures into dangerous territory as she unearths startling new facts about a very old mystery—the long-ago disappearance of a former slave—that has unsettling ties to the current murder. In pursuit of the truth about Belle Vie’s history and her own, Caren discovers secrets about both cases—ones that an increasingly desperate killer will stop at nothing to keep buried. Taut, hauntingly resonant, and beautifully written, The Cutting Season is at once a thoughtful meditation on how America reckons its past with its future, and a high-octane page-turner that unfolds with tremendous skill and vision. With her rare gift for depicting human nature in all its complexities, Attica Locke demonstrates once again that she is “destined for literary stardom” (Dallas Morning News).

     

  4. The Communist by Paul Kengor
    (Mercury Ink, 2012-07-17, Hardcover)
    In his memoir, Barack Obama omits the full name of his mentor, simply calling him “Frank.” Now, the truth is out: Never has a figure as deeply troubling and controversial as Frank Marshall Davis had such an impact on the development of an American president. Although other radical influences on Obama, from Jeremiah Wright to Bill Ayers, have been scrutinized, the public knows little about Davis, a card-carrying member of the Communist Party USA, cited by the Associated Press as an “important influence” on Obama, one whom he “looked to” not merely for “advice on living” but as a “father” figure. While the Left has willingly dismissed Davis (with good reason), here are the indisputable, eye-opening facts: Frank Marshall Davis was a pro-Soviet, pro–Red China communist. His Communist Party USA card number, revealed in FBI files, was CP #47544. He was a prototype of the loyal Soviet patriot, so radical that the FBI placed him on the federal government’s Security Index. In the early 1950s, Davis opposed U.S. attempts to slow Stalin and Mao. He favored Red Army takeovers of Central and Eastern Europe, and communist control in Korea and Vietnam. Dutifully serving the cause, he edited and wrote for communist newspapers in both Chicago and Honolulu, courting contributors who were Soviet agents. In the 1970s, amid this dangerous political theater, Frank Marshall Davis came into Barack Obama’s life. Aided by access to explosive declassified FBI files, Soviet archives, and Davis’s original newspaper columns, Paul Kengor explores how Obama sought out Davis and how Davis found in Obama an impressionable young man, one susceptible to Davis’s worldview that opposed American policy and traditional values while praising communist regimes. Kengor sees remnants of this worldview in Obama’s early life and even, ultimately, his presidency.

     

  5. Yes, Chef: A Memoir by Marcus Samuelsson
    (Random House, 2012-06-26, Hardcover)
    It begins with a simple ritual: Every Saturday afternoon, a boy who loves to cook walks to his grandmother’s house and helps her prepare a roast chicken for dinner. The grandmother is Swedish, a retired domestic. The boy is Ethiopian and adopted, and he will grow up to become the world-renowned chef Marcus Samuelsson. This book is his love letter to food and family in all its manifestations. 
    Yes, Chef chronicles Marcus Samuelsson’s remarkable journey from Helga’s humble kitchen to some of the most demanding and cutthroat restaurants in Switzerland and France, from his grueling stints on cruise ships to his arrival in New York City, where his outsize talent and ambition finally come together at Aquavit, earning him a coveted New York Times three-star rating at the age of twenty-four. But Samuelsson’s career of  “chasing flavors,” as he calls it, had only just begun—in the intervening years, there have been White House state dinners, career crises, reality show triumphs and, most important, the opening of the beloved Red Rooster in Harlem. At Red Rooster, Samuelsson has fufilled his dream of creating a truly diverse, multiracial dining room—a place where presidents and prime ministers rub elbows with jazz musicians, aspiring artists, bus drivers, and nurses. It is a place where an orphan from Ethiopia, raised in Sweden, living in America, can feel at home.  
    With disarming honesty and intimacy, Samuelsson also opens up about his failures—the price of ambition, in human terms—and recounts his emotional journey, as a grown man, to meet the father he never knew. Yes, Chef is a tale of personal discovery, unshakable determination, and the passionate, playful pursuit of flavors—one man’s struggle to find a place for himself in the kitchen, and in the world.

     

  6. It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership by Colin Powell
    (Harper, 2012-05-22, Hardcover)
    It Worked for Me is filled with vivid experiences and lessons learned that have shaped the legendary public service career of the four-star general and former Secretary of State Colin Powell. At its heart are Powell’s “Thirteen Rules”—notes he gathered over the years and that now form the basis of his leadership presentations given throughout the world. Powell’s short but sweet rules—among them, “Get mad, then get over it” and “Share credit”—are illustrated by revealing personal stories that introduce and expand upon his principles for effective leadership: conviction, hard work, and, above all, respect for others. In work and in life, Powell writes, “it’s about how we touch and are touched by the people we meet. It’s all about the people.” A natural storyteller, Powell offers warm and engaging parables with wise advice on succeeding in the workplace and beyond. “Trust your people,” he counsels as he delegates presidential briefing responsibilities to two junior State Department desk officers. “Do your best—someone is watching,” he advises those just starting out, recalling his own teenage summer job mopping floors in a soda-bottling factory. Powell combines the insights he has gained serving in the top ranks of the military and in four presidential administrations with the lessons he’s learned from his immigrant-family upbringing in the Bronx, his training in the ROTC, and his growth as an Army officer. The result is a powerful portrait of a leader who is reflective, self-effacing, and grateful for the contributions of everyone he works with. Colin Powell’s It Worked for Me is bound to inspire, move, and surprise readers. Thoughtful and revealing, it is a brilliant and original blueprint for leadership.

     

  7. Trouble & Triumph: A Novel of Power & Beauty by Tip “T.I.” Harris
    (William Morrow, 2012-09-18, Hardcover)
    Grammy Award-winning hip-hop artist, music producer, and actor T.I. and his bestselling celebrity collaborator, David Ritz, continue the explosive story of Power and Beauty that began in the street-lit epic Power & Beauty. When his mother, Charlotte, was killed, Paul “Power” Clay and his closest friend, Tanya “Beauty” Long, fell under the spell of a savvy and ruthless Atlanta businessman named Slim, who promised to protect them. Wise beyond her years, Beauty always knew that the only person she could rely on was herself. It didn’t take long for the levelheaded young woman to recognize the simmering violence beneath Slim’s street charm. But getting away from him wasn’t easy, and it came at a heartbreaking price: turning her back on Power. Escaping to the glamorous catwalks of the Big Apple, she’s worked her breathtaking good looks and quick wit to build a thriving fashion business. Despite her success, she’s still haunted by the pain of leaving Power behind. Money and new men cannot erase the memory of the true love she denied. To Power, Slim’s world held everything he thought he wanted: women, wealth, power, authority. He discovered too late that Slim Simmons isn’t just a businessman—he’s a ruthless killer who will turn on anyone he thinks is getting in his way. He is the monster who murdered Charlotte. Now, he controls the fate of her only son. But neither Slim nor Power count on Beauty. Like Slim, she is a master who will manipulate, seduce, and sacrifice to get what she wants. She’s never let anything stop her from fulfilling her desires, and she will broker a dangerous bargain to save the only man she’s ever loved. But is saving Power worth sacrificing herself—body and soul? Will his youthful ambitions lead him to redemption—or deeper into the darkness? Will they both become everything they swore they’d never be? A tale of gangstas and sistas, money masters and politicians, that moves across the globe from Paris to New York, Atlanta to Tokyo, the Caribbean to California, Trouble & Triumph is a hip-hop mash-up of loyalty, betrayal, revenge, desire, greed, family, politics, and absolution—and of two unforgettable young star-crossed lovers from the streets who will risk everything for their dreams . . . and for each other.

     

  8. Salvage the Bones: A Novel by Jesmyn Ward
    (Bloomsbury USA, 2012-04-24, Paperback)
    Winner of the 2011 National Book Award A hurricane is building over the Gulf of Mexico, threatening the coastal town of Bois Sauvage, Mississippi, and Esch’s father is growing concerned. A hard drinker, largely absent, he doesn’t show concern for much else. Esch and her three brothers are stocking food, but there isn’t much to save. Lately, Esch can’t keep down what food she gets; she’s fourteen and pregnant. Her brother Skeetah is sneaking scraps for his prized pitbull’s new litter, dying one by one in the dirt. Meanwhile, brothers Randall and Junior try to stake their claim in a family long on child’s play and short on parenting.As the twelve days that make up the novel’s framework yield to their dramatic conclusion, this unforgettable family-motherless children sacrificing for one another as they can, protecting and nurturing where love is scarce-pulls itself up to face another day. A big-hearted novel about familial love and community against all odds, and a wrenching look at the lonesome, brutal, and restrictive realities of rural poverty, Salvage the Bones is muscled with poetry, revelatory, and real.

     

  9. The Cartel 4 by Ashley and JaQuavis
    (Kensington, 2012-11-01, Paperback)
    [MP3CD audiobook format in vinyl case.] [Read by Cary Hite] New York Times bestselling authors Ashley and JaQuavis deliver the highly anticipated fourth installment of the wildly popular ‘Cartel’ series. You thought the Cartel was over, but Diamonds are forever . . . The Diamond family has survived murder, deceit, and betrayal. Through it all, they’re still standing tall, and a new era has begun. After surviving an attempt on her life, Breeze has moved into the queen’s position by Zyir’s side. Zyir has taken over the empire and locked down Miami’s streets; the world is in his hands. But there is always new blood ready to overthrow the throne. Young Carter has retired and moved away from the madness — that is, until he gets an unexpected visitor at his home. This person shakes up the whole family, causing chaos that threatens to bring down the Cartel for good. [*Produced by Buck 50 Productions]

     

  10. Kill Alex Cross by James Patterson
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2012-05-22, Paperback)
    The only wayDetective Alex Cross is one of the first on the scene of the biggest case he’s ever been part of. The President’s son and daughter have been abducted from their school – an impossible crime, but somehow the kidnapper has done it. Alex does everything he can but is shunted to the fringes of the investigation. Someone powerful doesn’t want Cross too close.To stop Alex CrossA deadly contagion in the DC water supply threatens to cripple the capital, and Alex sees the looming shape of the most devastating attack the United States has ever experienced. He is already working flat-out on the abduction, and this massive assault pushes Cross completely over the edge.Is to kill himWith each hour that passes, the chance of finding the children alive diminishes. In an emotional private meeting, the First Lady asks Alex to please save her kids. Even the highest security clearance doesn’t get him any closer to the kidnapper – and Alex makes a desperate decision that goes against everything he believes. A full-throttle thriller with unstoppable action, unrestrained emotion, and relentless suspense, Kill Alex Cross is the most gripping Alex Cross novel James Patterson has ever written.

     

  11. An Invisible Thread: The True Story of an 11-Year-Old Panhandler, a Busy Sales Executive, and an Unlikely Meeting with Destiny by Laura Schroff
    (Howard Books, 2012-08-07, Paperback)
    Stopping was never part of the plan . . . She was a successful ad sales rep in Manhattan. He was a homeless, eleven-year-old panhandler on the street. He asked for spare change; she kept walking. But then something stopped her in her tracks, and she went back. And she continued to go back, again and again. They met up nearly every week for years and built an unexpected, life-changing friendship that has today spanned almost three decades. Whatever made me notice him on that street corner so many years ago is clearly something that cannot be extinguished, no matter how relentless the forces aligned against it. Some may call it spirit. Some may call it heart. It drew me to him, as if we were bound by some invisible, unbreakable thread. And whatever it is, it binds us still.

     

  12. Home by Toni Morrison
    (Knopf, 2012-05-08, Hardcover)
    America’s most celebrated novelist, Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison extends her profound take on our history with this twentieth-century tale of redemption: a taut and tortured story about one man’s desperate search for himself in a world disfigured by war.Frank Money is an angry, self-loathing veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. His home may seem alien to him, but he is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from and that he’s hated all his life. As Frank revisits his memories from childhood and the war that have left him questioning his sense of self, he discovers a profound courage he had thought he could never possess again. A deeply moving novel about an apparently defeated man finding his manhood—and his home.

     

  13. The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild by Lawrence Anthony
    (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2012-05-22, Paperback)
    When South African conservationist Lawrence Anthony was asked to accept a herd of “rogue” wild elephants on his Thula Thula game reserve in Zululand, his common sense told him to refuse. But he was the herd’s last chance of survival: they would be killed if he wouldn’t take them. In order to save their lives, Anthony took them in. In the years that followed he became a part of their family. And as he battled to create a bond with the elephants, he came to realize that they had a great deal to teach him about life, loyalty, and freedom. The Elephant Whisperer is a heartwarming, exciting, funny, and sometimes sad account of Anthony’s experiences with these huge yet sympathetic creatures. Set against the background of life on an African game reserve, with unforgettable characters and exotic wildlife, it is a delightful book that will appeal to animal lovers and adventurous souls everywhere.

     

  14. Open City: A Novel by Teju Cole
    (Random House Trade Paperbacks, 2012-01-17, Paperback)
    A haunting novel about identity, dislocation, and history, Teju Cole’s Open City is a profound work by an important new author who has much to say about our country and our world.   Along the streets of Manhattan, a young Nigerian doctor named Julius wanders, reflecting on his relationships, his recent breakup with his girlfriend, his present, his past. He encounters people from different cultures and classes who will provide insight on his journey—which takes him to Brussels, to the Nigeria of his youth, and into the most unrecognizable facets of his own soul.

     

  15. Love, Life, and Elephants: An African Love Story by Daphne Sheldrick
    (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012-05-08, Hardcover)
    Daphne Sheldrick, whose family arrived in Africa from Scotland in the 1820s, is the first person ever to have successfully hand-reared newborn elephants. Her deep empathy and understanding, her years of observing Kenya’s rich variety of wildlife, and her pioneering work in perfecting the right husbandry and milk formula have saved countless elephants, rhinos, and other baby animals from certain death. In this heartwarming and poignant memoir, Daphne shares her amazing relationships with a host of orphans, including her first love, Bushy, a liquid-eyed antelope; Rickey-Tickey-Tavey, the little dwarf mongoose; Gregory Peck, the busy buffalo weaver bird; Huppety, the mischievous zebra; and the majestic elephant Eleanor, with whom Daphne has shared more than forty years of great friendship.  But this is also a magical and heartbreaking human love story between Daphne and David Sheldrick, the famous Tsavo Park warden. It was their deep and passionate love, David’s extraordinary insight into all aspects of nature, and the tragedy of his early death that inspired Daphne’s vast array of achievements, most notably the founding of the world-renowned David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and the Orphans’ Nursery in Nairobi National Park, where Daphne continues to live and work to this day.  Encompassing not only David and Daphne’s tireless campaign for an end to poaching and for conserving Kenya’s wildlife, but also their ability to engage with the human side of animals and their rearing of the orphans expressly so they can return to the wild, Love, Life, and Elephants is alive with compassion and humor, providing a rare insight into the life of one of the world’s most remarkable women.

     

  16. The Story of Beautiful Girl by Rachel Simon
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2012-02-13, Paperback)
    It is 1968. Lynnie, a young white woman with a developmental disability, and Homan, an African American deaf man, are locked away in an institution, the School for the Incurable and Feebleminded, and have been left to languish, forgotten. Deeply in love, they escape, and find refuge in the farmhouse of Martha, a retired schoolteacher and widow. But the couple is not alone-Lynnie has just given birth to a baby girl. When the authorities catch up to them that same night, Homan escapes into the darkness, and Lynnie is caught. But before she is forced back into the institution, she whispers two words to Martha: “Hide her.” And so begins the 40-year epic journey of Lynnie, Homan, Martha, and baby Julia-lives divided by seemingly insurmountable obstacles, yet drawn together by a secret pact and extraordinary love.

     

  17. Murderville 2: The Epidemic by Ashley
    (Cash Money Content, 2012-07-24, Paperback)
    New York Times best-selling authors Ashley & JaQuavis are back with the second installment in the epic Murderville Series. Love, murder, loyalty, and money fill this hood tale as they continue this international street saga. With Samad’s target on her back, Liberty must survive the harsh streets alone. but when a chance encounter pushes her into the arms of a new friend, Po, the two take on the California kingpin and step full force into the game. As bullets and sparks fly, the unlikely pair embark on a serendipitous journey back to where it all started, Sierra Leone. With a new overseas connection, Po sees an opportunity that is too good to pass up. When his pursuit of the American dream conflicts with Liberty’s past, will they be able to survive? Or will the drug empire that they’ve built together come crashing down?

     

  18. The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln by Stephen L. Carter
    (Knopf, 2012-07-10, Hardcover)
    From the best-selling author of The Emperor of Ocean Park and New England White, a daring reimagining of one of the most tumultuous moments in our nation’s past   Stephen L. Carter’s thrilling new novel takes as its starting point an alternate history: President Abraham Lincoln survives the assassination attempt at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. Two years later he is charged with overstepping his constitutional authority, both during and after the Civil War, and faces an impeachment trial . . . Twenty-one-year-old Abigail Canner is a young black woman with a degree from Oberlin, a letter of employment from the law firm that has undertaken Lincoln’s defense, and the iron-strong conviction, learned from her late mother, that “whatever limitations society might place on ordinary negroes, they would never apply to her.” And so Abigail embarks on a life that defies the norms of every stratum of Washington society: working side by side with a white clerk, meeting the great and powerful of the nation, including the president himself.  But when Lincoln’s lead counsel is found brutally murdered on the eve of the trial, Abigail is plunged into a treacherous web of intrigue and conspiracy reaching the highest levels of the divided government. Here is a vividly imagined work of historical fiction that captures the emotional tenor of post–Civil War America, a brilliantly realized courtroom drama that explores the always contentious question of the nature of presidential authority, and a galvanizing story of political suspense.

     

  19. Running for My Life: One Lost Boy’s Journey from the Killing Fields of Sudan to the Olympic Games by Lopez Lomong
    (Thomas Nelson, 2012-07-17, Hardcover)
    Running for My Life is not a story about Africa or track and field athletics. It is about outrunning the devil and achieving the impossible faith, diligence, and the desire to give back. It is the American dream come true and a stark reminder that saving one can help to save thousands more. Lopez Lomong chronicles his inspiring ascent from a barefoot lost boy of the Sudanese Civil War to a Nike sponsored athlete on the US Olympic Team. Though most of us fall somewhere between the catastrophic lows and dizzying highs of Lomong’s incredible life, every reader will find in his story the human spark to pursue dreams that might seem unthinkable, even from circumstances that might appear hopeless. “Lopez Lomong’s story is one of true inspiration. His life is a story of courage, hard work, never giving up, and having hope where there is hopelessness all around. Lopez is a true role model.” ―MICHAEL JOHNSON, Olympic Gold Medalist “This true story of a Sudanese child refugee who became an Olympic star is powerful proof that God gives hope to the hopeless and shines a light in the darkest places. Don’t be surprised if after reading this incredible tale, you find yourself mysteriously drawn to run alongside him.” ―RICHARD STEARNS, president, World Vision US and author of THe Hole in Our Gospel

     

September 2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the upcoming bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. The Cutting Season: A Novel by Attica Locke
    (Harper, 2012-09-18, Hardcover)
    In Black Water Rising, Attica Locke delivered one of the most stunning and sure-handed fiction debuts in recent memory, garnering effusive critical praise, several award nominations, and passionate reader response. Now Locke returns with The Cutting Season, a riveting thriller that intertwines two murders separated across more than a century. Caren Gray manages Belle Vie, a sprawling antebellum plantation that sits between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, where the past and the present coexist uneasily. The estate’s owners have turned the place into an eerie tourist attraction, complete with full-dress re-enactments and carefully restored slave quarters. Outside the gates, a corporation with ambitious plans has been busy snapping up land from struggling families who have been growing sugar cane for generations, and now replacing local employees with illegal laborers. Tensions mount when the body of a female migrant worker is found in a shallow grave on the edge of the property, her throat cut clean. As the investigation gets under way, the list of suspects grows. But when fresh evidence comes to light and the sheriff’s department zeros in on a person of interest, Caren has a bad feeling that the police are chasing the wrong leads. Putting herself at risk, she ventures into dangerous territory as she unearths startling new facts about a very old mystery—the long-ago disappearance of a former slave—that has unsettling ties to the current murder. In pursuit of the truth about Belle Vie’s history and her own, Caren discovers secrets about both cases—ones that an increasingly desperate killer will stop at nothing to keep buried. Taut, hauntingly resonant, and beautifully written, The Cutting Season is at once a thoughtful meditation on how America reckons its past with its future, and a high-octane page-turner that unfolds with tremendous skill and vision. With her rare gift for depicting human nature in all its complexities, Attica Locke demonstrates once again that she is “destined for literary stardom” (Dallas Morning News).

     

  2. Trouble & Triumph: A Novel of Power & Beauty by Tip “T.I.” Harris
    (William Morrow, 2012-09-18, Hardcover)
    Grammy Award-winning hip-hop artist, music producer, and actor T.I. and his bestselling celebrity collaborator, David Ritz, continue the explosive story of Power and Beauty that began in the street-lit epic Power & Beauty. When his mother, Charlotte, was killed, Paul “Power” Clay and his closest friend, Tanya “Beauty” Long, fell under the spell of a savvy and ruthless Atlanta businessman named Slim, who promised to protect them. Wise beyond her years, Beauty always knew that the only person she could rely on was herself. It didn’t take long for the levelheaded young woman to recognize the simmering violence beneath Slim’s street charm. But getting away from him wasn’t easy, and it came at a heartbreaking price: turning her back on Power. Escaping to the glamorous catwalks of the Big Apple, she’s worked her breathtaking good looks and quick wit to build a thriving fashion business. Despite her success, she’s still haunted by the pain of leaving Power behind. Money and new men cannot erase the memory of the true love she denied. To Power, Slim’s world held everything he thought he wanted: women, wealth, power, authority. He discovered too late that Slim Simmons isn’t just a businessman—he’s a ruthless killer who will turn on anyone he thinks is getting in his way. He is the monster who murdered Charlotte. Now, he controls the fate of her only son. But neither Slim nor Power count on Beauty. Like Slim, she is a master who will manipulate, seduce, and sacrifice to get what she wants. She’s never let anything stop her from fulfilling her desires, and she will broker a dangerous bargain to save the only man she’s ever loved. But is saving Power worth sacrificing herself—body and soul? Will his youthful ambitions lead him to redemption—or deeper into the darkness? Will they both become everything they swore they’d never be? A tale of gangstas and sistas, money masters and politicians, that moves across the globe from Paris to New York, Atlanta to Tokyo, the Caribbean to California, Trouble & Triumph is a hip-hop mash-up of loyalty, betrayal, revenge, desire, greed, family, politics, and absolution—and of two unforgettable young star-crossed lovers from the streets who will risk everything for their dreams . . . and for each other.

     

  3. The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America by Edward J. Blum
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2012-09-21, Hardcover)
    How is it that in America the image of Jesus Christ has been used both to justify the atrocities of white supremacy and to inspire the righteousness of civil rights crusades? In The Color of Christ, Edward J. Blum and Paul Harvey weave a tapestry of American dreams and visions–from witch hunts to web pages, Harlem to Hollywood, slave cabins to South Park, Mormon revelations to Indian reservations–to show how Americans remade the Son of God visually time and again into a sacred symbol of their greatest aspirations, deepest terrors, and mightiest strivings for racial power and justice. The Color of Christ uncovers how, in a country founded by Puritans who destroyed depictions of Jesus, Americans came to believe in the whiteness of Christ. Some envisioned a white Christ who would sanctify the exploitation of Native Americans and African Americans and bless imperial expansion. Many others gazed at a messiah, not necessarily white, who was willing and able to confront white supremacy. The color of Christ still symbolizes America’s most combustible divisions, revealing the power and malleability of race and religion from colonial times to the presidency of Barack Obama.

     

  4. Every Little Thing: Based on the song ‘Three Little Birds’ by Bob Marley by Bob Marley
    (Chronicle Books, 2012-09-12, Hardcover)
    Bob Marley’s songs are known the world over for their powerful message of love, peace, and harmony. Now a whole new generation can discover one of his most joyous songs in this reassuring picture book adaptation written by his daughter Cedella and exuberantly illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton. This upbeat story reminds children that the sun will always come out after the rain and mistakes are easily forgiven with a hug. Every family will relate to this universal story of one boy who won’t let anything get him down, as long as he has the help of three very special little birds. Including all the lyrics of the original song plus new verses, this cheerful book will bring a smile to faces of all ages—because every little thing’s gonna be all right!

     

  5. A Gangster and A Gentleman by Kiki Swinson
    (Dafina, 2012-09-25, Paperback)

     

  6. Murder Was the Case by Kiki Swinson
    (Melodrama Pub, 2012-09-18, Paperback)

     

  7. Surrender to a Donovan (Kimani Romance) by A.C. Arthur
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    Sean Donovan is a man on a mission—to discover who is behind the popular relationship column that has transformed his family-owned magazine into Miami’s hippest glossy. But Tate Dennison isn’t the sassy columnist the hardworking bachelor expected. Nor is he prepared for the flash fire of passion the stunning single mother arouses.…The hunky magazine executive wants to mix business with pleasure, but Tate has one hard and fast rule: never fall for the boss! The once-burned advice columnist has no intention of becoming the devastatingly attractive playboy’s latest conquest. But what woman can resist Sean’s charms? Once she’s sampled his kisses, can Tate protect her heart—even when a sabotage plot threatens the Donovan empire and their possible future together?

     

  8. My Destiny (Arabesque) by Adrianne Byrd
    (Harlequin Kimani Arabesque, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    When it comes to matchmaking, will two longtime friends put their relationship on the line for the sake of love?For ten years lawyer Destiny Brockman saw her carefree—but very, very fine—neighbor Miles Stafford as just a good friend. After all, she was totally focused on her career and he was the type of brother who put the P in player. So when she swore up and down that there were no good men in Atlanta, Miles proposes a friendly wager. They would set each other up on a date with the perfect match. But the undeniable attraction between them that’s been simmering for years could put Destiny in danger of losing the bet…and winning the sweetest reward.

     

  9. Divine Intervention (Hallelujah Love) by Lutishia Lovely
    (Dafina, 2012-09-25, Paperback)

     

  10. Seduction’s Shift (Shadow Shifters) by A.C. Arthur
    (St. Martin’s Paperbacks, 2012-09-25, Mass Market Paperback)
    Seduction’s Shift A.C. Arthur They hide their true nature from the world—part man and part animal—sworn to defend the human race against the untamed beasts among them… She was his first love, his only love. But trying to rescue his beautiful Ary from captivity is one wild risk no man should take. Luckily, Nick Delgado is no ordinary man. His work in the urban jungle as a high-powered litigator has only fueled his ferocity, enflamed his passion—and sharpened his claws—to protect his mate. Ary is a born healer who has devoted her life to the tribe—and her heart to Nick. But when the fierce  and sadistic Sabar turns his jaguar eyes upon her, Ary becomes the unwilling pawn in a deadly game of shifting alliances. One man wants to use her talents to enslave humanity. The other wants to free her from their natural enemy. If Nick hopes to save Ary, he must unleash the beast within—and fight for the woman he loves…

     

  11. The Fire of Freedom: Abraham Galloway and the Slaves’ Civil War by David S. Cecelski
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2012-09-29, Hardcover)
    Abraham H. Galloway (1837-70) was a fiery young slave rebel, radical abolitionist, and Union spy who rose out of bondage to become one of the most significant and stirring black leaders in the South during the Civil War. Throughout his brief, mercurial life, Galloway fought against slavery and injustice. He risked his life behind enemy lines, recruited black soldiers for the North, and fought racism in the Union army’s ranks. He also stood at the forefront of an African American political movement that flourished in the Union-occupied parts of North Carolina, even leading a historic delegation of black southerners to the White House to meet with President Lincoln and to demand the full rights of citizenship. He later became one of the first black men elected to the North Carolina legislature. Long hidden from history, Galloway’s story reveals a war unfamiliar to most of us. As David Cecelski writes, “Galloway’s Civil War was a slave insurgency, a war of liberation that was the culmination of generations of perseverance and faith.” This riveting portrait illuminates Galloway’s life and deepens our insight into the Civil War and Reconstruction as experienced by African Americans in the South.

     

  12. Pym: A Novel by Mat Johnson
    (Spiegel & Grau, 2012-09-04, Paperback)
    “THE SHARPEST AND MOST UNUSUAL STORY I READ LAST YEAR . . . [Mat] Johnson’s satirical vision roves as freely as Kurt Vonnegut’s and is colored with the same sort of passionate humanitarianism.”—Maud Newton, New York Times MagazineNAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • Vanity Fair • Houston Chronicle • The Seattle Times • Salon • National Post • The A.V. Club  Recently canned professor of American literature Chris Jaynes has just made a startling discovery: the manuscript of a crude slave narrative that confirms the reality of Edgar Allan Poe’s strange and only novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. Determined to seek out Tsalal, the remote island of pure and utter blackness that Poe describes, Jaynes convenes an all-black crew of six to follow Pym’s trail to the South Pole, armed with little but the firsthand account from which Poe derived his seafaring tale, a bag of bones, and a stash of Little Debbie snack cakes. Thus begins an epic journey by an unlikely band of adventurers under the permafrost of Antarctica, beneath the surface of American history, and behind one of literature’s great mysteries.   “Outrageously entertaining, [Pym] brilliantly re-imagines and extends Edgar Allan Poe’s enigmatic and unsettling Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. . . . Part social satire, part meditation on race in America, part metafiction and, just as important, a rollicking fantasy adventure . . . reminiscent of Philip Roth in its seemingly effortless blend of the serious, comic and fantastic.”—Michael Dirda, The Washington Post“Blisteringly funny.”—Laura Miller, Salon“Relentlessly entertaining.”—The New York Times Book Review “Imagine Kurt Vonnegut having a beer with Ralph Ellison and Jules Verne.”—Vanity Fair “Screamingly funny . . . Reading Pym is like opening a big can of whoop-ass and then marveling—gleefully—at all the mayhem that ensues.”—Houston Chronicle

     

  13. Ancient Nubia: African Kingdoms on the Nile by
    (The American University in Cairo Press, 2012-09-06, Hardcover)
    For most of the modern world, ancient Nubia seems an unknown and enigmatic land. Only a handful of archaeologists have studied its history or unearthed the Nubian cities, temples, and cemeteries that once dotted the landscape of southern Egypt and northern Sudan. Nubia’s remote setting in the midst of an inhospitable desert, with access by river blocked by impassable rapids, has lent it not only an air of mystery, but also isolated it from exploration. Over the past century, particularly during this last generation, scholars have begun to focus more attention on the fascinating cultures of ancient Nubia, ironically prompted by the construction of large dams that have flooded vast tracts of the ancient land.This book attempts to document some of what has recently been discovered about ancient Nubia, with its remarkable history, architecture, and culture, and thereby to give us a picture of this rich, but unfamiliar, African legacy.

     

  14. Between Heaven and Here by Susan Straight
    (McSweeney’s, 2012-09-12, Hardcover)
    In August in Rio Seco, California, the ground is too hard to bury a body. But Glorette Picard is dead, and across the canal, out in the orange groves, they’ll gather shovels and pickaxes and soak the dirt until they can lay her coffin down. First, someone needs to find her son Victor, who memorizes SAT words to avoid the guys selling rock, and someone needs to tell her uncle Enrique, who will be the one to hunt down her killer, and someone needs to brush out her perfect crown of hair and paint her cracked toenails. As the residents of this dry-creek town prepare to bury their own, it becomes clear that Glorette’s life and death are deeply entangled with the dark history of the city and the untouchable beauty that, finally, killed her.

     

  15. Living Color: The Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color by Nina G. Jablonski
    (University of California Press, 2012-09-27, Hardcover)
    Living Color is the first book to investigate the social history of skin color from prehistory to the present, showing how our body’s most visible trait influences our social interactions in profound and complex ways. In a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion, Nina G. Jablonski begins with the biology and evolution of skin pigmentation, explaining how skin color changed as humans moved around the globe. She explores the relationship between melanin pigment and sunlight, and examines the consequences of rapid migrations, vacations, and other lifestyle choices that can create mismatches between our skin color and our environment.Richly illustrated, this book explains why skin color has come to be a biological trait with great social meaning– a product of evolution perceived by culture. It considers how we form impressions of others, how we create and use stereotypes, how negative stereotypes about dark skin developed and have played out through history–including being a basis for the transatlantic slave trade. Offering examples of how attitudes about skin color differ in the U.S., Brazil, India, and South Africa, Jablonski suggests that a knowledge of the evolution and social importance of skin color can help eliminate color-based discrimination and racism.

     

  16. Lesson in Romance (Kimani Romance) by Harmony Evans
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    Alex Dovington is a man with a secret. The internationally famous jazz musician never learned to read. If the world—and his legions of fans—knew, it would be a disaster. When he learns Cara Williams has been hired to teach him, he is reluctant to follow the plan. The sultry teacher will be given only three days to teach the music legend everything she knows. But the instructor becomes the student when Alex turns their mountaintop classroom into a sensual duet of passion.Cara will do anything to keep the doors of her Harlem literacy center open. Even tutor the scandalously handsome saxophone player at his romantic weekend retreat. Alex may be schooling her in the fine art of lovemaking, but Cara has her own secret—one that could tear them apart forever.…

     

  17. After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa by Douglas Foster
    (Liveright, 2012-09-10, Hardcover)
    The most important historical and journalistic portrait to date of a teetering nation whose destiny will determine the fate of a continent.A brutally honest exposé, After Mandela provides a sobering portrait of a country caught between a democratic future and a political meltdown. Recent works have focused primarily on Nelson Mandela’s transcendent story. But Douglas Foster, a leading South Africa authority with early, unprecedented access to President Zuma and to the next generation in the Mandela family, traces the nation’s entire post-apartheid arc, from its celebrated beginnings under “Madiba” to Thabo Mbeki’s tumultuous rule to the ferocious battle between Mbeki and Jacob Zuma. Foster tells this story not only from the point of view of the emerging black elite but also, drawing on hundreds of rare interviews over a six-year period, from the perspectives of ordinary citizens, including an HIV-infected teenager living outside Johannesburg and a homeless orphan in Cape Town. This is the long-awaited, revisionist account of a country whose recent history has been not just neglected but largely ignored by the West. 8 pages of illustrations

     

  18. Champagne Kisses (Kimani Romance) by Zuri Day
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    An heir to Southern California’s most fabled vineyard, Donovan Drake works as hard as he plays. Betrayed by love in the past, the consummate bachelor prides himself on never committing to one woman. But Marissa Hayes isn’t just any woman. And Donovan has just two weeks to show the guarded, voluptuous beauty exactly what she’s been missing.…Falling for her boss is number one on Marissa’s list of don’ts. But from the moment she experiences Donovan’s intoxicating touch, her heart tells her something else. Slowly but surely, his seduction is breaking down her defenses. Is their passion as fleeting as her brief stay at Donovan’s fabulous resort? Or have they found a love as timeless as the finest wine—strong enough to withstand anything, even a threat from Marissa’s past?

     

  19. Evidence of Desire (Kimani Romance) by Pamela Yaye
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-09-18, Mass Market Paperback)
    Azure Ellison may have undergone a total makeover, but she never expects to be romanced by Harper Hamilton, her former prep school friend. The ambitious journalist is after a career-making story about Harper’s powerful Philadelphia family. But the charismatic attorney wants something from Azure in return: her vow to become his lawful wife in a marriage of convenience!Harper can’t believe the girl he once knew has transformed into this stunning, successful beauty. The longtime bachelor has his own reasons for proposing, but Azure has awakened a desire he’s determined to consummate. With the paparazzi eager for the wedding of the year, Harper is ready to start his honeymoon. Until a breaking scandal about the Hamilton dynasty threatens his marriage to the woman he now wants to have and to hold forever…

     

  20. One Day I Will Write About This Place: A Memoir by Binyavanga Wainaina
    (Graywolf Press, 2012-09-04, Paperback)
    “A Kenyan Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man . . . suffused by a love affair with language.”—Publishers Weekly, Top Ten Books of 2011In this vivid and compelling memoir, Binyavanga Wainaina tumbles through his middle-class Kenyan childhood out of kilter with the world around him. In One Day I Will Write About This Place, named a 2011 New York Times notable book, Wainaina brilliantly evokes family, tribe, and nationhood in joyous, ecstatic language.

     

July 2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the bestsellers for African American books that came out in July 2012 (from Amazon.com).

  1. She Was A Friend of Mine by Jasheem Wilson
    (Unique Entertainments, 2012-07-24, Kindle Edition)
    Scheyenne Iverson was as normal a girl could be growing up in East Palo Alto until her thirteenth birthday. As a present she receives a dead family and a missing brother who mysteriously vanished around the same time the fire consumed her family. Shi battles with love, depression, friendship, betrayal and grief in this tale of revenge. When Shi snaps and decides to be a victim no more. She soon finds herself in the middle of the drug game married to the man who just might have killed her family. A victim of the streets Shi refuses to be next. With no one other than her best friend who’s been with her since birth Shi finds out the hard way why it’s wise to keep your enemies close…and your friends closer?

     

  2. Unfaithful (Krystal) by Soweto Satir
    (Brothahood Entertainment, 2012-07-14, Kindle Edition)
    Krystal is back, she’s older, smarter, wiser and her son is growing up. Can he save his mother from a life behind bars? Can he hold his family together? Love, intrigue, betrayal….nobody could predict the way this book comes to an end!

     

  3. The Corruption Chronicles: Obama’s Big Secrecy, Big Corruption, and Big Government by Tom Fitton
    (Threshold Editions, 2012-07-24, Hardcover)
    In 2008, Barack Obama made a promise to have the “most transparent administration” of any U.S. president; it was the very cornerstone of his campaign. No secrets. No masks. No smoke and mirrors. No excuses. But over the next four years, President Obama’s administration would prove to be one of the most guarded and duplicitous of our time. Tom Fitton of Judicial Watch, America’s largest nonpartisan government watchdog (challenging George W. Bush as well as Bill Clinton), has been investigating Obama ever since he splashed onto the national scene in 2006. Now Fitton exposes devastating secrets the Obama administration has desperately fought—even in court—to keep from the American public. For a while, the Obama stonewall seemed to be holding. Until now. And the revelations are astonishing.

     

  4. The Mercy Seat (The Freedom Baptist Trilogy) by Alvetta Rolle
    (Ellechor Publishing House, LLC, 2012-07-02, Kindle Edition)
    Going from raunchy to redeemed is not easy. When 19 year old prostitute Sofia Douglas walks into Freedom Baptist to reconcile with her mentally abusive foster mother Julia Aaron, she is met with much more than she bargained for.Although befriended by an elderly church mother by the name of Ruth Stills, she begins to fall for Ruth’s son Xavier who is handsome, caring, a minister… and married. Sofia begins an endless cycle of trying to stifle mutual feelings for a married man of God, and combat the bitterness of a mother who has her own issues, both spiritually and psychologically.With the arrival of the mysterious Sofia walks at the last night of revival, Xavier Stills and Felecia’s already troubled marriage takes a tumultuous turn for the worst. Felecia and Xavier now have to fight to save their diminishing relationship, even as they try to ward off the temptation of yielding to outside influences.

     

  5. The Communist by Paul Kengor
    (Mercury Ink, 2012-07-17, Hardcover)
    In his memoir, Barack Obama omits the full name of his mentor, simply calling him “Frank.” Now, the truth is out: Never has a figure as deeply troubling and controversial as Frank Marshall Davis had such an impact on the development of an American president. Although other radical influences on Obama, from Jeremiah Wright to Bill Ayers, have been scrutinized, the public knows little about Davis, a card-carrying member of the Communist Party USA, cited by the Associated Press as an “important influence” on Obama, one whom he “looked to” not merely for “advice on living” but as a “father” figure.

     

  6. Dream Team: How Michael, Magic, Larry, Charles, and the Greatest Team of All Time Conquered the World and Changed the Game of Basketball Forever by Jack McCallum
    (Ballantine Books, 2012-07-10, Hardcover)
    They were the Beatles of basketball, the Mercury Seven in sneakers.   In Dream Team, acclaimed sports journalist Jack McCallum delivers the untold story of the greatest team ever assembled: the 1992 U.S. Olympic Men’s Basketball Team that captivated the world, kindled the hoop dreams of countless children around the planet, and remade the NBA into a global sensation.   As a senior staff writer for Sports Illustrated, McCallum enjoyed a courtside seat for the most exciting basketball spectacle on earth, covering the Dream Team from its inception to the gold medal ceremony in Barcelona. For the duration of the Olympics, he lived with, golfed with, and—most important—drank with some of the greatest players of the NBA’s Golden Age: Magic Johnson, the ebullient showman who shrugged off his recent diagnosis of HIV to become the team’s unquestioned captain and leader; Michael Jordan, the transcendent talent at the height of his powers as a player—and a marketing juggernaut; and Charles Barkley, the outspoken iconoclast whose utterances on and off the court threatened to ignite an international incident.

     

  7. Ski Mask Gang by Boo Jackson
    (2012-07-27, Kindle Edition)
    Nasir has been friends with Desmond and Damon since high school. They chased girls together, played sports together, and committed robberies together. Knocking over convenience stores was the thing to do when they were kids, but greed caused them to raise the stakes and attempt to knock over a bank. As the saying goes “There’s no honor amongst thieves.” Come take a look into the lives of these three young men and see just how true that statement is.

     

  8. With This Kiss (Welcome to Nottoway) by Candice Poarch
    (Candice Poarch, 2012-07-03, Kindle Edition)
    When Phoenix Dye returns to Nottoway, Virginia, after an eleven year absence, little did he know that the bothersome triplets who live across the road from him are his children by the only woman he has ever loved.Karina Wallace once believed in love, too, but all that changed after that one incredible summer spent with Phoenix. He disappeared without a trace, leaving her pregnant and alone. Now he’s back and she’s torn between telling him the truth or leaving things as they are. She feels Phoenix will only be in town for a short time. Why let the triplets fall in love with him only to be heartbroken when he leaves? But when she is blackmailed, will she be forced to tell him the truth?

     

  9. They Call Me…Montey Greene (The Montey Greene Action Thriller Series) by A.R. Yoba
    (GhettoSuburbia Entertainment, 2012-07-03, Kindle Edition)
    WHO IS MONTEY GREENE? WHY DOES EVERYBODY WANT TO KNOW HIS NAME THEN WANT HIM DEAD?

     

  10. Already Taken by Love Lee
    (Dahl House Publications, 2012-07-08, Kindle Edition)
    Being the wifey of a dope boy is no easy task, just ask Fallon Hall. Late nights, early mornings, and broken promises were all that she’d ever known with Cash. Fed up with feeling like the mistress while the streets were his main chick, she broke things off with him. Now a year later, Fallon still can’t get Cash out of her head and neither could he. A chance encounter with Cash reveals that he is finally ready to make his exit from the streets and marry the woman of his dreams. There’s only one rift in their fairytale ever after…What do you do when the woman you love is already taken by your older brother?

     

  11. The Sandcastle Girls: A Novel by Chris Bohjalian
    (Doubleday, 2012-07-17, Hardcover)
    The Sandcastle Girls is a sweeping historical love story steeped in Chris Bohjalian’s Armenian heritage.When Elizabeth Endicott arrives in Aleppo, Syria she has a diploma from Mount Holyoke, a crash course in nursing,  and only the most basic grasp of the Armenian language.  The year is 1915 and she has volunteered on behalf of the Boston-based Friends of Armenia to help deliver food and medical aid to refugees of the Armenian genocide.  There Elizabeth becomes friendly with Armen, a young Armenian engineer who has already lost his wife and infant daughter.  When Armen leaves Aleppo and travels south into Egypt to join the British army, he begins to write Elizabeth letters, and comes to realize that he has fallen in love with the wealthy, young American woman who is so different from the wife he lost.Fast forward to the present day, where we meet Laura Petrosian, a novelist living in suburban New York.  Although her grandparents’ ornate Pelham home was affectionately nicknamed “The Ottoman Annex,” Laura has never really given her Armenian heritage much thought. But when an old friend calls, claiming to have seen a newspaper photo of Laura’s grandmother promoting an exhibit at a Boston museum, Laura embarks on a journey back through her family’s history that reveals love, loss – and a wrenching secret that has been buried for generations.

     

  12. If I Can’t Have You by Mary B. Morrison
    (Kensington Books, 2012-07-31, Kindle Edition)
    What really makes a man plunge headlong into obsession? And what does he do past the point of no return? New York Times bestselling author Mary B. Morrison delivers a seductive, mesmerizing tale of “love” gone dangerously wrong. . .Madison is my woman. She needs me. This is the mantra Granville Washington constantly repeats to others, including the friends and family who beg him to respect Madison Tyler’s demand that he leave her alone. Sure, Granville knows they’re as different as can be. He’s a construction worker, ball-and-chained to the Houston grid, while brilliant, beautiful Madison runs her own multi-million dollar company. But he also knows she can’t resist the way he kisses every inch of her just right. After only three months, Granville is sure she’s everything he desires in a wife. If Madison only knew the real him, she’d realize they belong together. And he’ll do anything to make her his. Forever. What part of “I’m not in a relationship with you,” didn’t Granville understand? No matter how direct Madison is, Granville just doesn’t get it. He was fine when it came to putting in overtime burning up the sheets, but that’s where their connection ends–or so she thinks. Once the stalking begins, Madison files a police report. She’s determined to take her life back. But once she moves on for real, Granville has a surprise for her. . .when she least expects it. Madison is about to discover just how far he will go to have and to hold her. Whether she wants him or not.

     

July 2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the upcoming bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. Checkmate – The Baddest Chick by Nisa Santiago
    (Melodrama Publishing, 2012-07-03, Paperback)
    The Baddest Chick Motto: Your time at the top is short-lived. Enjoy it while you can. Kola, the reigning Queen of New York, has Harlem on lock and is making paper hand over fist. If the stresses of hustling hard weren’t enough, the love of her life is mixed up with a Brooklyn chick, a bounty has been put on her head for a hit she didn’t sanction, and her sister’s ex-man, Chico, is trying to rock her to sleep. Kola has 99 problems, but Apple ain’t one. Apple, gone but not forgotten while trapped in a Mexican hellhole, is still the most hated chick in New York. She’s low on friends and can’t seem to climb back up on her pedestal. With revenge in her heart and murder on her mind, Apple attempts to overcome her situation just in time to reclaim her title as The Baddest Chick the world has ever seen.

     

  2. The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln by Stephen L. Carter
    (Knopf, 2012-07-10, Hardcover)
    From the best-selling author of The Emperor of Ocean Park and New England White, a daring reimagining of one of the most tumultuous moments in our nation’s past   Stephen L. Carter’s thrilling new novel takes as its starting point an alternate history: President Abraham Lincoln survives the assassination attempt at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. Two years later he is charged with overstepping his constitutional authority, both during and after the Civil War, and faces an impeachment trial . . . Twenty-one-year-old Abigail Canner is a young black woman with a degree from Oberlin, a letter of employment from the law firm that has undertaken Lincoln’s defense, and the iron-strong conviction, learned from her late mother, that “whatever limitations society might place on ordinary negroes, they would never apply to her.” And so Abigail embarks on a life that defies the norms of every stratum of Washington society: working side by side with a white clerk, meeting the great and powerful of the nation, including the president himself.  But when Lincoln’s lead counsel is found brutally murdered on the eve of the trial, Abigail is plunged into a treacherous web of intrigue and conspiracy reaching the highest levels of the divided government. Here is a vividly imagined work of historical fiction that captures the emotional tenor of post–Civil War America, a brilliantly realized courtroom drama that explores the always contentious question of the nature of presidential authority, and a galvanizing story of political suspense.

     

  3. Murderville 2: The Epidemic (Murderville Trilogy) by Ashley Coleman
    (Cash Money Content, 2012-07-24, Paperback)
    New York Times best-selling authors Ashley & JaQuavis are back with the second installment in the epic Murderville Series. Love, murder, loyalty, and money fill this hood tale as they continue this international street saga. With Samad’s target on her back, Liberty must survive the harsh streets alone. but when a chance encounter pushes her into the arms of a new friend, Po, the two take on the California kingpin and step full force into the game. As bullets and sparks fly, the unlikely pair embark on a serendipitous journey back to where it all started, Sierra Leone. With a new overseas connection, Po sees an opportunity that is too good to pass up. When his pursuit of the American dream conflicts with Liberty’s past, will they be able to survive? Or will the drug empire that they’ve built together come crashing down?

     

  4. Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America by Tanner Colby
    (Viking Adult, 2012-07-05, Hardcover)
    An incisive and candid look at how America got lost on the way to Dr. King’s Promised LandAlmost fifty years after Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, equality is the law of the land, but actual integration is still hard to find. Mammoth battles over forced busing, unfair housing practices, and affirmative action have hardly helped. The bleak fact is that black people and white people in the United States don’t spend much time together—at work, school, church, or anywhere. Tanner Colby, himself a child of a white-flight Southern suburb, set out to discover why.Some of My Best Friends Are Black chronicles America’s troubling relationship with race through four interrelated stories: the transformation of a once-racist Birmingham school system; a Kansas City neighborhood’s fight against housing discrimination; the curious racial divide of the Madison Avenue ad world; and a Louisiana Catholic parish’s forty-year effort to build an integrated church. Writing with a reporter’s nose and a stylist’s flair, Colby uncovers the deep emotional fault lines set trembling by race and takes an unflinching look at an America still struggling to reach the mountaintop.

     

  5. The Expendable Man (New York Review Books Classics) by Dorothy B. Hughes, afterword by Walter Mosley
    (NYRB Classics, 2012-07-03, Paperback)
    “It was surprising what old experiences remembered could do to a presumably educated, civilized man.” And Hugh Denismore, a young doctor driving his mother’s Cadillac from Los Angeles to Phoenix, is eminently educated and civilized. He is privileged, would seem to have the world at his feet, even. Then why does the sight of a few redneck teenagers disconcert him? Why is he reluctant to pick up a disheveled girl hitchhiking along the desert highway? And why is he the first person the police suspect when she is found dead in Arizona a few days later?Dorothy B. Hughes ranks with Raymond Chandler and Patricia Highsmith as a master of mid-century noir. In books like In a Lonely Place and Ride the Pink Horse she exposed a seething discontent underneath the veneer of twentieth-century prosperity. With The Expendable Man, first published in 1963, Hughes upends the conventions of the wrong-man narrative to deliver a story that engages readers even as it implicates them in the greatest of all American crimes.

     

  6. Snow-Storm in August: Washington City, Francis Scott Key, and the Forgotten Race Riot of 1835 by Jefferson Morley
    (Nan A. Talese, 2012-07-03, Hardcover)
    A gripping narrative history of the explosive events that drew together Francis Scott Key, Andrew Jackson, and an 18-year-old slave on trial for attempted murder. In 1835, the city of Washington pulsed with change. As newly freed African Americans from the South poured in, free blacks outnumbered slaves for the first time. Radical notions of abolishing slavery circulated on the city’s streets, and white residents were forced to confront new ideas of what the nation’s future might look like.On the night of August 4th, Arthur Bowen, an eighteen-year-old slave, stumbled into the bedroom where his owner, Anna Thornton, slept. He had an ax in the crook of his arm. An alarm was raised, and he ran away. Word of the incident spread rapidly, and within days, Washington’s first race riot exploded, as whites fearing a slave rebellion attacked the property of the free blacks. Residents dubbed the event the “Snow-Storm,” in reference to the central role of Beverly Snow, a flamboyant former slave turned successful restaurateur, who became the target of the mob’s rage.In the wake of the riot came two sensational criminal trials that gripped the city. Prosecuting both cases was none other than Francis Scott Key, a politically ambitious attorney famous for writing the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner,” who few now remember served as the city’s district attorney for eight years. Key defended slavery until the twilight’s last gleaming, and pandered to racial fears by seeking capital punishment for Arthur Bowen. But in a surprise twist his prosecution was thwarted by Arthur’s ostensible victim, Anna Thornton, a respected socialite who sought the help of President Andrew Jackson.Ranging beyond the familiar confines of the White House and the Capitol, Snow-Storm in August delivers readers into an unknown chapter of American history with a textured and absorbing account of the racial secrets and contradictions that coursed beneath the freewheeling capital of a rising world power.”Snow-Storm in August is the sort of book I most love to read: history so fresh it feels alive, yet introducing me to a time and place that I had little known or utterly misunderstood. After reading Jefferson Morley’s vibrant account, one can never hear ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ the same way again.”—David Maraniss, author of Barack Obama: The Story

     

  7. When Sunday Comes Again by Terry E. Hill
    (Kensington, 2012-07-01, Paperback)

     

  8. Tell Me No Secrets by Nikki Michelle
    (Kensington, 2012-07-01, Paperback)

     

  9. Beautiful, Dirty, Rich: A Novel by J. D. Mason
    (St. Martin’s Press, 2012-07-03, Hardcover)
    A gripping new novel from bestselling author J.D. Mason about a wealthy Texas family and the one woman who holds— and will reveal—all their dirty secrets  Desdimona Green has been the name on everyone’s lips in Blink, Texas. Twenty-five years ago, at the age of eighteen, she shot and killed one of the wealthiest men and pillars of the community, oil baron Julian Gatewood. The Gatewood family was considered untouchable, so the whole state of Texas was rocked to its core over Julian’s murder. They were even more shocked to discover that Desi is Julian’s daughter and her mother had been his lover for years. But when Desi gets out of jail and promptly inherits millions from Julian’s estate, everyone knows that there is much more to the story—and Desi Green is the keeper of the Gatewood secrets, including what happened the night J ulian died. When a famous true crime reporter shows up on her doorstep wanting the full story, Desi agrees to reveal all, much to the horror of the Gatewoods, who will do anything to stop her. But Desi has more than a few tricks up her sleeve…

     

  10. American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America) by Robert O. Self
    (Princeton University Press, 2012-07-01, Paperback)
    As the birthplace of the Black Panthers and a nationwide tax revolt, California embodied a crucial motif of the postwar United States: the rise of suburbs and the decline of cities, a process in which black and white histories inextricably joined. American Babylon tells this story through Oakland and its nearby suburbs, tracing both the history of civil rights and black power politics as well as the history of suburbanization and home-owner politics. Robert Self shows that racial inequities in both New Deal and Great Society liberalism precipitated local struggles over land, jobs, taxes, and race within postwar metropolitan development. Black power and the tax revolt evolved together, in tension.American Babylon demonstrates that the history of civil rights and black liberation politics in California did not follow a southern model, but represented a long-term struggle for economic rights that began during the World War II years and continued through the rise of the Black Panthers in the late 1960s. This struggle yielded a wide-ranging and profound critique of postwar metropolitan development and its foundation of class and racial segregation. Self traces the roots of the 1978 tax revolt to the 1940s, when home owners, real estate brokers, and the federal government used racial segregation and industrial property taxes to forge a middle-class lifestyle centered on property ownership.Using the East Bay as a starting point, Robert Self gives us a richly detailed, engaging narrative that uniquely integrates the most important racial liberation struggles and class politics of postwar America.

     

  11. Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?: What It Means to Be Black Now by Touré
    (Free Press, 2012-07-10, Paperback)
    In this provocative book, writer and cultural critic Touré explores the concept of Post-Blackness: the ability for someone to be rooted in but not restricted by their race. Drawing on his own experiences and those of 105 luminaries, he argues that racial identity should be understood as fluid, complex, and self-determined.

     

  12. Keeping Score by Regina Hart
    (Kensington, 2012-07-01, Paperback)
    To be a pro b-ball champion takes endless drive and passion. But being a winner on the court can often mean losing off the court. . .He’s an NBA legend, considered the best of the best. Now veteran player Warrick Evans is determined to lead his team all the way to the championship. It’s his last shot before he retires, but the media can’t get enough of his story–and all the attention is turning his teammates against him, not to mention his wife. . .Dr. Marilyn Devry-Evans has always stood by her man, even when it meant standing in his shadow. Now she wants to focus on her own career, and on scoring her own dream job. But with the spotlight bearing down on them, Marilyn is reaching her breaking point. Especially when a secret comes to light–one that could destroy not only her career, but her marriage. . . Praise for Regina Hart”Sexy, fun, and fast-paced. . .a slam dunk!” –Kate Angell on Fast Break

     

  13. Sites of Slavery: Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post–Civil Rights Imagination by Salamishah Tillet
    (Duke University Press Books, 2012-07-19, Paperback)
    More than forty years after the major victories of the civil rights movement, African Americans have a vexed relation to the civic myth of the United States as the land of equal opportunity and justice for all. In Sites of Slavery Salamishah Tillet examines how contemporary African American artists and intellectuals – including Annette Gordon-Reed, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Bill T. Jones, Carrie Mae Weems, and Kara Walker – turn to the subject of slavery in order to understand and challenge the ongoing exclusion of African Americans from the founding narratives of the United States. She explains how they reconstruct “sites of slavery” – contested figures, events, memories, locations, and experiences related to chattel slavery – such as the allegations of a sexual relationship between Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings, the characters Uncle Tom and Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, African American tourism to slave forts in Ghana and Senegal, and the legal challenges posed by reparations movements. By claiming and recasting these sites of slavery, contemporary artists and intellectuals provide slaves with an interiority and subjectivity denied them in American history, register the civic estrangement experienced by African Americans in the post-civil rights era, and envision a more fully realized American democracy.

     

  14. Floyd Patterson: The Fighting Life of Boxing’s Invisible Champion by W. K. Stratton
    (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012-07-10, Hardcover)
    A well-researched and overdue tribute. Like one of Patterson’s reliable left hooks, Stratton sharply recounts the life of an important, but often forgotten, two-time world heavyweight champion. — Gary Andrew Poole, author of PacMan: Behind the Scenes with Manny PacquiaoIn 1956, Floyd Patterson became, at age twenty-one, the youngest boxer to claim the title of world heavyweight champion. Later, he was the first ever to lose and regain that honor. Here, the acclaimed author W. K. Stratton chronicles the life of “the Gentle Gladiator” — an athlete overshadowed by Ali’s theatrics and Liston’s fearsome reputation, and a civil rights activist overlooked in the Who’s Who of race politics. From the Gramercy Gym and wildcard manager Cus D’Amato to the final rematch against Ali in 1972, Patterson’s career spanned boxing’s golden age. He won an Olympic gold medal, had bouts with Marciano and Johansson, and was interviewed by James Baldwin, Gay Talese, and Budd Schulberg. A complex, misunderstood figure — he once kissed an opponent at the end of a match — he was known for his peekaboo stance and soft-spoken nature. Floyd Patterson was boxing’s invisible champion, but in this deeply researched and beautifully written biography he comes vividly to life and is finally given his due — as one of the most artful boxers of his time and as one of our great sportsmen, a man who shaped the world in and out of the ring.

     

  15. White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America) by Kevin M. Kruse
    (Princeton University Press, 2012-07-01, Paperback)
    During the civil rights era, Atlanta thought of itself as “The City Too Busy to Hate,” a rare place in the South where the races lived and thrived together. Over the course of the 1960s and 1970s, however, so many whites fled the city for the suburbs that Atlanta earned a new nickname: “The City Too Busy Moving to Hate.”In this reappraisal of racial politics in modern America, Kevin Kruse explains the causes and consequences of “white flight” in Atlanta and elsewhere. Seeking to understand segregationists on their own terms, White Flight moves past simple stereotypes to explore the meaning of white resistance. In the end, Kruse finds that segregationist resistance, which failed to stop the civil rights movement, nevertheless managed to preserve the world of segregation and even perfect it in subtler and stronger forms.Challenging the conventional wisdom that white flight meant nothing more than a literal movement of whites to the suburbs, this book argues that it represented a more important transformation in the political ideology of those involved. In a provocative revision of postwar American history, Kruse demonstrates that traditional elements of modern conservatism, such as hostility to the federal government and faith in free enterprise, underwent important transformations during the postwar struggle over segregation. Likewise, white resistance gave birth to several new conservative causes, like the tax revolt, tuition vouchers, and privatization of public services. Tracing the journey of southern conservatives from white supremacy to white suburbia, Kruse locates the origins of modern American politics.

     

  16. The Other Side of Goodness by Vanessa Davis Griggs
    (Dafina, 2012-07-31, Paperback)

     

May 2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the upcoming bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. The Reverend’s Wife (A Reverend Curtis Black Novel) by Kimberla Lawson Roby
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2012-05-01, Kindle Edition)
    From New York Times bestselling author Kimberla Lawson Roby comes the ninth installment in her award-winning Reverend Curtis Black series. It’s been months since Reverend Curtis learned that his wife Charlotte had affairs with two different men, and for now, he continues to be cordial and respectful to her. But he’s also made it clear that once their son Matthew graduates high school, he will be filing for divorce. Charlotte, on the other hand, continues to do everything possible to make amends in hopes of saving their marriage. Unfortunately, Curtis is ready to move on and is being propositioned by a woman who desperately wants to become the next Mrs. Curtis Black. When the situation heads down a path that is frighteningly shocking, could it be the final blow to this once blessed union?

     

  2. Home by Toni Morrison
    (Knopf, 2012-05-08, Hardcover)
    America’s most celebrated novelist, Nobel Prize-winner Toni Morrison extends her profound take on our history with this twentieth-century tale of redemption: a taut and tortured story about one man’s desperate search for himself in a world disfigured by war.Frank Money is an angry, self-loathing veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. His home may seem alien to him, but he is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from and that he’s hated all his life. As Frank revisits his memories from childhood and the war that have left him questioning his sense of self, he discovers a profound courage he had thought he could never possess again. A deeply moving novel about an apparently defeated man finding his manhood—and his home.

     

  3. Dopeman: Memoirs of a Snitch: Part 3 of Dopeman’s Trilogy by JaQuavis Coleman
    (Urban Books, 2012-05-01, Paperback)

     

  4. Boss Bitch (Bitch Series) by Deja King
    (A King Production, 2012-05-15, Paperback)
    Precious Cummings and her daughter Aaliyah Mills Carter must protect the family empire as an unknown enemy tries to step in and take the throne. Can mother and daughter get past their differences and unite as one or will they stay at odds and risk having their loved ones torn apart? The saga continues to unfold in Boss Bitch.

     

  5. God Don’t Make No Mistakes (God Don’t Like Ugly) by Mary Monroe
    (Kensington Books, 2012-05-29, Kindle Edition)
    In the sparkling conclusion to Mary Monroe’s bestselling God series, two forever friends face their biggest betrayals yet and learn the hard way that putting your trust in the wrong hands can change your life forever…These days, Annette Goode Davis has a pretty full plate–literally and figuratively. Although she’s trying to reconcile with her husband, Pee Wee, she’s still seeing other men on the side. A woman’s got to cover her bases, right? With her love life hopping, Annette should be as pleased as punch. Instead, the stress has her eating everything in sight and packing on the pounds along the way. Meanwhile, Annette’s best friend, Rhoda O’Toole, has her hands full–as usual–dealing with her wild child daughter. Jade has always been a cross to bear, but when her antics almost cost Rhoda her man, Rhoda throws Jade out on the street. But Jade soon finds a way to make Rhoda regret her choice…. Privately, Annette thanks her lucky stars that her daughter, Charlotte, has her head on straight. And she’s been doubly blessed to have a strait-laced neighbor look after Charlotte when she’s caught up in Pee Wee and Rhoda’s many problems. But when Annette’s world is rocked by a terrible revelation, she’ll discover that appearances can be very, very deceiving–and she’ll have to summon every ounce of strength she has to protect the ones she loves. “Monroe is a masterful storyteller.” –Philadelphia Inquirer

     

  6. Seduced by a Stallion (Kimani Romance) by Deborah Fletcher Mello
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-05-01, Kindle Edition)
    Wealthy Texas scion Matthew Stallion is the playboy of the Western world. In the courtroom, he’s unbeatable. On a horse, he’s unstoppable. And in bed…he’s irresistible. But it may be time for the second eldest Stallion son to hang up his Stetson when he clashes with single mother Katrina Broomes. The widowed judge is the epitome of judicial calm and old-fashioned tradition. Until Matthew unleashes her wild passion.The charismatic, eye-catchingly gorgeous attorney is six feet plus of potent masculinity. Katrina doesn’t stand a chance against Matthew’s sensual onslaught. From the chic boulevards of Paris to the sprawling Stallion family ranch, she’s getting a lesson in seduction—Texan style. Because when it comes to love out West…the sky’s the limit!

     

  7. Always in My Heart (Kimani Romance) by Kayla Perrin
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-05-01, Kindle Edition)
    The oldest of three adopted daughters, Callie Hart has always loved being the protector of the family. But now she is all grown up—with a young son of her own to protect. Callie can’t wait to show him off when she reunites with her two sisters in Ohio. But that also means coming face-to-face with the lover she left behind. Nigel Williams is even more irresistibly attractive than ever. But what will he do when he learns about the secret she kept hidden from him for ten years?Nigel has never forgiven Callie for fleeing Ohio—and the passion they shared. And when she shows up on his doorstep asking for forgiveness, the Cleveland cop is furious at her deception. But how can he deny the feelings Callie reawakens in him? Blindsided once again by the heat of desire, Nigel vows to fight for his future with the woman he has always loved.

     

  8. Natural Born Liar by Noire
    (Dafina, 2012-05-01, Paperback)
    What happens when beautiful, twenty-year-old petty thief and ex-stripper Mink LaRue finds out she’s a dead ringer for the age-progressed photo of the missing oil heiress Sable Dominion?Harlem-born Mink LaRue makes a beeline to Dallas, Texas, pretending to be the Dominion’s long-lost daughter, Sable. She knows she’s hit the jackpot when she and her super ghetto partner in crime, Bowlegged Bunni, are admitted into the Dominion’s 20-room mansion, complete with all the trimmings of a luxurious family estate. But it’s not long before Mink’s newfound siblings grow suspicious of the ghetto princess, who has a rap sheet a mile long. If Mink is to worm her way into their pockets and get her hands on their dough, then she must tell enough lies to convince everyone that she really is the precious daughter who was stolen from their fold. But with a DNA test standing between her and a hefty inheritance, how long can Mink’s bag of lies keep her rolling in the Dominion’s riches? “Urban Erotica has never been hotter!” –Nikki Turner”Noire is Dickens for the age of dojah, donuts and dawgs.” –Publishers Weekly

     

  9. Lost Without You (Kimani Romance) by Yahrah St. John
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-05-01, Kindle Edition)
    As the creative genius behind Georgia’s most fabled cosmetics dynasty, Shane Adams has a legacy to live up to. The freewheeling Atlanta bachelor also knows how to romance a woman, wining and dining the city’s most eligible beauties. Only Gabrielle Burton seems immune to his legendary charms. Yet Shane has never been able to forget his stunning rival, whose sweet desire is like a lingering perfume.…The hunky Adams Cosmetics VP has always held Gabby spellbound. But the workaholic perfumer never thought she could attract the sexy playboy’s attention. Until she undergoes a major makeover. Suddenly she’s on everyone’s A-list…including Shane’s. As intrigue swirls around the company, is the sensual scent of passion leading Gabby and Shane to love?

     

  10. Aloha Fantasy (Kimani Romance) by Devon Vaughn Archer
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-05-01, Kindle Edition)
    Award-winning photographer Danica Austin is the essence of urban chic. But with her love life going nowhere fast, she’s more than ready to swap houses for a month in Hawaii. The minute her plane touches down on exotic Hilo, Danica can’t wait to check out the social scene and catch some breathtaking sunsets. Until gorgeous real estate investor Boyd Reed comes into the picture to stake his claim on the house…and her heart!If this stunning stranger thinks she can just move into Boyd’s jointly owned waterfront property, she can think again! Although he must admit: his temporary tenant is one irresistible woman. Sharing passion under tropical skies is making Boyd believe in the power of love. But Danica’s not sure she wants to make Hawaii her home. If only he can just persuade her to spend the rest of her days and nights with him in their one-of-a-kind island paradise.…

     

  11. The Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Reader by Henry Louis Gates Jr.
    (Basic Civitas Books, 2012-05-01, Hardcover)
    Educator, writer, critic, intellectual, film-maker—Henry Louis Gates, Jr., has been widely praised as being one of America’s most prominent and prolific scholars. In what will be an essential volume, The Henry Louis Gates Reader collects three decades of writings from his many fields of interest and expertise.From his earliest work of literary-historical excavation in 1982, through his current writings on the history and science of African American genealogy, the essays collected here follow his path as historian, theorist, canon-builder, and cultural critic, revealing a thinker of uncommon breadth whose work is uniformly guided by the drive to uncover and restore a history that has for too long been buried and denied.An invaluable reference, The Henry Louis Gates Reader will be a singular reflection of one of our most gifted minds.

     

  12. The Block by Treasure Hernandez
    (Kensington, 2012-05-01, Paperback)

     

  13. Samurai among Panthers: Richard Aoki on Race, Resistance, and a Paradoxical Life (Critical American Studies) by Diane C. Fujino
    (Univ Of Minnesota Press, 2012-05-02, Paperback)
    An iconic figure of the Asian American movement, Richard Aoki (1938–2009) was also, as the most prominent non-Black member of the Black Panther Party, a key architect of Afro-Asian solidarity in the 1960s and ’70s. His life story exposes the personal side of political activism as it illuminates the history of ethnic nationalism and radical internationalism in America.A reflection of this interconnection, Samurai among Panthers weaves together two narratives: Aoki’s dramatic first-person chronicle and an interpretive history by a leading scholar of the Asian American movement, Diane C. Fujino. Aoki’s candid account of himself takes us from his early years in Japanese American internment camps to his political education on the streets of Oakland, to his emergence in the Black Panther Party. As his story unfolds, we see how his parents’ separation inside the camps and his father’s illegal activities shaped the development of Aoki’s politics. Fujino situates his life within the context of twentieth-century history—World War II, the Cold War, and the protests of the 1960s. She demonstrates how activism is both an accidental and an intentional endeavor and how a militant activist practice can also promote participatory democracy and social service.The result of these parallel voices and analysis in Samurai among Panthers is a complex—and sometimes contradictory—portrait of a singularly extraordinary activist and an expansion and deepening of our understanding of the history he lived.

     

  14. From Slave Ship to Harvard: Yarrow Mamout and the History of an African American Family by James H. Johnston
    (Fordham University Press, 2012-05-14, Hardcover)
    From Slave Ship to Harvard is the true story of an African American family in Maryland over six generations. The author has reconstructed a unique narrative of black struggle and achievement from paintings, photographs, books, diaries, court records, legal documents, and oral histories. From Slave Ship to Harvard traces the family from the colonial period and the American Revolution through the Civil War to Harvard and finally today. Yarrow Mamout, the first of the family in America, was an educated Muslim from Guinea. He was brought to Maryland on the slave ship Elijah and gained his freedom forty-four years later. By then, Yarrow had become so well known in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C., that he attracted the attention of the eminent American portrait painter Charles Willson Peale, who captured Yarrow’s visage in the painting that appears on the cover of this book. The author here reveals that Yarrow’s immediate relatives-his sister, niece, wife, and son-were notable in their own right. His son married into the neighboring Turner family, and the farm community in western Maryland called Yarrowsburg was named for Yarrow Mamout’s daughter-in-law, Mary “Polly” Turner Yarrow. The Turner line ultimately produced Robert Turner Ford, who graduated from Harvard University in 1927. Just as Peale painted the portrait of Yarrow, James H. Johnston’s new book puts a face on slavery and paints the history of race in Maryland. It is a different picture from what most of us imagine. Relationships between blacks and whites were far more complex, and the races more dependent on each other. Fortunately, as this one family’s experience shows, individuals of both races repeatedly stepped forward to lessen divisions and to move America toward the diverse society of today.

     

  15. It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership by Colin Powell
    (Harper, 2012-05-22, Hardcover)
    It Worked for Me is filled with vivid experiences and lessons learned that have shaped the legendary public service career of the four-star general and former Secretary of State Colin Powell. At its heart are Powell’s “Thirteen Rules”—notes he gathered over the years and that now form the basis of his leadership presentations given throughout the world. Powell’s short but sweet rules—among them, “Get mad, then get over it” and “Share credit”—are illustrated by revealing personal stories that introduce and expand upon his principles for effective leadership: conviction, hard work, and, above all, respect for others. In work and in life, Powell writes, “it’s about how we touch and are touched by the people we meet. It’s all about the people.” A natural storyteller, Powell offers warm and engaging parables with wise advice on succeeding in the workplace and beyond. “Trust your people,” he counsels as he delegates presidential briefing responsibilities to two junior State Department desk officers. “Do your best—someone is watching,” he advises those just starting out, recalling his own teenage summer job mopping floors in a soda-bottling factory. Powell combines the insights he has gained serving in the top ranks of the military and in four presidential administrations with the lessons he’s learned from his immigrant-family upbringing in the Bronx, his training in the ROTC, and his growth as an Army officer. The result is a powerful portrait of a leader who is reflective, self-effacing, and grateful for the contributions of everyone he works with. Colin Powell’s It Worked for Me is bound to inspire, move, and surprise readers. Thoughtful and revealing, it is a brilliant and original blueprint for leadership.

     

  16. The Beautiful Ones (Arabesque) by Adrianne Byrd
    (Harlequin Kimani, 2012-05-22, Mass Market Paperback)
    In a sequel to Unforgettable, successful businesswoman Ophelia Missler has never had time to look for Mr. Right—much less find him. Now she’s engaged to wealthy businessman Jonas Hinton and is about to have the wedding of her dreams. But for some reason, she can’t stop thinking about her longtime best friend, Solomon Bassett. She never suspected that Solomon has secretly adored her for years, and has been unable to tell her how he really feels. Now, with their friendship and future in the balance, Solomon and Ophelia will have to listen to their hearts and dare to follow, if they are ever going to discover an everlasting love.

     

  17. Kehinde Wiley by Thelma Golden, Robert Hobbs, Sarah E. Lewis and Brian Keith Jackson
    (Rizzoli, 2012-05-15, Hardcover)
    Known for his oversize paintings of contemporary African-Americans in heroic poses inspired by the great history and portrait painters of the past, Kehinde Wiley’s clever and ironic “reversals” have provided rich commentary on the nature of race and power in our society. His work began primarily from photographs he took of young men on the street in Harlem that he remixed with a fusion of historic painting styles, including elements of the French rococo. As rich visually as it is conceptually, Wiley’s work has drawn attention since his earliest shows in 2001. In the last decade, he has become one of the most important artists of the moment, with work as relevant and resonant to the hip-hop generation as it is to high-end collectors and major museums.This volume—the only comprehensive monograph on Wiley’s work—offers an in-depth understanding of this important artist’s work. It chronicles both the earliest paintings and photographs and his recent forays into sculpture—bust portraits in bronze in the manner of Renaissance artists.  

     

  18. Mistress, Inc. by Niobia Bryant
    (Kensington Books, 2012-05-29, Kindle Edition)
    From the author of Mistress No More comes a sexy, exciting novel about an ex-mistress who’s doing her best to give up her bad-girl ways…When Jessa Bell revealed she was having an affair with one of her best friends’ husbands, no one would have predicted she’d soon be playing the part of the reformed mistress–least of all Jessa. But her experience–and ensuing remorse–has landed her on all the national talk shows and scored her a major book deal. Now that she’s pregnant with her ex-lover’s baby, Jessa’s determined to cash in on all the attention. Trouble is, she isn’t feeling much genuine regret. Shunned by her former friends, Jessa is still being propositioned by married men–and decides to start a business to help wives catch their cheating husbands. But when more secrets about her past are exposed, it’s going to be tough for her to stay on the straight and narrow–even if it spells disaster for her future…”Bryant is an author who definitely knows how to tell a story.” –APOOO Book Club Raves for Niobia Bryant’s Message From a Mistress”Grabs your attention from the first page.” –The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers”This novel is packed with unbelievable drama that will capture readers from page one.” –Books2Mention Magazine”…a fast-paced, sexy romp that is entertaining from start to finish.” –APOOO Book Club

     

  19. Hanging Off Jefferson’s Nose: Growing Up On Mount Rushmore by Tina Nichols Coury
    (Dial, 2012-05-10, Hardcover)
    Growing up in the shadow of Mount RushmoreLincoln Borglum was a young boy when his father, the great sculptor Gutzon Borglum, suggested to a group of South Dakota businessmen that he should carve the faces of four presidents into a side of a mountain as an attraction for tourists. But Mount Rushmore would never be finished by Gutzon. It would be his son who would complete the fourteen-year task and present America with one of its most iconic symbols.

     

  20. Reckless by Cydney Rax
    (Dafina, 2012-05-01, Paperback)
    Desire raises the stakes–and the danger. . .Desperate Housewife by Cydney RaxCarmen Foster thinks she has it all–a perfect house, kids, and marriage. Until she stumbles upon racy texts from her husband, Forrest, to his baby mama, Toni–who desperately wants Forrest back. Carmen is devastated and decides she can forgive Forrest if she just has an affair of her own. But when a scheming Toni gets involved and threatens to reveal Carmen’s secret, revenge takes an unexpected and explosive turn…Sinful by Niobia BryantA psychologist specializing in addiction, Brie Bailey is surprised to find that her work is affecting her personal life in unexpected ways. For the first time, she has something to hide. And when her impulsive actions lead her into a web of danger, Brie finds herself losing control of everything. . .L.A. Confidential by Grace OctaviaStevie Silver, Black Hollywood’s sitcom sweetheart, is in for a run of very bad luck. Her conniving assistant, Kristine, has her sights on Stevie’s career–and on her T.V. producer husband. Kristine will do whatever it takes to win, from blackmail to seduction. But when a series of lies and betrayals comes to a head in the canyons behind the Hollywood sign, more than stardom is at stake. . .

     

April 2012′s Bestselling African American Books

Here are the upcoming bestsellers for African American books (from Amazon.com).

  1. A Wish and a Prayer: A Blessings Novel by Beverly Jenkins
    (William Morrow Paperbacks, 2012-04-10, Kindle Edition)
    Anyone worried that living in a small town could be boring certainly hasn’t lived in Henry Adams, Kansas. From the wealthy divorcÉe who saved this historic town founded by freed slaves to the romantic entanglements that have set tongues wagging and hearts fluttering (and everything in between), there’s plenty to keep the lovably eccentric townsfolk busy.Preston Miles is happy living with his foster parents, but an e-mail from his maternal grandmother is about to change all that. . . . Riley Curry, the former town mayor, is convinced his pet hog, Cletus, acted in self-defense when he sat on—and killed—a man. Now Riley just has to prove it in a court of law. . . . And as for Rocky, she has already had a lifetime of hurt. Will she risk opening her heart—and her life—to Jack? Warm, funny, poignant, and unforgettable, Beverly Jenkins’s latest excursion to Henry Adams is a true delight—a welcome return to a place that always feels like home.

     

  2. Sultry Nights (Kimani Romance) by Donna Hill
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    Her RulesDominique Lawson lives life on her terms, making up the rules along the way. This beautiful Lawson twin and heiress to a glittering Louisiana dynasty goes after what she wants—and usually gets it. But Trevor Jackson seems immune to her charms. That’s until Dominique plots her all-out sensual assault on the blatantly sexy contractor, who’s as cool as they come. Now passion is heating up the Southern sky.…His PassionDominique may be his boss, but Trevor plans to show the pampered princess what desire is really about. Never mind that they clash on just about everything—it’s only a matter of time before the blue-blooded beauty is his. Can he convince Dominique that they belong together, now and for all the sensual nights to come?

     

  3. RedBone by T. Styles
    (Urban Books, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    Where, oh where, have Farah’s roommates all gone?When Farah Cotton places a classified ad stating, “Cute redbone female looking to share a luxury apartment with another redbone female,” many women apply. One look at the lush apartment in Washington, D.C., and every fly girl around wants a chance to call Platinum Lofts her new home. The moment Farah lays eyes on Lesa Carmine, a pretty young woman with an active lifestyle and a sunny disposition, she knows she’s found the perfect girl for her ultimate plan. The two become fast friends—until Farah becomes intrusive and then her siblings move in, violating Lesa’s privacy. Farah seems dangerous when she’s around them, and Lesa attempts to sever ties without paying rent. Feeling overcome with blinding rage, Farah finds all kinds of ways to seek revenge. From poisoning to spreading vicious lies, she makes it known that she doesn’t take Lesa’s brush-off lightly. When Lesa snoops around in Farah’s past and discovers who she really is, she makes a grave mistake, one that could jeopardize her life. Brace yourselves, because just when you think you have it figured out, you’ll realize you don’t.

     

  4. Payback Ain’t Enough by Wahida Clark
    (Cash Money Content, 2012-04-24, Kindle Edition)
    Picking up where the suspenseful ending of Payback With Ya Life left off, we’re plunged back into the hip hop drama, where the men are hot and dangerous, the women know their shoes from their Choos, and will stop at nothing to get what they want. In a game of power and intrigue where the stakes are high and the rewards are dazzling, the losers are gonna discover – there’s always a price to pay.

     

  5. Pleasure Rush (Kimani Romance) by Farrah Rochon
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    In Hawaii for her birthday, Manhattan restaurateur Deirdre Smallwood has one mission to accomplish. She’s going to shed her humdrum image and do something totally out of character: seduce Thelonius Stokes, the gorgeous ex-linebacker for the New York Sabers.Theo is shocked by the sensual, uninhibited lover warming his bed. The pro-footballer-turned-TV-sports-analyst had Deirdre pegged for a girl-next-door type of woman. But she’s making his blood run hot and giving him a rush of pleasure he’s never felt before. This time around, Theo vows to score a touchdown on the only playing field that counts: the arena of love.

     

  6. Diamond Dreams (Kimani Romance) by Zuri Day
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    As the only daughter of Southern California’s most famous wine dynasty, Diamond Drake devotes all her waking hours to the family business. Burned by love, she’s not sure she ever wants to fall in love again. But construction millionaire Jackson Wright is sweeping her up in a whirlwind romance. Is he the real thing? Or will the sinfully sexy bachelor prove to be all flash and no substance?From the moment he sees her, Jackson is dazzled by the stunning, sultry Diamond. He knows it’s dangerous to mix business with pleasure. If only Diamond will say yes to a future glittering with their passion and love.…

     

  7. Taking Care of Business by Lutishia Lovely
    (Dafina, 2012-04-01, Paperback)
    Lutishia Lovely cooks up a riveting portrait of a trailblazing family expanding their booming soul food dynasty. . .After a long bout of misfortune, betrayal, and broken hearts, the Livingstons and their soul food empire are thriving. Toussaint Livingston is the Food Network darling, Malcolm Livingston’s BBQ Soul Smoker is still the toast of QVC, and Bianca Livingston’s brainchild TOSTS–Taste Of Soul Tapas Style–is a sizzling sensation on L.A.’s Sunset Strip. It seems that nothing can stop the progress of this third generation–until a dish called trouble gets added to the menu. Jefferson Livingston is the only sibling who feels he hasn’t made his mark, a fact for which he partly blames Toussaint. But with a recent promotion and a sexy new assistant, Jefferson is ready to show his cousin just how big a mistake he made. Then a fire breaks out, an old enemy rears his ugly head, and a stranger threatens the family’s legacy. Jefferson and Toussaint must now work together to keep the dynasty from falling apart. Can they put their differences aside long enough to take care of business? There’s only one way to find out. . . .”A great new taste in the literary world.” –Carl Weber

     

  8. To Love You More (Kimani Romance) by Wayne Jordan
    (Kimani Romance, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    George Simpson has never had a problem wooing women. The sexy-as-sin attorney is as commanding in the courtroom as he is in his candlelit bedroom. He’s always told the truth and nothing but the truth about his personal life: flings with no strings attached. That way, no one gets hurt. Least of all him. Because George has been there, done that—and has vowed to never fall in love again.Rachel Davis can’t believe the playboy her first love, George, has become. When he broke her heart years ago, the accomplished lawyer wanted nothing more than to run away from Barbados—and from George. She knows there’s no place like home—and seeing George again sends her heart into overdrive. But Rachel has a secret that may destroy their passionate reunion. Will her confessions of the past lead to a trial by fire…or a verdict of intimate seduction?

     

  9. Detroit: A Biography by Scott Martelle
    (Chicago Review Press, 2012-04-01, Hardcover)
    Detroit was established as a French settlement three-quarters of a century before the founding of this nation. A remote outpost built to protect trapping interests, it grew as agriculture expanded on the new frontier. Its industry took a great leap forward with the completion of the Erie Canal, which opened up the Great Lakes to the East Coast. Surrounded by untapped natural resources, Detroit turned iron from the Mesabi Range into stoves and railcars, and eventually cars by the millions. This vibrant commercial hub attracted businessmen and labor organizers, European immigrants and African Americans from the rural South. At its mid-20th-century heyday, one in six American jobs were connected to the auto industry, its epicenter in Detroit. And then the bottom fell out.            Detroit: A Biography takes a long, unflinching look at the evolution of one of America’s great cities, and one of the nation’s greatest urban failures. It tells how the city grew to become the heart of American industry and how its utter collapse—from 1.8 million residents in 1950 to 714,000 only six decades later—resulted from a confluence of public policies, private industry decisions, and deep, thick seams of racism. And it raises the question: when we look at modern-day Detroit, are we looking at the ghost of America’s industrial past or its future?

     

  10. White Lines II: Sunny: A Novel by Tracy Brown
    (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2012-04-24, Paperback)
    In her most stunning, riveting, unstoppable novel yet, bestselling and critically acclaimed author, Tracy Brown delivers the not-to-be-missed sequel to WHITE LINES On the surface, it appears that Sunny has got it all–looks, money, a beautiful home, a healthy daughter, and friends who love her. But Sunny has a secret—something she hasn’t even told her best friend. The truth is Sunny is unhappy. She still misses her beloved Dorian, and worries that no other man will evercaptivate her the way he did. She dated some very powerful and successful men since Dorian’s death. But will she ever find love again?It’s not long before Sunny is chasing those white lines again. And, when the truth finally explodes, willSunny abe able to put her life back together again?

     

  11. No Citizen Left Behind by Meira Levinson
    (Harvard University Press, 2012-04-23, Hardcover)
    While teaching at an all-Black middle school in Atlanta, Levinson realized that her students’ individual self-improvement would not necessarily enable them to overcome their historical marginalization. In order to overcome their civic empowerment gap, students must learn how to reshape power relationships through public political and civic action.

     

  12. Sweet Giselle by Karen Williams
    (Urban Books, 2012-04-01, Paperback)
    Giselle thinks she has the perfect life. Her fine and sexy husband, Giovanni, is obsessed with his perfect wife and gives her whatever her heart desires. Giselle thinks her husband can do no wrong. What she doesn’t know is that his lucrative adult film company is not as legit as it seems, and Giovanni’s seedy dealings put his precious wife in danger. Giselle is kidnapped by a vicious drug dealer named Bryce, who is hell bent on revenge after his sister comes up missing and he believes Giovanni is responsible. Bryce takes the thing he knows Giovanni treasures most. He plans to torture Giselle, but instead he finds himself falling in love with her. He reveals the truth about Giovanni and the news pushes her right into Bryce’s arms.  Giovanni wages a war against Bryce and anyone close to him, leaving several dead bodies in his wake. Now that he has his wife back, Giovanni thinks things can return to the way they were. Giselle, however, can’t get Bryce out of her system, and continues to see him behind Giovanni’s back. As the war between these two men heats up again, Giselle has to decide if being with the man she loves is worth risking her life.

     

  13. World Right Side Up: Investing Across Six Continents (Agora Series) by Christopher W. Mayer
    (Wiley, 2012-04-10, Hardcover)
    Invaluable insights into finding diverse investment opportunities in the emergent global economyFrom Brazilian farmlands to Colombian gold fields, from Chinese shopping malls to Indian hotels, from South African wine country to the boom/bust souks of Dubai, this around-the-world investing field trip explores the nooks and crannies for hidden investment opportunities. World Right Side Up: Investing Across Six Continents is packed with ideas to power your portfolio in the years ahead while teaching you a little fascinating history along the way. Fact is, the world’s markets have changed in a big way. For the first time since before the Industrial Revolution, the emerging markets now contribute as much to the global economy as their more well-developed peers. Far from being an anomaly, this state of affairs is more in line with the bulk of human experience. For centuries, China and India were the world’s largest economies. And so the world is turning…right side up.This change creates a wealth of opportunities for investors, in both the emerging markets and developed markets. World Right Side Up is your guide on how to take full advantage of this shift.Provides an entertaining view of various regions visited by the author, including South America, Asia, Africa, North America, and the Middle EastExplores specific investment ideas and themes, including opportunities in agriculture, water, energy, infrastructure and much moreIncludes five key takeaways from each region, an invaluable feature, offering resources to consult for more information and guidanceWhile some people fear the changes happening now, the reality is that for the forward-thinking investor, these sizable new markets will create extraordinary new opportunities.

     

  14. Bill Veeck: Baseball’s Greatest Maverick by Paul Dickson
    (Walker & Company, 2012-04-24, Hardcover)
     Relying on primary sources, including more than a hundred interviews, Paul Dickson has crafted a richly detailed portrait of an American original: baseball impresario and innovator, independent spirit and unflinching advocate of racial equality, Bill Veeck. Veeck (1914–1986) was born into baseball. His sportswriter father became president of the Chicago Cubs, and Bill later worked for owner Phil Wrigley, rebuilding Wrigley Field to achieve the famed ambience that exists today. In his late twenties, he bought into his first team, the American Association Milwaukee Brewers. As World War II intensified, Veeck volunteered for combat duty, enduring a leg injury that led to a lifetime of amputations and silent suffering. On returning, he bought the Cleveland Indians in 1946—the first of four midwestern teams he would own, preceding the hapless St. Louis Browns (1951–53) and the Chicago White Sox (twice, 1959–61 and 1975–81). Though foiled in an earlier plan to bring Negro League players to the majors, in the summer of 1947, Veeck integrated his team on field and off, signing Larry Doby, the American League’s first black player, and hiring the first black public relations officer, trainer, and scout. A year later, he signed the legendary black pitcher Satchel Paige, who helped win the 1948 World Series—Cleveland’s last championship to this day. His promotional genius was second to none, endearing him to fans in every city, while his feel for the game led him to propose innovations way ahead of their time. Veeck’s deep sense of fairness helped usher in free agency, breaking the stranglehold owners had on players; indeed, he was the only owner to testify in support of Curt Flood during his landmark reserve clause challenge. Bill Veeck brings fully to life a transformational, visionary figure who spent a lifetime challenging baseball’s and society’s well-entrenched status quo. It is essential reading for any fan and anyone with a fascination for twentieth-century America.

     

  15. Alibi II: Nard’s Revenge by Teri Woods
    (Grand Central Publishing, 2012-04-24, Paperback)
    ALIBI II picks up where ALIBI left off. The year is 2006 and Diane Praeliou is happily married and living on a horse ranch in Arizona when she receives a letter that threatens her entire world. Someone knows her true identity.In 1986, Daisy was given a second chance at life when she received a new identity and a fresh start as a college student in Arizona courtesy of the witness protection program. Nard wasn’t so lucky. He was sentenced to twenty years to life in a western Pennsylvania facility and has endured things that no man should ever have to endure. All Nard can think about is Daisy’s testimony and how much he wants revenge. Diane goes on living life, finding love, and getting married until things slowly begin to spiral out of control. What makes matters worse is now Nard is out on parole and Diane is afraid for herself and her family. Feigning innocence, Diane can only turn to one person for help. But if she doesn’t come clean about her past secrets, her entire world can come crashing down and there will be no one to protect her.

     

  16. Ran Away (Benjamin January Mysteries) by Barbara Hambly
    (Severn House Digital, 2012-04-01, Kindle Edition)
    A Benjamin January mystery – RAN AWAY. So began a score of advertisements every week in the New Orleans newspapers, advertising for slaves who’d fled their masters. But the Turk, Huseyin Pasha, posted no such advertisement when his two lovely concubines disappeared. And when a witness proclaimed he’d seen the ‘devilish infidel’ hurl their dead bodies out of a window, everyone was willing to believe him the murderer. Only Benjamin January, who knows the Turk of old, is willing to seek for the true culprit, endangering his own life in the process . . .

     

  17. Scandals by Sasha Campbell
    (Dafina, 2012-04-01, Paperback)
    Learning to trust can be the hardest lesson of all. . .Newly divorced single mom Monica Houston needs to find a job. When her best friend suggests she answer an ad seeking exotic dancers, they both laugh. But with no work in sight, it’s no joke. Soon, Monica is dancing at Scandalous, and the money is flowing. But to hold on to her children, and her heart, she’ll have to keep it a secret from both her ex and her new man. Too bad someone in her life has other ideas. The baddest dancer at Scandalous, Robin Wright a.k.a. Treasure lives for herself and trusts no one. The last thing she wants is to take in her estranged sister Deandra’s little boy, Kyle. But with Deandra arrested for murder, she has no choice. There’s just one condition: Kyle’s hot “big brother” Lance has to babysit. With a man and a child in her life, Treasure’s heart opens. Soon she’s in love–and determined to prove Deandra’s innocence–though it means the greatest risk of all. “These characters leap off the page and make you want to join in.” –Lutishia Lovely on Confessions”Drama, drama and more drama!. . .It’s a good juicy read you won’t want to put down.” –Romantic Times on Confessions “This novel will heat your seat!” –Brenda Hampton, author of the Naughty series, on Suspicions”Keep your eyes on Sasha Campbell!” –Brenda Hampton, author of the Naughty series

     

  18. The Peninsula Campaign and the Necessity of Emancipation: African Americans and the Fight for Freedom (Civil War America) by Glenn David Brasher
    (The University of North Carolina Press, 2012-04-02, Hardcover)
    In the Peninsula Campaign of spring 1862, Union general George B. McClellan failed in his plan to capture the Confederate capital and bring a quick end to the conflict. But the campaign saw something new in the war–the participation of African Americans in ways that were critical to the Union offensive. Ultimately, that participation influenced Lincoln’s decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation at the end of that year. Glenn David Brasher’s unique narrative history delves into African American involvement in this pivotal military event, demonstrating that blacks contributed essential manpower and provided intelligence that shaped the campaign’s military tactics and strategy and that their activities helped to convince many Northerners that emancipation was a military necessity.Drawing on the voices of Northern soldiers, civilians, politicians, and abolitionists as well as Southern soldiers, slaveholders, and the enslaved, Brasher focuses on the slaves themselves, whose actions showed that they understood from the outset that the war was about their freedom. As Brasher convincingly shows, the Peninsula Campaign was more important in affecting the decision for emancipation than the Battle of Antietam.

     

  19. Abraham Lincoln and White America by Brian R. Dirck
    (Univ Pr of Kansas, 2012-04-19, Hardcover)
    As “Savior of the Union” and the “Great Emancipator,” Abraham Lincoln has been lauded for his courage, wisdom, and moral fiber. Yet Frederick Douglass’s assertion that Lincoln was the “white man’s president” has been used by some detractors as proof of his fundamentally racist character. Viewed objectively, Lincoln was a white man’s president by virtue of his own whiteness and that of the culture that produced him. Until now, however, historians have rarely explored just what this means for our understanding of the man and his actions. Writing at the vanguard of “whiteness studies,” Brian Dirck considers Lincoln as a typical American white man of his time who bore the multiple assumptions, prejudices, and limitations of his own racial identity. He shows us a Lincoln less willing or able to transcend those limitations than his more heroic persona might suggest but also contends that Lincoln’s understanding and approach to racial bigotry was more enlightened than those of most of his white contemporaries.Blazing a new trail in Lincoln studies, Dirck reveals that Lincoln was well aware of and sympathetic to white fears, especially that of descending into “white trash,” a notion that gnawed at a man eager to distance himself from his own coarse origins. But he also shows that after Lincoln crossed the Rubicon of black emancipation, he continued to grow beyond such cultural constraints, as seen in his seven recorded encounters with nonwhites. Dirck probes more deeply into what “white” meant in Lincoln’s time and what it meant to Lincoln himself, and from this perspective he proposes a new understanding of how Lincoln viewed whiteness as a distinct racial category that influenced his policies. As Dirck ably demonstrates, Lincoln rose far enough above the confines of his culture to accomplish deeds still worthy of our admiration, and he calls for a more critically informed admiration of Lincoln that allows us to celebrate his considerable accomplishments while simultaneously recognizing his limitations.When Douglass observed that Lincoln was the white man’s president, he may not have intended it as a serious analytical category. But, as Dirck shows, perhaps we should do so—the better to understand not just the Lincoln presidency, but the man himself.

     

Barnes&Noble.com

February’s Bestsellers in African American Romance

  1. Private Arrangements (Kimani Romance) by Brenda Jackson
    (Kimani, 2012-01-24, Mass Market Paperback)
    No man has ever tempted her like this…Nikki Cartwright can’t believe Jonas Steele—the Jonas Steele—has chosen her for a high-profile marketing venture. It could make her career. But when she remembers the kiss they once shared, a kiss so intimate it sent their desire skyrocketing from simmering to blazing, Nikki knows she must guard her heart against the seductive Phoenix playboy as if her life depends on it.Jonas has no problem making their professional relationship personal. With the beautiful and talented photographer within his reach, he can erase her from his system once and for all. From a whirlwind Las Vegas affair to jet-setting across four continents, this Steele discovers getting Nikki out of his system is easier said than done, and now he wants her to belong to him heart and soul—as the woman of his most passionate fantasies.…

     

  2. Sinners & Saints by Victoria Christopher Murray
    (Touchstone, 2012-01-10, Paperback)
    TEAM JASMINE or TEAM RACHEL? Bestselling and award-winning novelists Victoria Christopher Murray and ReShonda Tate Billingsley bring their favorite heroines together in a novel that will delight their legions of fans. Jasmine Larson Bush and Rachel Jackson Adams are not your typical first ladies. But they’ve overcome their scandalous and drama-filled pasts to stand firmly by their husbands’ sides. When a coveted position opens up—president of the American Baptist Coalition— both women think their husbands are perfect for the job. And winning the position may require both women to get down and dirty and revert to their old tricks. Just when Jasmine and Rachel think they’re going to have to fight to the finish, the current first lady of the coalition steps in . . . a woman bigger, badder, and more devious than either of them. Double the fun with a message of faith, Sinners & Saints will delight readers with two of their favorite characters from two of their favorite authors.

     

  3. A Seductive Kiss (Grayson Friends) by Francis Ray
    (St. Martin’s Paperbacks, 2012-01-31, Mass Market Paperback)
    YOU CAN ALWAYS COUNT ON FRIENDSDianna Harrington is known throughout the world as “The Face”-the stunningly beautiful spokesmodel for her family’s fashion empire. She could probably have her pick of any man she wants. But Dianna would rather kick back and relax with a good friend-namely Alex Stewart, who she’s known, and harbored a crush on, her whole life…BUT CAN YOU TRUST YOUR HEART?Ever since they were kids, Alex has been Dianna’s protector and pal, a shoulder to cry on. But as the brother of her best friend, Alex always seemed untouchable. Now a handsome, successful New York lawyer, Alex never realized how lonely Dianna’s life has been-or how innocent she is in the ways of love. Alex wants more than anything to reach out to her, to heal her heart. But is his desire worth the risk? After a lifetime of longing building up between them, somethings gotta give. Maybe all it takes is just one kiss…

     

  4. Real Wifeys: Get Money: An Urban Tale by Meesha Mink
    (Touchstone, 2012-01-10, Paperback)
    SUCCESS IS THE BEST REVENGE, AND LUSCIOUS WILL DO ANYTHING TO SETTLE THE SCORE. . .  In the new novel from the author of Real Wifeys: On the Grind, rapper Make$’s wifey, Harriet “Luscious” Jordan, finds herself out in the cold financially after Make$ is imprisoned for his role in the brutal rape of Luscious’ friend and his business partner, Kaeyla “Goldie” Dennis–a misguided young woman who once ran a strip club out of her apartment. But Luscious is a first-rate hustler and soon becomes a successful party promoter. There is really only one thing on Luscious’ mind: destroying Goldie. Luscious has never forgiven Goldie for sleeping with Make$ behind her back before the rape, and she’ll stop at nothing to exact revenge. Yet how far can Luscious go in her blazing quest for payback without destroying herself, too? Real Wifeys: Get Money is the second installment in a fierce and gritty new trilogy from one of the most daring voices in street lit.

     

  5. Sanctuary Cove (A Cavanaugh Island Novel) by Rochelle Alers
    (Forever, 2012-01-01, Mass Market Paperback)
    Sometimes love is the simplest choice of all.Still reeling from her husband’s untimely death, Deborah Robinson needs a fresh start. So she decides to pack up her family, box up her bookstore, and return to her grandmother’s ancestral home on Cavanaugh Island. The charming town of Sanctuary Cove holds happy memories for Deborah. And, after she spies a gorgeous stranger in the local bakery, it promises the possibility for a bright, new future.Dr. Asa Monroe is at a crossroads. Ever since the loss of his family, he has been on a quest for faith and meaning, traveling from one town to another. When he meets Deborah, the beautiful bookstore owner with the warm eyes and sunny smile, Asa believes he has finally found a reason to stay in one place.As friendship blossoms into romance, Deborah and Asa discover they may have a second chance at love. But small towns have big secrets. Before they can begin their new life together, the couple must confront a challenge they never expected . . .

     

  6. Murderville 2: The Epidemic (Murderville Trilogy) by Ashley Coleman
    (Cash Money Content, 2012-07-24, Paperback)
    New York Times bestselling authors Ashley and JaQuavis are back with the second installment in the epic Murderville series. Love, murder, loyalty, and money fill this hood tale as they continue this international street saga.With Samad’s target on her back, Liberty must survive the harsh streets alone. But when a chance encounter pushes her into the arms of a new friend, Po, the two take on the California kingpin, and step full force into the game. As bullets and sparks fly the unlikely pair embark on a serendipitous journey back to where it all started, Sierra Leone. With a new overseas connection, Po sees an opportunity that is too good to pass up. When his pursuit of the American dream conflicts with Liberty’s past, will they be able to survive? Or will the drug empire that they’ve built together come crashing down?

     

  7. A Dangerous Kiss (Grayson Friends) by Francis Ray
    (St. Martin’s Paperbacks, 2012-06-26, Mass Market Paperback)
    HE’S GOT SUMMER ON HIS MIND.Sexy, single sports consultant Payton “Sin” Sinclair has tackled the world’s most valuable players–and most eligible women. But ever since his two best friends found love, despite his dangerous secret, he’s tempted to take a chance himself. And that temptation is a woman named Summer… SHE’S GOT SIN IN HER HEART.A self-made restaurant owner with a painful past, Summer has always counted on Sin. Beneath his smooth charm–and hard body–lies a tender-hearted friend who always keeps her going when the going gets tough. But now, swept up in her cousin’s wedding plans, she’s trying not to let the champagne–or Sin’s  innocent passes–go to her head. Because one dangerous kiss will only lead to another… 

     

  8. Dutch and Gina: A Scandal Is Born by Mallory Monroe
    (Austin Brook Publishing, 2012-01-08, Paperback)
    President Walter “Dutch” Harber and his African-American wife Gina thought the birth of their child and the exposure of those seeking to bring their marriage to its knees would have meant blissful times ahead for the interracial couple. But they quickly discover that their enemies have other plans, and blissfulness is the last thing they are about to experience. It all begins when the couple refuses to parade their child in front of cameras or release any photos in a concerted effort to keep him out of the limelight. A scandal erupts where Dutch’s paternity is called into question and where Gina is accused of not only engaging in illicit affairs inside the White House, but of criminal wrongdoing as well. Their marriage, once rock solid, begins to feel the strain of too many battles, too many lies and innuendo, too many people seeking to tear apart a couple that refuses to play political games or live by anybody else’s compass. And when the bombardment becomes too much, when Gina is castigated for simply being herself and is hauled before Congress to give answer to scurrilous attacks on her character, Dutch takes matters into his own hands. And when all is said and done, none of them, not Dutch, not Gina, not even their baby boy, will ever be the same again. In the third installment of the President’s Girlfriend series, the strong-willed couple is confronted by enemies from within and without that not only strains their marriage to the breaking point, but causes their own child to get caught in the blowback.

     

  9. With Just One Kiss (Grayson Friends) by Francis Ray
    (St. Martin’s Paperbacks, 2012-02-28, Mass Market Paperback)
    IT’S NEVER TOO LATECicely St. John is not impressed by her friend C.J. Callahan’s so-called passion in life: running a New York City bar that he inherited from his uncle. So why can’t Cicely stop thinking about the dance they shared at their mutual friend’s wedding-or the mutual attraction she felt in C.J.’s arms?TO GIVE LOVE A CHANCEAs far as C.J. is concerned, Cicely is a snob whose “passion” in life-writing for fashion magazines-is as pretentious as she is. So why can’t he keep his eyes off her? C.J. has a business to run. And Cicely has a job opportunity in Paris. Neither of them even has time to think about romance right now. But maybe, just once, the two could test their friendship…with just one kiss.

     

  10. Moth to a Flame by Ashley Antoinette
    (Urban Books, 2012-01-01, Mass Market Paperback)
    In the little city of Flint, MI, the good die young and the people left standing are the grimiest of characters. With reign over the city’s drug trade, Benjamin Atkins made sure that his precious daughter, Raven, was secluded from the grit that the city had to offer. But when Raven’s young heart gets claimed by Mizan, a stick-up kid in search of a come-up, there’s nothing Benjamin can do about losing her to the streets. She chooses love over loyalty and runs off with Mizan, but her new role as wifey soon proves to be more than she can handle.Puppy love always feels right, but things turn stale, and she soon finds that everyone she loves has disappeared. All she has is Mizan, but when hugs and kisses turn to bloody lips and black eyes, she realizes that Mizan is not who she thought he was. Raven becomes desperate for a way out, but this time, Daddy can’t save her. Every time she finds the courage to leave, fear convinces her to stay. Like a moth to a flame, Raven is drawn to Mizan, even though she knows he’ll be the death of her. When the hood life she chose becomes unbearable and the only way out is in a coffin, what will she do?

     

  11. Sweet Southern Nights (Kimani Romance) by Rochelle Alers
    (Kimani, 2012-02-21, Mass Market Paperback)
    An Eaton too hot to deny The Kentucky clinic where Dr. Levi Eaton is volunteering is worlds away from his wealthy Pennsylvania roots. Still, the South has plenty of attractions—like his colleague’s captivating sister. Angela Chase is sexy, charming, and looking for fun, not commitment. That combination suits Levi just fine, until he begins to appreciate what lies beneath her Southern belle façade. Her fiancé’s betrayal destroyed Angela’s faith in men—and inspired a double life that would shock her prominent family. Hiding her true self from a man as charismatic as Levi isn’t so easy, and for once, she isn’t sure she wants to try. But without the courage to trust him with her secrets, their sultry Southern nights may soon be just a haunting memory…

     

  12. Sinful Seduction (Kimani Romance) by Ann Christopher
    (Kimani, 2012-01-24, Mass Market Paperback)
    Skylar Lawrence isn’t looking for romance when she arrives at the Davies’ sumptuous Hamptons estate. But when Skylar meets her ex-fiancé’s twin brother, their chemistry is as tumultuous as the storm brewing outside. Sinfully handsome Alessandro Davies exudes the kind of animal magnetism that’s impossible to resist…and hazardous to a woman’s heart.Sandro desires Skylar from the minute the stunning veterinarian turns up at his door, but his honor forbids him from pursuing a relationship. But his plan backfires when he starts falling for the forbidden seductress. Until a shocking discovery threatens to tear Skylar from his arms and force Sandro to give up the woman he needs.…

     

  13. When Morning Comes by Francis Ray
    (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2012-06-05, Paperback)
    New York Times bestselling author Francis Ray introduces a brand new series featuring long lost siblings who find family, friendship, forgiveness and love.

     

  14. Escape to Paradise (Kimani Romance) by Pamela Yaye
    (Kimani, 2012-01-24, Mass Market Paperback)
    Desperate to flee the breaking scandal swirling around her ex, event coordinator Claudia Jefferies flies to exotic Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. As if being pampered at an exclusive spa weren’t enough, now a drop-dead-gorgeous man is showering her with attention! But Claudia’s too smart to get seriously involved, especially with a heartbreaker like Santiago Medina. If only her heart would listen to her head.…From the moment Santiago spots Claudia, he knows it’s more than lust at first sight. And this man is used to getting what he wants. He’ll wine and dine the stunning, soft-spoken Southerner with tropical nights of passion she’ll never forget. But once Claudia finds out who Santiago really is, can he turn a fleeting island idyll into a passionate escape to love?

     

  15. Daddy Long Stroke by Cairo
    (Strebor Books, 2012-01-31, Mass Market Paperback)
    Dramatic, bold and racy, Daddy Long Stroke uncovers the shocking and painful reality of some men’s belief systems about women and sex. Cairo offers readers a voyeuristic look into the mind of a womanizer who manipulates and seduces women by using what he’s got—good looks, chiseled physique, charisma, and sexual prowess—to get what he wants without remorse, or regret. Sexy and thuggish, Alexander Maples, aka Daddy Long Stroke, is a womanizer. Arrogant and self-indulged, he is what every woman secretly craves in the bedroom—rough, rugged, and ravenous. And he is always happy to deliver. Alexander knows no boundaries when it comes to pleasing a woman, leaving no area untouched, not even her heart—or her wallet. But love is the last thing on his mind. Getting paid, and whetting his sexual appetite are the only things that motivate this salacious gigolo. And any woman trying to claim him finds herself on the receiving end of heartache, tears, and drama. Written in raw, graphic language, Daddy Long Stroke is a cautionary tale of one man’s insatiable thirst for sex and his quest to bed down as many women he possibly can—no matter the costs, and no matter who gets hurt in the process.

     

  16. A Wish and a Prayer: A Blessings Novel by Beverly Jenkins
    (William Morrow Paperbacks, 2012-04-10, Paperback)
    Anyone worried that living in a small town could be boring certainly hasn’t lived in Henry Adams, Kansas. From the wealthy divorcÉe who saved this historic town founded by freed slaves to the romantic entanglements that have set tongues wagging and hearts fluttering (and everything in between), there’s plenty to keep the lovably eccentric townsfolk busy. Preston Miles is happy living with his foster parents, but an e-mail from his maternal grandmother is about to change all that. . . . Riley Curry, the former town mayor, is convinced his pet hog, Cletus, acted in self-defense when he sat on—and killed— a man. Now Riley just has to prove it in a court of law. . . . And as for Rocky, she has already had a lifetime of hurt. Will she risk opening her heart—and her life—to Jack? Warm, funny, poignant, and unforgettable, Beverly Jenkins’s latest excursion to Henry Adams is a true delight—a welcome return to a place that always feels like home.

     

  17. Long Distance Lover (Arabesque) by Donna Hill
    (Kimani Press, 2012-01-24, Mass Market Paperback)
    World-class sprinter Kelly Maxwell doesn’t have time for romance. But when she suffers an injury on the track, she begins to reevaluate her life. Facing a difficult recovery at a physical rehab facility in New York, Kelly must decide whether she really loves the sport. But after meeting with her physical therapist, Dr. Alex Hutchinson, she faces yet another hurdle.Alex Hutchinson has fallen in love with the wrong woman before—another athlete just like Kelly. Now, years later, he doesn’t want to make the same mistake twice. He tries to back off, but the attraction is too strong. And when he realizes that Kelly’s coach has his own agenda, Alex tries to protect her even more. But is he ready to heal his broken heart?

     

  18. These Arms of Mine (Kimani Romance) by Judy Lynn Hubbard
    (Kimani, 2012-01-24, Mass Market Paperback)
    When Alesha Robinson ended her torrid affair with Derrick Chandler, she gave up the love of her life. Now fate’s giving them a second chance. But when Alesha asks Derrick to save her brother, she never dreams what the scorned multimillionaire will demand in exchange: becoming his wife—in name only.Even after Alesha shattered his trust, Derrick never stopped loving her. His strings-attached proposition was supposed to be strictly business: revenge for her cruel betrayal as he rebuilds his public image. Until desire reignites—hotter than ever.As the ex-lovers give in to their passion, a marriage of convenience is about to become inconvenient. And Derrick realizes just how far he’ll go to keep Alesha in his bed, in his arms, in his heart—forever.

     

  19. Diamond Life: A Novel by Aliya S King
    (Touchstone, 2012-02-07, Paperback)
    BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR . . . Set in the highest ranks of the music industry’s fame machine, Diamond Life is an intoxicating story of love, sex, ambition, money, betrayal, and the surprising realities of making it big. Alex Maxwell’s career as a journalist and celebrity ghost writer is taking off, despite the slightly embarrassing authorship of hip-hop super-groupie Cleo Wright’s memoir. And while Alex’s star is on the rise, it pales in comparison to her husband Birdie’s multiplatinum debut and world tour. Slowly but surely, everything they swore would never happen begins to come true, like leaving Brooklyn for a mansion in suburban Jersey and letting a reality TV crew into their home. Birdie is confronted time and again by the sexy groupies who pursue famous rappers like heat-seeking missiles and he’s forced to make some life-changing choices. Meanwhile, aging rapper Z, in recovery from drug addiction, is too busy trying to repair his marriage to leave much time for his son Zander, newly signed to Z’s label and struggling to maintain his appeal in the wake of a domestic violence scandal with his diva girlfriend Bunny. Record label president Jake is trying to deal with the death of his wife, multiplatinum R&B artist Kipenzi Hill, by drowning his sorrows in alcohol and women. When he meets Lily, a beautiful, quiet waitress, he can’t get her out of his head. But Lily has her own problems to handle and she wants nothing to do with the fame, drama, and baggage that Jake carries with him. This juicy follow-up to Aliya S. King’s Platinum is a scintillating roman à clef that takes readers behind the curtain once again for the real scoop on the biggest players in the hip-hop game—and the first ladies who hold them together.

     

  20. Can’t Stop Loving You by Bette Ford
    (Avon, 2012-01-31, Mass Market Paperback)
    Temptation in paradise Smart, sexy, successful Laura Murdock never mastered the fine arts of loving and trusting. Taking a well-deserved vacation from her work at a Detroit women’s crisis center, she’s prepared for three glorious weeks in the Virgin Islands. What she’s not ready for is Wilham Sebastian Kramer. A brilliant artist, Wilham is pure magic—as bold and bewitching as his remarkable paintings. When Laura agrees to pose for him, she realizes she’s stoking a fire too hot for either of them to control. So she runs from his arms, driven away from quite possibly the perfect man by a lifetime of cruel lessons. But the flame will not die—and the memory of their sweet and sultry island magic haunts her sleepless nights, tempting her back. Yet Laura is far too wise and much too stubborn to admit she desires this man with all her soul. After all, she knows pain and heartbreak always follow surrender . . . don’t they?