Tag Archives: civil rights movement

March: Book One by John Lewis

Georgia Congressman John Lewis is an American icon, one of the key figures of the civil rights movement. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper’s farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington, and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom from the first African-American president.

Now, to share his remarkable story with new generations, Lewis presents March, a graphic novel trilogy, in collaboration with co-writer Andrew Aydin and New York Times best-selling artist Nate Powell (winner of the Eisner Award and LA Times Book Prize finalist for Swallow Me Whole).

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis‘ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.

Book One spans John Lewis‘ youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement, and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall.

Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book “Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story.” Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks by Jeanne Theoharis

The definitive political biography of Rosa Parks examines her six decades of activism, challenging perceptions of her as an accidental actor in the civil rights movement

Presenting a corrective to the popular notion of Rosa Parks as the quiet seamstress who, with a single act, birthed the modern civil rights movement, Theoharis provides a revealing window into Parks’s politics and years of activism. She shows readers how this civil rights movement radical sought — for more than a half a century — to expose and eradicate the American racial-caste system in jobs, schools, public services, and criminal justice.

Across That Bridge: Life Lessons and a Vision for Change by John Lewis

How can we go about achieving lasting social and political change? How much war must we visit upon ourselves before we recognize that war does not work?

As the last living leader of the Civil Rights Movement and an American hero to many, Congressman John Lewis continues to work toward building a better world. He was a key player in the struggle to end segregation; a campaigner and friend to presidential candidate Bobby Kennedy until his assassination; a confidant to Martin Luther King Jr., whose vision and efforts Lewis carried on to subsequent generations; one of the thirteen original Freedom Riders; and an eyewitness to many momentous occasions in American history over the last fifty years of working in public service.

Despite being rejected, hated, and jailed-and even after being witness to betrayal, corruption, and conspiracy-Congressman Lewis believes that the people can work together toward lasting social change and asserts that worldwide change can be achieved through nonviolent means. In his inspirational new book, Congressman Lewis shares his life story-the lessons he learned as one who dreamed, worked, and struggled in America’s last revolution-and describes the work he believes is necessary to move this country forward. He declares that to revolutionize society, we must first revolutionize ourselves, and if we want to demand transformation of others, we must first be the change we seek. Social evolution starts from within, Lewis says.

Each chapter of ACROSS THAT BRIDGE discusses one virtue-faith, patience, truth, love, peace, study, and reconciliation-that, when combined with all the others, comprises Lewis’s philosophy of life. By sharing personal stories that focus on political and social events throughout history, Lewis discusses the moments where he came to understand the power of those virtues and reflects on the moments that challenged his commitment to them as well.

ACROSS THAT BRIDGE reflects the values of patience with persistence, progressive faith, and principled behavior that can lead to individual and collective transformation. It is this kind of persistence, faith, and moral authority that can bring about what Lewis calls “creative disruption” and usher in a nonviolent revolution of values bringing about fundamental social change.

“Democracy is not a state; it is an act. It is a series of actions we all must take to help build a Beloved Community.”
-Congressman John Lewis

Back of the Bus by Aaron Reynolds & Floyd Cooper

Back of the Bus
by Aaron Reynolds
Illustrated by Floyd Cooper

Philomel
Available 01/07/10 in Hardcover

It seems like any other winter day in Montgomery, Alabama. Mama and child are riding where they’re supposed to — way in the back of the bus. The boy passes the time by watching his marble roll up and down the aisle with the motion of the bus, until from way up front a big commotion breaks out. He can’t see what’s going on, but he can see the policeman arrive outside and he can see Mama’s chin grow strong. “There you go, Rosa Parks,” she says, “stirrin’ up a nest of hornets. Tomorrow all this’ll be forgot.” But they both know differently. With childlike words and powerful illustrations, Aaron Reynolds and Coretta Scott King medalist Floyd Cooper recount Rosa Parks’ act of defiance through the eyes of a child — who will never forget.

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down
by Andrea Pinkney
Illustrated by Brian Pinkney

Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Available 02/03/10 in Hardcover

It was February 1, 1960. They didn’t need menus. Their order was simple.A doughnut and coffee, with cream on the side.This picture book is a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the momentous Woolworth’s lunch counter sit-in, when four college students staged a peaceful protest that became a defining moment in the struggle for racial equality and the growing civil rights movement. Andrea Davis Pinkney uses poetic, powerful prose to tell the story of these four young men, who followed Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.‘s words of peaceful protest and dared to sit at the “whites only” Woolworth’s lunch counter. Brian Pinkney embraces a new artistic style, creating expressive paintings filled with emotion that mirror the hope, strength, and determination that fueled the dreams of not only these four young men, but also countless others.

Black Panthers 1968 by Howard Bingham, Gilbert Moore

Black Panthers 1968
by Gilbert Moore, Howard Bingham (Photographer)

Forty years after Life magazine sent writer Gilbert Moore and photographer Howard Bingham to document and tell the story of the Black Panthers. The very secretive Panthers and their Minister of Information, Eldridge Cleaver would only allow Life to do the story if Bingham was the photographer. Bingham and Moore followed the Panthers for months from Oakland to New York to Los Angeles only to have the story pulled due to a disagreement between Moore and the magazine. Now, Forty years later, these photographs and their story will finally be published. The book will include interviews with Bingham and Moore about the assignment, the Black Panthers and their place in history.